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dfiler BigTimber's article
Oct 29, 2014 at 12:33
2 days
The Unofficial Cycling Code of Conduct
So glad I don't have to put up with people as pretentious as this article. We don't care if someone wears bike clothes before or after a ride. We don't care if someone transports their full face on their head instead of carrying it. Etc.
dfiler theastonator's article
Oct 29, 2014 at 6:44
2 days
Gloworm X1 and XS Lights - Review
I borrowed a night rider and used it on my 35mm bars. Just had to remove the rubber insert inside the clamp. The screw didn't thread in that far but it was sufficient. The screw had to be backed out entirely and then threaded in once the clamp was around the bars. Not ideal but not as hard as it sounds.
dfiler mikekazimer's article
Oct 24, 2014 at 8:42
Oct 24, 2014
Spank Oozy Trail Flat Pedal - Review
I'm riding them on a single speed. Mashing up steep hills puts extreme pressure on the drive train at that gearing. Not everyone exerts that much force on their pedals but it isn't really that unusual either. These same people go through bottom brackets frequently too. While the spike pedals are fine for some riders. Many riders will discover that the bushings and bearings cannot withstand their type of riding.
dfiler laurenjenkins's article
Oct 24, 2014 at 7:04
Oct 24, 2014
Video: Strava Wars
There's a few other types too. I don't consider myself a racer or lazy. Here's my psychology... I like going fast because it is a rush. It is fun and releases endorphins. It also releases stress by having your brain go into a different mode where the outside world disappears and its only you and the trail. Brain scans of athletes show this isn't just psychological, activity in some parts of the brain decreases while other parts become more active. All this combined makes me attack trails as fast as my lungs and legs will allow. It isn't because I want to beat anyone. It is an internal thing unrelated to anyone else's performance. I'm not competing with anyone, not even myself. It is purely the fun and adrenaline rush which pushes me to go as fast as possible. I'm sure there are many other types of riders and reasons for riding. But I suspect the above description isn't too uncommon.
dfiler laurenjenkins's article
Oct 24, 2014 at 6:56
Oct 24, 2014
Video: Strava Wars
Good trail dogs know who is faster than them and on what terrain and will pull to the side to let a rider pass. It's always amazed me how mindful they can be of their place in the pack. Or at least that's the good ones. Bad trail dogs just do whatever, no f@cks given.
dfiler mikekazimer's article
Oct 24, 2014 at 5:10
Oct 24, 2014
Spank Oozy Trail Flat Pedal - Review
I'm on my 4th set of spike pedals. I love the platform shape and mud shedding design. However they don't last long. The bushing and bearing are destroyed within just 2 or 3 months. I bought replacement parts but a blind bearing puller is necessary to do the work. My local bike shops don't even have the right tools. Put simply, the pedals would be awesome but they are fragile and don't last long.
dfiler pinkbikeaudience's article
Oct 15, 2014 at 13:25
Oct 15, 2014
Ask Pinkbike: Rim Width, Angle Headsets, and Carbon Cranks
Micro-fractures are also theoretically a problem with aluminum as compared to steel. And yet we see tons of aluminum on DH bikes. When you say "carbon tends to fail", i presume that to mean in theory. There's no evidence that modern free-ride or DH specific carbon components and frames have a higher failure rate than aluminum.
dfiler pinkbikeaudience's article
Oct 15, 2014 at 8:23
Oct 15, 2014
Ask Pinkbike: Rim Width, Angle Headsets, and Carbon Cranks
Interesting that this is being downvoted. The bulk of pinkbike readers must not be ready to look at the difference between thin and thick walled carbon. My bet is that someday they will begin to make that distinction. It really is a significant difference.
dfiler pinkbikeaudience's article
Oct 15, 2014 at 8:21
Oct 15, 2014
Ask Pinkbike: Rim Width, Angle Headsets, and Carbon Cranks
fabdemaere - the strength of carbon fiber is from the carbon fiber, not the plastic bonding it together. when there is a structural failure, it is because the carbon broke. The plastic is fairly meaningless in that context. Scratched carbon only weakens to the depth of the scratch. That is the point of the whole thick vs thin carbon discussion. Matt76 - I was referring to the ultra light weight carbon bars weighing in at 180g to 200g. The renthal you mention is indeed thicker and is also almost 50% heavier. Again, distinguishing between thick and thin materials is critical. Ultra thin walled components can be ruined by minor surface damage. The same is not true of thick walled components.
dfiler pinkbikeaudience's article
Oct 14, 2014 at 13:01
Oct 14, 2014
Ask Pinkbike: Rim Width, Angle Headsets, and Carbon Cranks
josh090 - they are much lighter and stiffer for the weight. But yeah, that difference isn't worth the cost to a lot of people. I've bent an aluminum crank (spider) beyond being able to use it. I've yet to do that to carbon. Not that this proves anything.
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