Vintage Shore Photos

Nov 28, 2011 at 23:02
by Lee Lau  

We asked Lee Lau, who wrote the foreword to the Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides, to dig through his archive of old photos and come up with some incriminating favourites. Some of you may be old enough to remember the "good old days", or some of you might just laugh and point at the crude gear and funny clothes, but hopefully you will find this quick glimpse of North Vancouver mountain bike history entertaining. All of the photos below are from his albums, taken roughly between 1997 and 1998 - not that long ago, but it looks like a far away time and place.



bigquotesThis photo of Wade Simmons, shot by Ian Hylands, was for one of the first guidebooks of North Vancouver's trails (unfortunately out of print). Derek Westerlund and Bjorn Enga were doing that old guidebook and needed a shot, so they dragged Wade out of the Cove bike shop where he was working as a wrench. Wade dropped the "Crater" on Mt Fromme on a borrowed Gary Fisher Joshua - he always delivers - and went on to become a professional freerider who was inducted into the Mountain Bike Hall of Fame. Check out the sweet pant clip that he's using to keep his sweat pants out fo the triple ring crankset.















bigquotesThis shot is of Sharon Bader, the co-author of the Locals' Guide trail book. She hadn't ridden on the Shore for a while, but I had some old armour retrieved from a local shop dumpster dive for her to wear. Those were different times! Sharon is on the Bark Bridge section of Ladies' Only, on her hand built Brodie Expresso steel hardtail, complete with styling Judy XC front suspension and rocking a full xc lycra kit. Good thing she rides like a girl! Sharon went on to become the President of the NSMBA, helps to organize mountain bike events and authors guide books.



















bigquotesLong before Harookz ever held a camera he knew how to perform for the lens. Here he is on a rigid steel hardtail launching off of a drop to flat on Pink Starfish. This is at the site of the old cabin that's now collapsed. Harookz is now a successful professional photographer. Is that a top tube pad on his bike?

























bigquotesOn a dark, wet day Noel Buckley navigates some cedar wood skinnies on Bookwus, Mt Fromme. Noel went on to found Knolly, a manufacturer of high end mountain bikes. On the front of Noel's bike you can see Marzocchi's first edition of their Z1, a four inch travel fork that changed how suspension was perceived. No, it wasn't light, but it's open bath design and smooth stroke blew minds at the time.
























bigquotesThis is a shot of myself, taken the day before racing the Canada Cup XC up at Whistler. I had the number plate on for the next day's race already (talk about keen!) and didn't have the sense to rest before the race. This was on River Runs Through It, and I'm riding a beautiful lime green Norco Torrent with a whopping 80mm travel Marzocchi up front. The municipality didn't have risk-managers go through the trails and put up rope railings to keep us safe back in those days, so I ride it clipped in with fully lycra.














Locals Guide to North Shore Rides
Want to create some of your own North Shore memories? Check out ''Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides'' to find your way around the 'Shore



Did you enjoy the quick trip down memory lane? Want to see more vintage photography? We'd love to hear your early mountain bike memories - put them down below!
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136 Comments

  • + 86
 Incredible how much the sport has changed in terms of equipment, these bikes and protections are scary simple
  • + 7
 I think alot about how much it has evolved so quickly, equipment wise, also!
  • + 39
 just goes to show, its not all about the bike...
  • + 7
 maguras hs 22s in 2nd photo still havent changed much haha
  • + 8
 What i noticed is almost all the bikes there have water bottle holders and water bottles. Now there is all the fancy bags and camelbaks so that the bikes can be lighter and fancier by not having these cababilities.
  • + 49
 these old bikes all look exactly like Walmart bikes today.
  • + 8
 WHERE IS THE POY???
  • + 6
 @wolfe38, its also hard to believe they were "top of the line" back in the day too.
  • + 1
 I still ride with a water bottle when I'm on my hardtail it's just that my orange five was made without one so I carry my bottle in my bag. Haha.
  • + 14
 i wonder if in 20 years the walmart bikes will look like the new demos hahah
  • + 3
 These old bikes are ugly. And yeah they do look just like the walmart and target bikes that go for like 120-150 bucks.

I'm sure these were built sturdier though. I cracked a walmart full suspension in a week, only at the skatepark when I was like 11. They let me return it though Smile

It's awesome how quickly these mountain bikes got way beefier, sexier and lighter in only a few years. Glad to see the sport progressing so fast. I hope I never stop biking
  • + 18
 this made me realize how much we've became big pussies and rely on 10 inches of travel and body armor to save our asses instead of raw skill.
  • + 4
 Awesome write up. I was getting into the sport when my Qudra-21 RockShox fork was the shit. My first 'downhill' bike was a 3" travel jamis dakar with a Manitou X-Vert dual-crown fork with 3.5" rise bars and Tioga tires. It blows my mind seeing 13 year old kids racing on full out $5000 downhill race rigs now. I love seeing old pics like this. That bike Simmons is riding in the first shot had me drooling back in the day...
  • + 2
 i bet moar people get hurt now then before. people go way bigger then they did back in the day
  • + 15
 what are you talking about...bender was going off the jaw drop back in the day. i cant believe that was over 10 years ago. no one to this day has gone that big. pros try to be equally badass adding style to little 15' drops with fancy flips instead of straight 50'+ hucks. this sport has changed. videos used to play hard rock and were EXTREME!!!!!!!! now its full of hip hop and flat billed hats and all about style points. screw that. even these pics look more extreme then most today. just look at the pods. slinging dirt at the camera on a berm is getting lame.
  • + 3
 I have rode all these trails countless times, and it never really hit me about the history right in my backyard. Really inspring to know that 10 minuets away from my house is the birthplace of modern freeride!
  • + 2
 I know what you mean KTown but it's not like everyone's being a pussy. There's people out there doing stuff you couldn't do on these older bikes. I've seen plenty of fat hucks in addition to style. But yeah I know what you mean about it changing. It's going mainstream and is starting to become about looking cool, but so what. Doesn't make it any less of a sport if you're still bringing some balls to the trails
  • + 3
 Going mainstream isn't necessarily bad though, as it brings money to the sport. While the pros push the boundaries of riding, the 13yo noobs bunny hopping off curbs on Demos are the ones that push the boundaries of manufacturing, as without money technology progression will never happen. So don't complain to much about the rich guys with shiny bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 13
 The bike in the first picture more resembles an Asda or Walmart bike now. Does this mean in a few years you will get a Trek session or a Santa Cruz v10 for £99 from supermarkets? :L
  • + 2
 wouldn't that be great
  • - 1
 I think bikes should be that cheap now. think about it, $3000 to $5000 for what? cheap alloys and aluminums, and steel, etc? Carbon fiber is the only thing worth that as far as strength. even that isn't that expensive in material. its not made of diamonds. bike manufacturers are all rip offs. it probably cost them $500 at the most in material to build a Demo. they slap a specialized stencil on it and a spray of paint and it goes up $100000000000.
  • - 1
 haha funny the people who thumbed me down is a frame builder and a specialized owner...figures.
  • + 1
 Well they would know Better than anyone, wouldn't they?
  • - 1
 not really. the frame builder disagrees because all he cares about is getting paid for his job which is understandable. the specialized owner is just pissed off he knows its true but paid a fortune anyway. seriously anyone who disagrees and wants bikes to be way over priced are complete idiots. that simple.
  • + 3
 I think your just jealous that you don't have a specialized
  • + 1
 they are cheaper now... you can get these exact kind of bikes in halfords for £60... if that's what you want
  • + 2
 A bike shop could buy a 2009 Trek session 88 DH (in 2009) for £2600 and sell the bike for £3800. Trek probably makes the bike for around £1400. But the profits from the sale almost all go into the wages of the workers and designers, but with out them, there wouldnt be a bike in the first place. So claiming that they could sell the bikes for that cheap is wrong.
  • + 1
 Not true! the cheap $170 bikes from department stores are mass produced by the thousands. someone had to design and build them as well and get paid. The reason they still make money off a cheap price is because they mass produce them at a low price selling thousands of more bikes each year then trek does in probably 5 years. Trust me thats basic business and thats why Walmart has boomed across the globe. selling more at a cheaper price gains more profit then selling less at higher cost. if for one day and one day only trek would sell a session 88 DH for $300 I guarantee bike stores would sell out in minutes forcing them to order more from trek. Plus cheaper prices would bring more and more people to buying bikes and getting into this sport causing mass profits from other sources such as events and races. the more popular the sport of MTB or any type biking becomes we might see it more on espn on tv instead of having to check up on websites. who knows pinkbike could become its own tv station.
  • + 1
 yeah he's right. Walmart has those things produced in mass quantities, probably by companies that will only manufacture something for you if you order at least like 10-50 thousand of something. Walmart doesn't specialize in anything, they just buy and sell things that are mass produced as cheap as possible. Such a consumer store...I hate it. It's still not even that good of a deal. I hate Walmart.
  • + 1
 yeah i know i'm not supporting Walmart or the quality of their bikes but they have a good sense of business and sales. i have yet to go to Walmart and not see someone in line with a bike. but i have been to a bike store and seen people laugh at the price tags and walk out.
  • + 1
 also im gonna correct what i originally said. so maybe bikes like trek shouldnt be as cheap as a walmart bike but they shouldnt be more than $1500. when the price of a bicycle is more than a dirtbike witch comes with a far stronger and bigger suspension, a much stronger frame and a freakin motor; somethings priced wrong!
  • + 1
 it's a smaller market. I'm sure motorcycles are more popular than mountain bikes. If I had to give a ratio...I'd guess like 1-10. Maybe more.
  • + 1
 @KTown...You have to think about the manufacturing and engineering processes that go into a mountain bike for one. Starting with the linkage. Look at a dirtbike...they all use the same design...like the old Thrustlink on the RM's...a swingarm is pretty much it. Engineering feat? Not so much. Now look at the linkages on today's DH bikes. Much more complicated...there are equations upon equations that are run through to get the correct wheelpath and amount of travel based on the type of linkage that is being designed for the bike. Second, lets talk suspension. From a manufacturing standpoint, parts for dirtbikes are easier to make. The fork is larger, the rear shock is larger, therefore the internal parts needed can be made decently sized. And there are really no external adjustments, so there itself eliminates engineering and manufacturing all of the little internal parts that make a fork/rear shock adjustable. Now our forks, get all the same shock technology, but you have to add all of the internal parts that make a fork/rear shock adjustable (say the R2C2 adjustments) on a smaller scale. High and low speed compression and rebound take some thought to make that all fit into an 8" travel fork that we put on our bike, or a rear shock. Then there is the frames that someone has to weld blah blah blah the list goes on. But prices can't be driven down too much because next year the internals will most likely change in some way, or the linkage with change in some way, and then the entire process has to start over.

I agree that $5000 is a ton to spend on a DH bike, and the companies are making money off of it. But it's a business, not a charity. And if you break down every little thing that goes into building a top of the line DH bike, then it helps justify it a little, IMO.
  • + 2
 Do you really think the same amount of designing and testing goes into a walmart bike as a high end mountain bike. Walmarts manufacturing depends on cost where as top end companies will depend more on reducing weight while keeping strength. This will require extra design, new techniques, variations of ideas, all costing money. Walmart's design goal is how can we make a bike that is cheap, top companies design goal is to create a bike better than all others out there. That's where the money difference is.
  • - 1
 lighter means a material that cant be welded back when cracked which means its useless! thats a wonderful design idea and should be paid big for. how about pick up some weights and do things called squats and build these things called muscles. people who take weight as a factor are just plain lazy. end of story. type till your fingers bleed there is no excuse for a BICYCLE being $5000. A simple steel frame is still the best choice. cracks, it can be welded back stronger! Funny how the pioneers of this sport started on "crappy" bikes like these. like i said on another comment this article just goes to show how we've all become pussies and rely on 10 inches of travel and body armor to save our asses instead of raw skill.
  • + 1
 Welded back stronger? I think you are getting your facts nixed up. When you weld a joint, assuming the weld is good, the crack is going to happen in the hear affected area around the weld. The better the welder, the smaller this heat affected area will be (less time heat is introduced to the area). If it cracks on the weld, usually the weld is cold. Anyway, If it does crack in this heat affected area, which it should, then you are re-welding on a material that has already been affected by heat. Yes, the weld, if good, is stronger than the original material. But that new weld introduced another heated area on top of the previous one, which means the material around the new weld will be even weaker than before.

If a simple steel fame from back in the day was the best choice for the progression that has happened today, why isn't everyone and their brother on one? Why aren't all the pro's on steel frames with elastomer rear shocks directly in line with the chainstays? The pioneers of the sport started on these bikes...as they progressed so did their bikes, because they couldn't meet the demand of where the sport was going. This being said, I would love to see Simmons huck the monster truck gap on a soft tail, but that may have been sketchy, even when Disorder 3 was released...
[Reply]
  • + 10
 It's crazy how some riders went through the time and the development of the sport. They were there when MTB was about rigid steel bikes, and they are still there when MTB is about double-suspension alu/carbon bikes...and all the steps in-between! I also like to watch some videos of Steve Peat from back in the days, it was a totally different game!
  • + 2
 Got any links to the old steve peat videos? google isn't showing anything Frown
  • + 2
 here. its all in segments for ya.
  • + 1
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=1X2i9S4r_yQ

Not sure which is the most impressive, Peaty ripping on a rigid Kona, or Collins Boy's hair!
  • + 2
 Sorry, wrong link for some reason, try this:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1X2i9S4r_yQ&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

or search "Steve Peat- Worlds Number 1 Downhiller in the 1993 7UP BMBF DH Final, Eastridge Forest "
  • + 1
 just copy the link instead of clicking it guys..
[Reply]
  • + 8
 I'm on such a low end budget that I still ride bikes like that. I regularly ride an REI Novara Aspen from around 98' or so. Fully rigid and I ride on some of the trails up on Galbraith Mountain out in Bellingham WA. Evolution, U-Line, and Atomic Dog. I don't ride those trails quite as fast as some of the 'big bike' riders up there, but I get my airtime in.
  • + 7
 yeah don't let your bike stop you from having fun!
  • + 1
 Thats what I've always said. I'm sure some riders see me unload my ride at the lot, and just laugh to themselves. Thing is though, I'm still on some of the same trails as they are with their bikes that are worth more than my pick-up truck.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I remember running a 21"flatbar WITH bar ends and a 150mm stem. And semi slick front tires with knobby rears for better "traction". It wasn't a matter of "if" you would go otb, but when! Cook brothers "downhill" chain tensioners and height-right seatpost springs for the hardcores! Haha. I remember going to downshift in a turn before an uphill in a race and flinging my index shifter thumb pad into the brush. Makes me realize how complicated mountain biking really is these days. Still glad to live in the "future"!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 It was pretty easy to tell who the most skilled riders were when we were all on similar bikes...
Still got my 92 stumpy and my 96 alpinestars! I remember when I "upgraded" to V brakes! Haha. Don't know about the Peaty search, but look up Rob Warner on YouTube. Those boys (and others) were slaying on these super sketch bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Those were the days. We used to drive up from SF to ride. I met Haruki thru a website he had in the 90's that talked about "extreme mtn biking" And since I though we were extreme, we drove up there and met up with Harookz and Noel, a bike shop owner in Surrey (is this the same Noel that started Knolly?). Noel and Haruki showed us around the trails and absolutely blew our minds. At that time, no one could believe that we drove all the way up there just to go mtn biking, but of course now every one goes up there.

So sick to see it just start out...ride on
[Reply]
  • + 2
 hey guys just look at how young this sport is compared to other sports and then think about how much its progressed and changed and its still in its infant years it still has alot of room to grow and is continuing to do so every year. just wait another ten years and it will be crazy
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i was going through my actual photographic album the other day, some old school photos of dangerous dan when we did FLOWrider performances out in the streets, original John Henry Days photos, original ladies only photos before any of the rework happened, and photos of Cory when he was likely around 25 from filming with Jorli. I feel blessed to have grown up on the shore.
  • + 2
 Wicked ..Show them~!!!!
  • + 1
 Wish I could say I had grown up on the shore Frown
  • + 1
 I'll have to scan them in.... there's some gems from down at the old roach store, then when they moved to Cordova and the sketchiest place ever, doing stair gaps at BC place when the indoor North Shore races were going on. 1998-2002 was a good vintage
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It blows my mind how rad people got back then on what were essentially today's cyclocross bikes (in terms of geometry, tires, bar setup, etc...). They were hitting stuff that pretty much everyone nowadays would go grab their 6"+ fully and some armour. I also think that today's trails have been tamed down for "sustainability". I think mountain biking is more fun now with the new gear, but I think the average rider was a lot better back then in terms of skill.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Pinkbike really summed up how far the bike industry has come so far
  • - 1
 It says late 90's, thats when the bike industry started!?
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  • + 2
 ha ha ha --- I had a green colored Gray Fisher like the one in the first photo.

BAck then, l thought it was actually a pretty nice ride. My, we have come a long way.

Also had a Crack-N-Fail V700 which used a similar design like the Gary Fisher -- the C-dale had that janky headshock which sucked balls. We did 24 Hours Of Canaan with it and it sucked every bit of energy outta ya going up the wall (last climb before getting to the top, then heading back down). Those brake leverage adapter things C-dale came up were dreadful. (good idea but reality, they sucked). Then the one piece Coda cranks -- classic WTF were they thinking concept. For those in the didn't know --- it was a 3 ring crank milled from one block of aluminum.


I can remember thinking those Manitou forks where the shits, with their interchangeable elastomer bumpers: red was firm, blue was medium and l think yellow or purple was soft. you could mix match them for different stiffness.

One side unscrewed on me during a race popped out of the fork --- that was the end of my race right then and there.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I still have my old 1999 cannondale killer V. Yes it has V-brakes, yes it has 80mm of travel in the front and 0mm in the back. No I will never get rid of it.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I remember those days well .....very cool to see some of the old founders and it is great to see that they all turned out well and still have a hand in the movement ! Thanks for the memories !! Before Wades quadra 21s we were breaking mag 20s......man i loved those old Z1s, they were such a godsend. I still have brand new seal sets in the package for them if anyone needs them......Most of our old, high quality hard tails were bridgestone MB's and alpinestars elevated chain stay bikes and specialized stumpjumpers... And a lot of Girvin flex stems before rock shox and marzocchis......cool pictures !!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Man, shows how much we rely on things like suspension lately. Still, I'd rather stick to my Lyriks than go rigid lol
[Reply]
  • + 1
 my first bike was a $300 GT hard tail with maybe 3 inches of travel. I don't even remember its model name. never did that frame crack or skip a gear. Its only flaw was its cheap wheels I bent and was told by bike stores, "We don't deal with cheaper bikes and cant replace parts" only so they could sell me their new multi-thousand dollar bikes. Now I own one of those $3000 bikes and yes, its wheels are bomb proof but the frame.......cracked.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I had a trek y22 back then broke it and got a carbon y22 frame in 1998 under warrenty, still have the replacement frame in plastic wrap un-opened!
  • + 1
 For sale?
[Reply]
  • - 3
 That kind of ride is sold at department stores (sans the good components) but the frame looks like something you'd find at wal-mart!
  • + 3
 what a gem
[Reply]
  • + 2
 wow - thanks for the feedback. Maybe I'll dig up some more incriminating pictures. These weren't even that old. I bet Tippie, Wade and Smoke have some back from when dinosaurs roamed the earth!!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Oh look, some real riding!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I owned one of those G.F.Joshuas for a couple of years. I enjoyed it at the time but can't imagine riding one now after riding the new suspension designs that have come out since.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Ah the good old days! This is what I grew up with! I would love to see more!
  • + 1
 PinkBike more like this please !! For all us born in the 70s gang.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nowadays, i'm not sure i could trust those kind of bikes, but back then, that must have been high end stuff! just makes you wonder if we'll be looking back at todays photos in the same way
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  • + 1
 Show that you really dont need to have a good/great bike to be a good mtb rider. You see a bike like that now and think "thats shit"..but hey, got the job done back then....Love this article...props man
[Reply]
  • + 1
 At the time these bikes were top of the line, but compared to today they are like the bikes available at Argos.......... just makes you think will Intense M9's and Yeti 303 DHR's of today be the Argos bikes of tomorrow
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I remember riding the shore in the early 90's before any type of suspension was available. Too bad we didn't take any pictures of how it used to be. Bought my first mountain bike in 85 at Sharpey's.
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  • + 2
 lol, these photos all remind me of my dad who up until last year was still riding his '87 rigid steel bike on black trails in wales xD
[Reply]
  • + 1
 In my few months of working at a bike shop, i saw two of those crazy framed gary fisher bikes, both were in one piece. I also worked on an oldschool carbon framed trek dual suspension bike
  • + 2
 yea, thats the one
[Reply]
  • + 3
 who else thinks there should be another downhill series where theres a £100 cost limit on the bike?
  • + 2
 Maybe £500 ? But yes I agree.
  • + 1
 no not £500, since £500 would introduce suspension in to the whole thing. Where as basic £100 halfords bikes is what i was going for
[Reply]
  • + 3
 awesome pics and article! I used to have a couple of those those Gary Fisher bikes. Keep the old school stuff coming!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 cameras became better, too!
  • + 1
 That's for sure
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  • + 2
 riding like that was long before my time on a bike, but it's very interesting to see where it all came from!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "they're droppin' in bottoms first"!!!!!!
  • + 3
 Is that a Johnny Smoke quote, perchance?
  • + 3
 well done!! glad some one got it! used to ride a little with most of those boys once and a while back in the day. Wheelie droppin' whatever we could find, man it sure used to be fun!!
  • + 2
 Dear Memoirs,

Woo! Long top-tube with a short stem. Cantilevers, just before them fancy v-brakes hit the scene. Two-inch travel fork on a steel hard-tail (Brodie Xpresso for this fellow). Onza Porcupine tires. Sketchy and fun, absolutely. I remember a time when I was shown the trail Pink Starfish, and partway down the trail, if recalls serves me well, we took a detour into a trail called The Crippler, where after a short walk the trail began with no discernible entrance. It was a secret, so I felt privileged. At the time, that trail handed my as5 to me, most likely because I used clips and didn't drop my post -- "Drop my seat-post? What for?" -- but also because it was beyond anything I was used to riding. I got spanked -- what an eye-opener. "Wake up, buddy! This is the business." I value having had the education.

Cheers, chettjames!
  • + 1
 Beyond awesome! Sharon had a Brodie eXpresso too and she's riding it in the shot. I still use it for my commuter.
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  • + 2
 I had one of those Z1's on my Kona Hot back in the day... Way simpler times if you ask me.
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  • + 1
 I've photos from the canadian national XC championships in 1991 and there was a total of SIX suspension fork equipped bikes out of the entire field as I recall.
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  • + 1
 Dekerf Generation '97. Raced XC, DH, and even did some DJ'n on "Big D". Now set up as a SS. You can't beat a good hand made steel bike!
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  • + 2
 Its amazing how much the sport has changed! Everything they use is so basic compared to now!
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  • + 3
 These pictures are great!
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  • + 3
 I remember those days like yesterday... Wade Simmons is a Legend...
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  • + 2
 love the wade simmons grey tracksuit! AWESOME!
  • + 1
 I was hoping someone would notice that! Wade's middle name is STYLE
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  • + 2
 Brake pads on these kind of trails would suck Razz
  • + 1
 not suck, but scream, screech and grind!
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  • + 2
 nice, i got the firs episode of the NS video....
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  • + 2
 niceWink would have been good times, riding there in those daysWink
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  • + 2
 True what they say today. All the gear no idea!
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  • + 2
 That's one heck of an advertisement right there...
  • + 2
 This was fun to write. No obsessing about gear or bling parts
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  • + 2
 Look ma, no disk brakes!!!!!
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  • + 1
 i remember the hydro rim brakes, man they were good brakes. AHah ya that gf bike prob did explode hahha
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  • + 1
 man its crazy to see how fast the sport has progressed in such a short amount of time
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It's crazy to imagine what these guys were trying to do on bikes of that type
[Reply]
  • + 1
 these bikes were as good as it got back in the day. now you could compare it to modern walmart bike.
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  • + 1
 now THAT was when the REAL RIDING happened
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  • + 1
 Holy frick I'm getting old, those pics made me cry!!!
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  • + 1
 Wow, the sport has come a long way since I was 2 years old Razz
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  • + 1
 We've come quite far since 1997.
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  • + 1
 The oldskool stuff just looks Dangerous!
  • + 1
 But Dangerous is Fun, I thought thats why we did this sport, get that little edge of danger going on right, right?
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  • + 1
 Old School Rocks!!! Awesome pics, that's the story of all of us!
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  • + 1
 Let's not forget Jason McRoy ??
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  • + 1
 Also, please post old shaums march and jay hoots videos!
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  • + 1
 Hahah thats awesome !
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  • + 1
 Yay mountain biking!
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