gavind

Used to manage a WC team - but after having my bank account drained to zero (and then supplementing this with money I had to spend the next three years paying off) I saw the light and now just pleb around the industry.

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gavind davidarthur's article
Feb 2, 2016 at 22:39
Feb 2, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
Likewise,here. And perhaps I worded my last post poorly, Thom, because I agree with your sentiment, I have never been able to take some sections of a trail on a HT as fast and hard (or long) as I could on a FS. Problem is day in, day out I see blokes on the trail who couldn't ride their way out of a car park plowing through shtml with all the control of a moose on ice skates. They hoot and yahoo and tell you what an awesome trail it was, but riding behind I see the only thing between them and a fall is the grace of a 160mm safety net. No, this is not everyone, but it is too many folk. If these folk learned to ride first on a bike that teaches you not to cock up, maybe they could ride their new FS to the bikes actual ability, rather than their on limited one.
gavind davidarthur's article
Feb 1, 2016 at 17:10
Feb 1, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
'So as for steps from gokart to F1 I only take masturbation and sex Smile All the best.' After all this, now you go and make me laugh when I just fucked my shoulder (again!)... You ar evil Waki, EVIL!!!
gavind davidarthur's article
Feb 1, 2016 at 11:38
Feb 1, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
No - you didn't read...or maybe the whole English as a second language thing got in the way. I never said FS makes you a worse rider. I said that jumping on a 160mm travel rig without learning basic techniques and thus plowing through lines, blowing through the travel on small jumps etc etc is not going to set you up to be a good rider as well as learning these basics on a bike that will not forgive such errors. Waki, I have no doubt you are a good rider, and training properly with coaches on a FS will achieve this - but 98% on those who but buy a mtb will never see a coach or 'train' in the way that training is meant to be done. This means, like most sports (and yes they are compatible - the fact you can't see that shows the level of ignorance you have in terms of coaching and physical skill development) progression paths are present and available. Historically, those riders who have achieved at the highest levels in our sport have followed a progression from HT (and box and DJ) to FS. On a HT there is no 160mm (or more) get out of jail free card. If you can not read a line, position your body correctly, take a drop, use your legs as shocks and clean ou landings...well you get flogged. I have nothing against FS, I only don't own one at the moment as I sold my meta am to do a new build and did not have the money to do two. You keep getting angrier and angrier, Waki, so go have a ride, champ. Like many, I enjoy your rants on here.
gavind davidarthur's article
Jan 31, 2016 at 21:53
Jan 31, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
You don't actually read what people write, do you Waki....?
gavind davidarthur's article
Jan 31, 2016 at 4:37
Jan 31, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
I think you are being a little disingenuous when you say the F1 comment was a joke, Waki, but I will take you at your word. As for the rest of what you said... the term gormless dill comes to mind. The MX comparison is perfect as again there are clear levels of progression in motorcycling that involve a change in equipment. Very very few riders start out riding 400cc machines - most progress from smaller bikes.. The reason we start all riders off on smaller motorcycles is so they learn. They learn body position, braking, jump technique and track position all without a fucking great engine. Before you say "but they are kids, so the bikes are smaller', look at road bikes and see how we do this now in most countries too. Learners start on 400cc- 600cc bikes and can progress only after a given time. Take martial arts - and this is near and dear to my heart as I swapped from Judo several years ago after competing at a fairly reasonable level to Crav Maga. Now I started these new sessions with a fellow bunch of newbies, and yet four years in I have reached a high level and they have all fallen behind. Am I some ultra fighter? No - horseshit I am. It is because I have the basic understandings of body position, weight transfer, stance, vulnerabilities of an opponent... the things that form the basis of any combat. You put words into my mouth, Waki - I did not say that riding a HT makes you a better FS rider. Riding a FS makes you a better FS rider... I agree - but riding a HT makes you a better rider. You will not be a complete rider without mastering both (and BMX and dirt jumps and unicyle.... very fucking Zen I know) Thanks for the suggestion of the dirt jump bike, BTW, but you are assuming I don't already ride BMX and the odd bit of jumps. Yes - I am old, but I am flexible and bounce very well :) I think part of my disagreement with you is the fact that you talk about coaching and teaching and learning, but I don't think you actually understand these things. As I have coached I feel I speak from experience, but your comments suggest that you do not.
gavind davidarthur's article
Jan 30, 2016 at 15:07
Jan 30, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
I should also add that as well as the privee Oka I am building (thanks to Pinkbike I got a fee drive train from the Rampage Fantasy contest) I am also waiting on a reported new YT 140mm dually that is coming later this year. Does that make me a cheap ignorant bastard?
gavind davidarthur's article
Jan 30, 2016 at 15:02
Jan 30, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
And yet strangely, Waki, over 60% of the current F1 drivers have backgrounds in karting... They did not just jump into a race car.... I equate what some of you are saying to the kind of blokes who turn up at a range with their fist rifle and it is a AI AX... $10,000 rifle designed for snipers. Sure it will work really well, but it won't make up for a lack of a base in shooting technique (or the ability to understand why it shoots differently than a $1000 rifle) Loving how passionate this all got while I was off in hospital though ???? I actually do see the points made by Waki, and Thom and I don't see them as ridiculous. You don't 'have' to learn the skill sets some of us have talked about on a HT, I just think that this path has proven to be better for many and it remains something consistent across the world's top riders. If you learned bad techniques on a HT, Waki, maybe stop blaming the tool... And yes, Waki, learning to drive in a fiesta rather than a F1 WILL make you faster - find me a single driver iPad the top level that did not start from lower lev racing and I will happily eat my words
gavind davidarthur's article
Jan 16, 2016 at 3:19
Jan 16, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
Actually, Thom, I think I understand your argument perfectly - I just think you are wrong and thankfully for the mtb industry most people swallow cods wallop like yours and end up buying overpriced, over specked FS rigs that are well above what they need and leave them with a ride that is about as fun as driving a big rig on a velodrome... (Am I now doing the same thing I a used you of... Yes). I do believe that using a HT does improve skill sets and these include picking lines, body position adjustments, timing. There are sections of trail that on my 170mm 'the one' I could just blow through and did. It was fun, yeah, but I didn't exactly grow much ( but it was fun...). On a HT there is less room for error and your mistakes show up straight away usually as you're picking your ass off the turf. Can you learn everything on a HT? No - not even close, but I see so many riders out there that are just lazy and have all the style of someone who learned their trade on a big arse dually that forgave their errors for them - and like you I just can't swallow that that was better. Just as a point of interest - I worked around the industry for forgive years, managed a WC DH/4x team for two and managed Mick Hannah for three. That does not make me an expert in riding, but the one consistent theme that came up with team managers and brand owners was wanting to know the background of the riders they were going to sign. It is only my opinion but I believe they wanted to make sure they had a mix in there - ie that they hadn't just strolled straight onto a DH rig. Not staying this proves my point and disproves yours, but I think those at the sharp end see the benefit of learning skills on all bikes.
gavind davidarthur's article
Jan 15, 2016 at 13:43
Jan 15, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
The irony, Thom, is that having read all your posts you have pretty much spent hours doing what you have accused the HT fraternity of doing... You obsessed FS zealot ha ha. I have really enjoyed reading all this though - it is great to see everyone passionate about something other than whether it looks like a session :)
gavind davidarthur's article
Jan 11, 2016 at 12:26
Jan 11, 2016
Ragley Blue Pig Hardtail - Review
Greg Minaar, Steve Peat, Mick Hannah, Rob Warner, Lopes, Kovaric, Nico, Barel.... All of them started out on HT. They learned their craft on it. I remember reading something on one of the French sites where Nico talked about how riding a HT taught him about weight distribution and positioning a bike in corners correctly to maximise speed. Does that mean that the skills learned on a HT transfer directly to a FS? No - but anyone who knows anything about skill development will tell you that this is normal and not a bad thing. Certainly with FS being so much cheaper at the starting point the younger crop of riders will probably not share this path, but I don't think it hurt any of the guys mentioned. I float between riding FS and HT depending on how I feel about my riding. At the moment I am building up a 140mm travel Oka because I want more fun and I enjoy the challenges a HT can provide in this department. I have no doubt I will return to a Fs at some stage, but I have found my riding has really benefited from not sticking with one or the other. Personally, I find the arguments for or against a bit silly. Both have their place and the rider decides which is 'best' as the consumer decides the value of a product (basic marketing 101 there). If HT is not for you, great - rock on. Trying to convince you otherwise would be like trying to convince a snowboarder that grovelling between lifts and facing sideways all the time is shit compared to skis ...
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