The Langtang Himalayas, home to the mythical abominable snowman - the Yeti, lies between Kathmandu Valley and the fabled Tibetan plateau. Langtang Lirung, the signature mountain in this region, stands at an amazing 7,292 meters. Langtang is only the18th highest mountain in Nepal, yet it is higher than any other mountains outside of South Asia.

The idea of riding the Langtang trekking route first got into my head in 2007 when pros Hans Rey, Wade Simmons and Richie Schley took a flight on a cold war era Russian MI-17 helicopter and rode down this extremely technical trail. Since then I’d proposed the idea to several riding buddies over the years, but with no success. The process of having to drive one whole day and then trek for three more days before a single roll of the wheel had turned out to be quite a difficult idea to sell.

And then along came Aussie Grant Dansie - a development worker on a two week-long work trip to Nepal. The fact that he had brought his Santa Cruz Nomad along and extended his trip here by a week to ride the Himalayan trails made him an ideal candidate. I met him randomly while riding at Nagarkot, one of my favorite trails in Kathmandu, and he jumped on the wagon the minute I popped the question. No hesitations!

I met Grant on a Sunday, and we were set to leave on Wednesday as soon as he got done with his official business.


We departed Kathmandu late Wednesday afternoon on a trusted 1989 Mitsubishi Montero.


After spending first night at the subtropical town of Bidur, in the foothills of the Langtang Himalayas, we continued our drive the next morning upstream alongside the guzzling Trishuli river. Named after Lord Shiva's Trident - the Trishul, these ice cold waters is the elixir that supposedly cured the Hindu god when he drank a sea of poison that was set to destroy the universe.


Upon reaching Syafru Besi, we split from our Montero and started our three day long hike. We would see many beautiful things in the coming days...


Tea shops and mountain lodges are aplenty on this classic trekking trail (left). Rhododendrons are Nepal’s national flowers, and March to May are the best times to see these flowers in full splendour (right).


Good ol’ mountain horses carry our carefully packed bike bags. Horses, mules, and human porters are still the only feasible way to transport supplies and materials to the Langtang Valley. Yes, one could use helicopters as well, but they are super expensive and you get less of the local scenery.


The yak on the right’s got a bit more style!


And we keep on walking...



Every evening the visitors gather in the warmth of a teahouse lodge kitchen, or hang out in the dining room.


The Himalayan Musk Deer, another rare and endangered animal native to the Himalayas.



Finally its time to take the bikes off the bags, and build them... under careful eyes.


Riding out of the main gate of a 2 hundred year old monastery, which also houses the Monastery Hotel...




4 days after setting off from Kathmandu, we finally get to ride our bikes.


A scouting ride around the Kyanjin Valley




After a brief ride, the heavens open up and it starts snowing.


The weather miraculously clears up after a mini snow storm, giving us a view of the majestic Himalayas.




The clear weather in the evening lets us sneak a short ride in.


The crystal clear night sky in this high Himalayan valley...



The next morning is absolutely stunning as we start our ride down from 3,800 m (12,500ft)



The trail from Kyanjin to Langtang is fast and flowy. It takes us only 20 minutes to complete the same journey that had taken us 3 hours by foot the day before.


Paying careful attention to our GoPro footage.


Poor goat is not too keen on getting fleeced by a Khukuri - a Nepali knife traditionally used by the Gurkhas.

its REAL All the stories you ve heard about the Himalayan Herbs growing in abundance is real

its REAL!! All the stories you’ve heard about the Himalayan Herbs growing in abundance is real!





A complete change in surroundings and terrain after passing a village called Lama Hotel.


A couple of mechanicals and a minor wipeout towards the end...



We cross over to the other side of the Trishuli River into the village of Syafru Besi to end the ride.


2,750 meters (9,000) descended over 33 kilometers of singletracks.


47 Comments

  • + 31
 if i went there i would probably just smoke all that weed and forget i even had a bike Razz
[Reply]
  • + 13
 Why bother walking if you have somewhat AM bikes?
  • + 22
 really high altitudes, lack of oxygen, serious fitness required? all of the above
  • + 7
 or rather, if you're gonna hike, why not use more gravity oriented bikes?
  • + 7
 There's gotta be something to complain about, right? I can see from the pictures that it was a very epic ride. I don't care how much travel or which through axles they had on their bikes. Thanks for sharing the data on the map, who know's it might be useful once!
[Reply]
  • + 7
 In one word EPIC. Good on ya guys!! I love all forms of biking, but as the years pass by I'm more inclined to return to my riding roots. All-day (or multi day) epic excursions with a huge pack of food, water, safety supplies, and maybe even a rear mech!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Epic and amazing scenery! How much does it cost for lodging plus a porter (and a horse) to get the bikes up there? Was thinking of booking a bike trip with Sacred Rides, but wouldn't mind a bit of an adventure if I could just wing it on my own.
  • + 3
 Hi Joe. I am Sacred Rides' local guide here in Nepal. We don't offer this trip commercially yet as we're still working on developing it, but definitely check out the Mustang trip: www.sacredrides.com/rides/nepal/himalayatreasures.
  • + 1
 Great, thanks Mandil. I read about the Mustang Valley trip- simply awesome! I know Nepal is in the Himalayas but when would be a good time to visit - with regards to biking, that is.
  • + 1
 The best time to vist would be during Fall (Oct,Nov) or Spring (Mar,Apr,May)....
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Half way down without seeing a pic of a bike i was thinking you needed a name change to PinkHike...
  • + 2
 i see what you did there
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Mission accomplished, nice work.. Great report, great photos.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 maybe a GoPro movie compilation ?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I wanted to see YETI bikes haha
  • + 1
 I wanted to see some yeti bikes too. oh well very cool adventure anyways. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Please share the track file....if not here on everytrail.. . the problem with the internet is it gives whingers a forum..... Epic mate....very cool.
  • + 1
 Check inbox mate
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I cant resist coming there with you guys! Great photos!!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 loving the field full ganja =)
[Reply]
  • + 3
 AWESOME!!! that is a trip, would castrate my left testicle to do that
[Reply]
  • + 2
 One of my dreams is to go in the Tibet's mountains with my bike to ride a long with my friends!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What is the possibility of pedalling up into the upper Langtang,as well as down? Are packs checked for video cams? US $1000 fee for video cam use? Thanks
  • + 1
 You could carry or take a horse up to upper Langtang, and I don't think there is an extra permit for that. I'm not too sure. The fee is most likely for professional camera crews, I'm not very sure though.
  • + 1
 From Syabrubesi, (or Dhunche) would it be possible for a very fit rider, to pedal up these trails, into the Langtang valley, or are they just too steep and impractical to do so? Thanx Mandil. I'll be going in October and I just want find out what's possible, without having to carry my bike too much on these trails. Upper Langtang thru Kangja La pass and down the Halambu treking trails all the way to Kathmandu. Does this sound insane? Looking at maps, watching video of these areas, it's difficult to get a genuine feel for the ruggedness. Thanx again for any info you can give me.
  • + 1
 Starting off from Syafru Besi, the first day up to Lama Hotel is very steep and almost all rock gardens, so you'll only be able to ride small sections of it. The next day, after may be about half a day of carrying, the valley opens up at Ghodatabela. You can ride most of the way from there to Langtang and on to Kyanjin the day after that. Keep in mind the altitude though as its a great leveller. I can't tell you much about coming down through Kangja La to Helambu as I haven't been there. Even trekkers rarely take that route, so I'm assuming its quite rugged and isolated.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 it's amazing,wish i was there Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 2
 bikes, big mountains, and herb. This gets my vote of approval.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Gotta love the herbs!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 kinda looks like the village from Uncharted 2
[Reply]
  • + 1
 hike 4 days for 32 km ride.....all the pic are very good
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So that Mustang Bike is basically a Giant Reign?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The pictures... my jaw just hit the floor.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that's some crazy terrain.. stellar shots
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice! What's the deal with that Mustang bike? I like it.
  • + 3
 bike needed a paint job, so I put up a custom label while I was at it and named her after my favorite riding place .. Smile
  • + 1
 Oh, OK. So what was the bike originally? I wanna go so bad!
  • + 2
 its originally a Giant Reign. you should totally come! get in touch with Mike at ride@sacredrides.com.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 STD available at the hotel? Hmm... -.-
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yeti is like sex on wheels!
  • + 7
 lots of ppl talk about sex on wheels, but even though I'm totaly fkd up creative person I just can't imagine a quality shag on a bike... tell me about it
  • + 2
 there wasnt even pics of yetis in this...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 epic! you guys rock! so fuckin' awesome!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i bet that bud sucks :/
[Reply]

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