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groghunter RichardCunningham's article
Aug 21, 2014 at 18:13
5 hours
First Look: Rocky Mountain's Carbon Thunderbolt MSL
So, thinking about it, the problem with washers the size you're talking about, especially 5mm deep, is that they'd be too easy to crush, or they'd be bigger than the inner race diameter, & possible to side load the bearings/seals. Keep in mind, there's some serious drawbacks to the 2005 Demos, & even just that feature: You had to pull the upper link off to get to the shock you'll never be able to use another shock with that bike the washers were an absolute pain in the ass to get realigned if you did take it off all those links meant getting to any knobs on the shock was a nightmare the forged front basket was prone to cracking The main pivot collected mud, & ground it against the downtube It's a fairly heavy bike
groghunter RichardCunningham's article
Aug 21, 2014 at 14:54
8 hours
First Look: Rocky Mountain's Carbon Thunderbolt MSL
whoops. Since shocks have different knobs & configurations near the eyelets, you need to give things a bit of room if you're aiming to use any shock. In the case of the custom shock on the demo, it had shoulders below the eyelet to worry about, as well as the rebound knob. Even with the space they gave it, the rebound knob was a pain to access.
groghunter RichardCunningham's article
Aug 21, 2014 at 14:48
8 hours
First Look: Rocky Mountain's Carbon Thunderbolt MSL
The conical shaped spacers were the same diameter as the bearing race on the outside, & wider at the shock eyelet. that way they increase the clamping force at the eyelet, while making sure the force was only transferred through the inner race at the bearing, instead of sideloading the seal. The space between the bearings was a significant amount (prob 5mm on each side)wider than the shock eye, for two reasons: the bearings were pressed in from the outside, so the inner seat (if this is unclear, it's the stop the the outer race rests against when you've fully seated a bearing) for the bearings prevented them from being flush on the inside, & secondly, you need the bearings to be spaced away from the eyelet, because the eyelet has shoulders that flare our below the hole, & if it doesn't have that, it usually has a knob you want to turn. so unless you want to use super micro bearings, or interfere with a rebound knob, you need to space out from the eyelet a bit. Since shocks have different
groghunter RichardCunningham's article
Aug 21, 2014 at 13:55
9 hours
First Look: Rocky Mountain's Carbon Thunderbolt MSL
technically it could, but in practice it wasn't a problem: the washers were very tight tolerance & were conically shaped(it made putting the shock back in after a spring change an absolute chore,) so the sideload from the tightness was focused into the inner bearing races. add a bolt that ran through the races, &compressed the races into the washers, & by extension, the eyelet area, & you've got a clamping mechanism that would require a significant amount of force to overcome, compared with moving a bearing. As you said, an increase in axial tension. In practice, I froze up almost every bearing in that bike after a race(really muddy race, you essentially had no choice but to powerwash after each run,) & while some of the pivots started rotating on the bolts instead of the bearings, that set kept running on the bearings with no drama whatsoever. I'd actually consider designing a bike that ran that way, but I'd make the following improvements: 1. I'd use a bolt the same diameter as a standard shock bushing, in order to allow any shock to work with it. Alternately, I'd design a spacer that could be used that would be driven in in place of the standard bushing. 2: I'd figure out some self centering mechanism for the washers. the conical shape of the washers, plus the tight tolerance, made getting the bolt back through a nightmare. it was even worse due to the fact that it was the eyelet that you have to remove from the bike to change spring rate. I'm actually having some ideas on this based on spelling it out like this... need to get some of this written down.
groghunter brule's article
Aug 21, 2014 at 10:11
13 hours
Check-Out
Easton not making the haven in 31.8 x 750mm drives me crazy. At least I can try a Havoc in that size.
groghunter redbullbike's article
Aug 20, 2014 at 19:49
1 days
Claudio's Course Preview: Meribel DH World Cup 7
& possibly the best track, this looks awesome.
groghunter RichardCunningham's article
Aug 20, 2014 at 15:28
1 days
First Look: Rocky Mountain's Carbon Thunderbolt MSL
Indeed, the demo I had (an '05) had a similar flaw: in order to make the upper shock pivot bearing instead of bushing, they had Fox making them custom shocks that just had a hole the size of the bolt in place of the eyelet, with the bearings being in the frame. Bolt went through the bearings, into some washers, then though the shock mount. Good luck swapping out the shock, or using that shock on any other bike.
groghunter brenthillier's article
Aug 20, 2014 at 8:45
2 days
Trailforks Trail of the Month: Dirt Merchant
How I know I'm a shit rider: POV footage of this trail is super intimidating to me, not to my friends.
groghunter RichardCunningham's article
Aug 20, 2014 at 7:54
2 days
First Look: Rocky Mountain's Carbon Thunderbolt MSL
Indeed, it appears the bike in the photos isn't exactly what will show up in stores, at least in reference to the wheels. They're "Out of stock due to demand" on Stan's website, but reference, they retail for $1900(A point in their favor compared with ENVE) weigh 1350g in 29er, & aren't even listed yet on the Stan's website in 27.5, so I'd guess RM is still waiting on their first shipment. Just for comparison, an ENVE 50/50 wheelset in comparable weight is half a mm narrower, 11g heavier, & costs $2718. they have one that beats it at 1289g with DT 180 hubs: it costs $3300.
groghunter RichardCunningham's article
Aug 19, 2014 at 19:06
2 days
First Look: Rocky Mountain's Carbon Thunderbolt MSL
OH, BTW, on that Fox shock: I replaced the regular bushings in mine with the polymer 5 piece ones they are using now, and they are quite good, highly recomended. & once you get the old style one out, you don't have to use tools to replace them anymore either.
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