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VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 16, 2017 at 13:44
Feb 16, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
Depends on the degree of rotation the mounts see as to how much effect they can have. Little rotation - use bushings, they're cheaper and lighter. Lots of rotation - bearings start to provide more of an advantage. That said, polymer bushings are sufficiently low friction that you do start splitting hairs here.
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 16, 2017 at 13:41
Feb 16, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
RS adjusters can be relabeled as beginning stroke = low speed, ending stroke = high speed. In reality though the RS adjusters are more like beginning stroke = all speeds, ending stroke = particularly high speeds.
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 16, 2017 at 13:39
Feb 16, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
@jcklondon: It is a part of it yes. In the case of fork dampers, open bath dampers run a ton of oil, which means you have a lot more oil to dilute any contaminants that get in there as opposed to the smaller amounts of lubricant used in the lowers in sealed cartridge forks, which vary from 5ml to 50ml. Air shocks do commonly have issues with aerated oil causing poor behaviour until it's mixed in with the oil a bit - this is usually noticeable as an airy squelching sound the first one or two bounces on it, that seem to disappear or reduce after a few bounces.
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 15, 2017 at 15:40
Feb 15, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
That is a pretty large topic, though something we have considered. Foam is a constant concern in open bath and emulsion dampers, but basically a service interval issue with sealed dampers. With regard to sealed dampers becoming aerated - fluid typically (this is not a comprehensive list) becomes aerated basically by air (or whatever other gas, eg nitrogen) making its way past seals into the damper fluid, or by a loss of damping fluid causing a lower static pressure at rest which draws dissolved air out of the oil. In most air shocks, air is constantly being ingested into the damper, but because it's pressurised (google Henry's law) it takes quite a while for the dissolved air to reach saturation point, at which point the oil can no longer dissolve the air. At that point it remains as bubbles in the oil. That makes damping response slower, less predictable, lower damped, highly dependent on fluid mixing and so forth.
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 15, 2017 at 15:21
Feb 15, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
@fartymarty: generally agree with you there - MTB does have slightly different requirements (pedal platforms etc) but on the whole the high end tech is very similar.
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 15, 2017 at 15:20
Feb 15, 2017
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 15, 2017 at 14:53
Feb 15, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
@alexhyland: several reasons: 1. Oleo struts are excellent for big single impacts and preventing really heavy things from damaging components by providing extremely strong, progressive bottoming resistance. They are used as elevator cushions, landing gear struts, and so forth. They are not a refined damper in the variable aperture, speed sensitive context that all other high performance dampers are. 2. They've had 10 years to make a dent since Millyard first debuted their bike and have made none beyond Steve Jones talking it up - nobody has even tried to copy them or adapt the idea in other ways. The closest thing really is the KTM PDS shock, which was universally lauded as inferior to everyone else's dampers at the time and even then that still had shimmed valving in parallel with the massive bottoming needle. 3. Second hand info has been... somewhat contradictory to the positive reviews published elsewhere.
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 15, 2017 at 12:21
Feb 15, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
@foxinsocks: Ah I see what you're getting at. There is no defined transition between negative-dominated and positive-dominated aspects of the spring curve - negative force is declining at the same time positive force is increasing. A softer beginning stroke will sometimes mean you want more LSC to push against... unless you're running more pressure as well, which firms up the middle/end of the stroke, in which case you may want less. It's not a simple relationship unfortunately.
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 15, 2017 at 10:54
Feb 15, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
If she's happy with it, chasing theoretical ghosts is a good way to spend a lot of time making your life less enjoyable :)
VorsprungSuspension VorsprungSuspension's article
Feb 15, 2017 at 10:27
Feb 15, 2017
The Tuesday Tune Ep 14: Myth Busting
@Happymtbfr: Everything helps, it's just a matter of proportion. The pressure increase inside say a 34's damper side between topout and bottom out is pretty tiny, only a few psi. By contrast, damping pressures can run into the hundreds of PSI.
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