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bigmike9699 bigmike9699's photo
Mar 31, 2014 at 14:02
Mar 31, 2014
Well those parts came off a 2013 Sight 650b frame, which had the routing going up the seat-stay/rocker link and under the top tube. So, on the 2014 frame, the routing goes under the chain-stay and up the downtube. My brake hose was too short for that, but I really didn't like it running up the seat-stay, so I did it the way you see here. It actually worked pretty good like that, but I would have liked to have tried it the stock way (under the chainstay). The 2013 frame had terrible cable rub problems, and the 2014 seemed better, but still far from perfect. With the technology the way it is these days with frame building, I was really disappointed/perplexed about why Norco didn't internally route the frame...

bigmike9699 bigmike9699's photo
Mar 31, 2014 at 13:56
Mar 31, 2014
It rode great. Climbed really well, and descending really well. That said, with the stock 140mm fork, I definitely out-rode the bike (and in the end, should have gotten a range). With the 150mm fork, it was a much more capable descender, and still kept the BB height low. This is my gripe with the 140mm 650b bikes that are coming out. Angles and on paper, they look like the perfect bike, but for some reason, descending prowess has been lacking, at least for the majority of riding I do in BC. The 150mm fork fixed some of that, but I still felt like I out-rode the bike...

bigmike9699 dylawn's article
Mar 1, 2014 at 17:04
Mar 1, 2014
Life In The Loops - Being A Bum
Max, I totally agree with you that it's what people find meaning in. And no, I wasn't saying that just because of A, B must be true, not at all. I have many friends who choose not to have children in favour of their careers, and that works for them, and that's totally fine. Some parts of society put this expectation that you MUST have kids, while other parts of society imply that kids hold you back from career development and progression, both points of view I think are very sad. What I was getting at was that while some people make a living in the bike industry, working the retail/shop side of it, most do that work so that they can "bike bum" around for the better part of their youth. Having worked in the industry for a long time prior to (and during the process of) changing gears in my life, and living a life where a vast majority of my friends are people who have (or continue to) worked in the industry, I've seen many of them inevitably reach a point in their lives where they long for something more, kids, financial stability, etc. (while granted, some are content with the more simple lifestyle of not having any of that, and that's fine too). I just hate being accosted, and sometimes ostracised/excluded when I choose not to get drunk, and then get questioned by those same people about why I don't wait for them on rides or why I am not out of breath on this mediocre climb. I guess over-time, I've lost a bit of faith in humanity... I don't think less of people for choosing not to have kids in favour of career, not at all, just don't look down on me or exclude me from group gatherings with mutual friends because I choose to contribute to society in a different way...
bigmike9699 dylawn's article
Mar 1, 2014 at 8:23
Mar 1, 2014
Life In The Loops - Being A Bum
SithBike... spoken true like someone who was never able to find someone willing to have their kids. That's not your fault, I know lots of people who are in that situation, and they are 'loving' life. Getting drunk every weekend, a little over weight, and never first to the top of a climb, but oh man, can they 'shred' the downhill (yeah right). It's about priorities. For some people, the priority is work (even if it's a $13/hr retail job), riding (or another sport that they'll never achieve anything higher than amateur in), and no responsibility (a maxxed out credit card, or a shitty, barely running vehicle, is not 'responsibility'). For some, it's about doing something meaningful in life (because lets be honest, being a 'bike bum', spending your days working in a shop, getting drunk on weekends (or weeknights) and riding in between is not 'meaningful'), and bringing a kid into a financially secure and loving world. If you don't want that, then that's fine, it's your choice, but don't claim you've (the general you, not you specifically) amounted to something in life because bike companies give you free parts, you ride sometimes, get drunk most of the time, live pay-check to pay-check (despite spending $250 a week on alcohol) and can't even afford health benefits (nor can the shop that you work for)...
bigmike9699 dylawn's article
Feb 27, 2014 at 7:29
Feb 27, 2014
Life In The Loops - Being A Bum
In fact, I ride more now, than I EVER did working in a shop. I still have lots of buddies who work in shops, and they all struggle pay-check to pay-check every month, struggle (financially) to put together a decent bike each season, hate there job, and get annoyed with how often us health-care people ride and they don't. The only money in the bike industry is through shop owning (and even then, it's a struggle for many) or repping. Unless you got the braun AND brains to do either of those, don't waste your time trying, you'll burn more bridges than you can afford. If you enjoy retail, low wages, and riding some of the time, then sure, stay working in a shop/retail (although MacDonalds will give you better pay, benefits, and more time off to ride...). But, going back to school, getting an applicable (key word) diploma/degree, and stabilizing yourself financially opens a hell of a lot more doors, and then people also won't talk to you condescendingly every time they come into a shop.
bigmike9699 dylawn's article
Feb 27, 2014 at 7:29
Feb 27, 2014
Life In The Loops - Being A Bum
Having spent nearly 10 years (from about 15 until 25) wrenching on and selling bikes in shops (and loving it at the time), and now having moved on to a MUCH MUCH higher paying health-care job only 5 years later (I now make almost 3-4 times as much as I did when i worked in shops), from my point of view, this "shop" lifestyle is significantly over-rated. Granted, I actually love my current job and all it affords me (which is more than can be said for a lot of people), and I love it a hell of a lot more than dealing with some of the retards that would come into shops. Industry deals are only worth so much, and with my work schedule, I am still able to ride 4-6 times per week (for more than 3 hours each time if I choose), and I still have a kid, still spend time with my wife, still own mid- to top of the line bikes (and so does my wife), still have a pass for the local bike park, and still get to hang out with riding buddies. Not only that, I do all my own work on my bikes, and that I DO have working in shops to thank for.
bigmike9699 mikekazimer's article
Jan 28, 2014 at 22:37
Jan 28, 2014
Norco Sight Carbon 7.1 - Review
I've seen Sight 650b frames with DHX Airs on them, so I know that fits. DBAir though, I am not sure.
bigmike9699 mikekazimer's article
Jan 27, 2014 at 20:10
Jan 27, 2014
Norco Sight Carbon 7.1 - Review
I think you definitely want something that you can firm up the low-speed compression on the fly (as with the DBAir CS). While the bike still climbs reasonably well with a "fully open" platform, on anything even remotely smooth you are really going to want a platform as the bike, like any FSR style design, is prone to pedal bob. I rode mine with the stock 70mm stem it came with for a bit, but switched a 40mm stem and it was a lot better. The reach and ETT on the sight is slightly longer than average (although, not Yeti long).
bigmike9699 mikekazimer's article
Jan 27, 2014 at 8:38
Jan 27, 2014
Norco Sight Carbon 7.1 - Review
I rode an aluminium Sight 650b all last season, averaging 100km/week riding, and 'plush' definitely does NOT describe the suspension of the Sight, but it definitely is 'efficient'. I completely agree with everything Mike found on the bike. While the suspension would get a bit overwhelmed on fast, chundery stuff, the bike still handled amazingly well. I think what Mike was getting at, and something I found with it as well is that the Sight definitely needs better control of the suspension it does have. I would have loved to have tried a DBAir CS on this bike, because I think it would have changed it into a completely different ride. I routinely outrode the float CTD on this bike, and while I don't think many riders will ride it that hard, there are a few who will find the same, and become slightly disappointed in the bike, as I did. Overall though, it's a well designed frame, and overall, rode really really well and efficiently.
Added 4 photos to Bike-Parts
Jan 18, 2014 at 18:32
Jan 18, 2014
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