Block user

Recent

DaveWeagle bradwalton's article
Nov 22, 2011 at 14:52
Nov 22, 2011
2012 Devinci Dixon RC - Previewed
Far be it from me to naysay a professional review, I'm not going to. Everyone is entitled to their opinion. I will say this about kinematics though: It is a physical impossibility to design a linkage layout on a Split Pivot bike that would do what the article said. Someone passed me a quote at one point, I laughed heartily at the suggestion, and moved on immediately. Suffice to say that if it were possible to do this, and I had built it, I would have inadvertently discovered a whole new realm of physics, and I would by now be retired on a yacht somewhere because the applications in science would be limitless. So, yeah. Whatever. I love that Dixon, I don't care what anyone says, that bike rips and I smile every time I ride it. Sounds like some other people are in the same boat with me.
DaveWeagle JulianCoffey's article
Oct 6, 2011 at 13:55
Oct 6, 2011
Reality Redesigned: R2
Spoonyman- not sure how my name came up here, but I can tell you one thing, if "All I had were a few patents" I would be nowhere. I type to you from the midst of a 12 hour workday. I work my butt off. I have been called obsessive, overcompetitive, workaholic, etc... Having an idea, a patent, any of that means absolutely NOTHING unless you are prepared to work for it, accept failure as it comes, and learn from your mistakes. I think that this project has a lot of potential, a lot of kids have no idea how their bike parts, X Boxes, etc... are built. There are some amazing minds, ideas, machines, and manufacturing behind it all. The manufacturing world is an exciting one. I am the first to point out that if I didn't learn how to use a Bridgeport, a Lathe, a welder, I would be working in a lab like most of my classmates do. I built the first e*thirteen chainguides by hand using a milling machine and rotary table. I couldn't afford to pay someone to build them, so without those manufacturing skills it never would have materialized. Point of all that is? This is a great opportunity and someone is going to get a great experience out of it. Go for it.
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 15:15
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
If you look at the front pages of the Split Pivot patents you will see that both Becker, and Crestone Peak were disclosed as prior art, and the patents were awarded as novel over that prior art. Also, if you read the actual claims of the Split Pivot patents, I think that you will see the elements described that do not exist in other references. It's risky business for any company making suggestions that suggest people or companies should not respect IP. I would not suggest that. To answer your question directly, bike consumers pay about the 1/5 the cost of a low end rear shock, or less than the cost of a single butted aluminum top tube to use my designs. I personally believe strongly that the performance of the bike is improved significantly more by my suspension work than an fancy top tube. You may disagree, and that's OK. Have a great weekend Bradflyn, Dave
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 13:36
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
Hah I missed the god's gift to women eagle egg omelets, man do I wish. Ahhh In high school I could throw that football clear over those mountains...
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 12:24
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
Coming into this, I never had any intention of "licensing" or whatever. I was approached by a host of companies, and their offers convinced me to forego a career building my own designs under my own company name, and work with them to build their ultimate bikes better. This is why I never built a full suspension Evil when I owned the company. Iron Horse literally made me an offer that I could not refuse. Ask my close friends, I obsessed over that decision. I was afraid of "selling out". The suggestion that "the dw link is extremely similar to many other patents that have existed far before, just with minor alterations in order for him to gain the rights" is comical. Using your expert advise, why don't you give me just one or two patent numbers or older designs and tell me how the design is so similar. How is the anti-squat profile similar? How is the braking squat profile similar? How does the design translate into building widely varying leverage ratio curves useful for driving spring-damper units at varying velocities that are suited for bicycle suspension use? What about manufacturing related requirements? I think that once you really delve into the problem, your perspective just might change. There are plenty of great bikes out there. I am really happy to be a part of some of them. I am even more happy when I get to ride them. That's what it's all about. Riding and having fun. All of the rest is just noise. Have a great weekend guys and girls! Dave
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 12:24
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
OK, this is not the first time I've read this perspective, but I don't agree with it. We can have an adult conversation here, right? Yes, 4 bar linkages permeate our existence. They are everywhere. How many people reading this realized that when you analyze how a bicycle (or motorcycle) accelerates, you actually need to analyze a 6-bar system? You can bolt a wheel and chain onto all kinds of common 4-bars, making it the needed 6-bar, but will they make an effective suspension design? If you bolt a wheel onto a pair of vise-grips, will that be the best thing ever? How about the hinge that operates the lifting motion on the hood of your car? How about the 4-bar linkage on the shroud of a common chop saw? Are these the new revolutions? Really, it's the wrong way to look at it in my opinion. If you read any suspension patents, you will very quickly realize that the method that I used to develop dw-link was completely different and novel compared to anything in the past 120 years. It is what it is, and I don't want that to come off as anything other than a fact. dw-link was devised to hit a specific range of performance that was not being met by other designs. I understood the physics problem first, then designed a solution, then synthesized linkages to meet that solution. Notice that the linkage design part came last, not first. (continued below)
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 10:51
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
That is some good feedback guys, I appreciate it. I definitely talk too fast, I actually have to consciously think about it at times. I will look at that video in the spot you mentioned and give the guys some feedback. If we can make it better, then we should! Dave
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 10:46
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
2002-2003: After a full year of riding and racing a Nicolai Nucleon2 gearbox bike, I designed a "test standard" for gearbox bikes called G-BOXX1. I published it with Karl Nicolai, who built the prototype bikes (Evil 2013i and Nicolai TST) that we showed at Interbike in 2003. (easily patentable, but you guessed it, no patents) 2003-2007: The Iron Horse years. Where do you think 63-64 degree head tube angles and sub 14" BB heights came from on DH bikes? If I had a nickel for everyone who told me that it would never work I'd be a rich dude. I'm not even going to get into what makes dw-link different than (insert XXXX design name here), but to suggest that its just some vanilla, rehashed college physics book is being pretty naive on your part. I got a good chuckle out of the "whilst basic understanding" part. Clearly. Hey not all bikes can be everything to everybody. I know that, I think most riders do. You don't like the things I've worked on, that's cool, I'm not going to cry about it. I am going to keep putting in the 10 hour days, 6 days a week, just like I have for the last 12 years. I am still going to keep trying to build the best products that I can, and if they are any good, the they will stand on their own. I am still going to learn. Hopefully that work will translate into even better products that put more smiles on more rider's faces. Maybe even yours someday. All the best of luck with your design, Dave
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 10:46
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
Just a couple notations about your dislikes and the revolutions, I know you are a young guy, so this stuff is probably before your time. I think that your emotional response is kind of misguided, we should be friends! 2000-2001: I embarked on one of the most ambitious data acquisition projects I've ever seen in cycling. This is actually how I met the guys from Devinci, when they started building the Evil Imperial frames that we debut in 2001 at Interbike. I don't flaunt this stuff around the internet, actually I try to never show it. Did you know that we built a prototype Sunday with integrated DAQ components? I still have it here. Did you know that I currently work for Cosworth as an advanced research tester? No, you didn't, I can promise that one. I designed build and sold the first impact absorbing thermoplastic bashguard chainguide. We started a company called e.thirteen with the technology. Your bike uses that technology today, basically everyone's does. (didn't patent that BTW...) I designed the first "freeride specific" dual ring specific chainguide. It was the first example of what is now ubiquitous, the stepped roller where the chain rides on the larger diameter in the granny and is held on the middle ring by the edge of that step. (no patents there either, FYI) (continued below)
DaveWeagle devinci's article
Sep 30, 2011 at 10:22
Sep 30, 2011
Split Pivot on Devinci bikes explained by Dave Weagle
Hey Nick, The Split Pivot is a single pivot for acceleration, and a multi-pivot for braking and leverage ratio control.
Load more...
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv16 0.034371
Mobile Version of Website