jason-at-specialized

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jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 13, 2015 at 16:46
Apr 13, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
Yes, you have to disconnect the brake line at the lever, and push it through from the back. There is also an option to run it externally if you don't want to do that, or you are in a hurry.
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 13, 2015 at 16:45
Apr 13, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
Yes, I am referring to the foam or rubber bumper that rides underneath the coil spring and on the shaft. Coil springs usually are more plush and have less seal friction and Air springs are significantly lighter. Pros and Cons to both. Looks like Fox may have found a sweet balance in the middle.
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 13, 2015 at 13:04
Apr 13, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
You can tune an air shock to be more or less progressive with air spring volume. Remember that coil springs are also progressive if you factor in the bottom out bumper. The CNC link is more progressive, yes. Honestly do not know where the final tune on that air shock landed.
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 13, 2015 at 9:34
Apr 13, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
Without any direct experience with your set-up, I can't really offer a specific answer. In general, carbon wheels are stiffer laterally which provides a different feel. Also, carbon wheels have a lower inertia than heavier alloy wheels, and this can feel more harsh to some people over a heavier wheel that holds momentum better. Your results may vary.
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 13, 2015 at 7:12
Apr 13, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
There are internal tubes that run the full length, so you will find that routing the cables through is quite easy.
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 12, 2015 at 23:20
Apr 12, 2015
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 12, 2015 at 23:08
Apr 12, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
We went with 135 to keep the rear end as narrow as possible - for heel clearance and to tuck in the dropouts and rear dérailleur. Scraping your dérailleur against rocks and roots scrubs speed unnecessarily and you risk bending or losing your rder altogether.
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 12, 2015 at 22:51
Apr 12, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
The S3 "style specific sizing" geometry was built exactly around Troy and Aaron's specifications so there would be need to create custom sizes for them as you suggest.
jason-at-specialized paulaston's article
Apr 12, 2015 at 22:43
Apr 12, 2015
First Look: Bold Linkin Trail
148 includes 3.5 mm per side for the extended end cap "hub catchers" but the effective hub flange width is based on 141. That's 3mm wider flanges per side over 135 Remember the difference between 135 and 142 is merely 3.5 per side in hub catchers and the cassette location and flange width is the same. Flange width potential ~ w/hub catching endcaps 135 ~ 142 141 ~ 148 150 ~ 157 You have to compare 148 to 157 (not 150)
jason-at-specialized mikelevy's article
Apr 12, 2015 at 21:30
Apr 12, 2015
What's Up With Aaron Gwin's Bike?
That is a very common belief that has been debated and misunderstood for decades, and I am sure it will be debated again here and now. And I mean no disrespect to the amazing Barel in any way. So long as your spokes maintain pre-load and tension, meaning they don't go slack under load, then the wheel stiffness does not change with spoke tension. Spokes are pre-loaded springs and it still takes X amount of force per mm to displace them regardless of that pre-load. The point at which your spokes loose tension, your wheel stiffness becomes non-linear, somewhat unstable and the strength drops off quickly. This is a scenario one tries to avoid by keeping the tension sufficiently high. As long as your stay in the tensioned world, the stiffness is constant. Running spokes with tension low enough to regularly live in the slack world is generally ill advised, but certainly occurs in DH. The only real ways to change wheel stiffness are with spoke count, spoke gauge, bracing angle and of course rim stiffness (material, x-section, thickness)
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