Pinkbike Product Picks

Oct 11, 2012 at 15:01
by Mike Levy  

Garmin Edge 500

While bigger than a standard cycling computer, Garmin's $249.99 USD Edge 500 is much more compact than the higher-end Edge 800, but still offers all of the important functions that the majority of users will appreciate. Think of it this way: whereas the $449.99 USD Edge 800 features a mapping touch screen and a claimed 15 hour battery life, the smaller 500 forgoes the touch screen, has a claimed 18 hour battery life, and retails for nearly half the price. A number of metrics are tracked, including distance, speed, location, and both elevation gain and loss, and you can also use it to monitor power via its ANT+ compatibility. Heart rate and cadence are yet other options if you choose to jump up to the $349.99 USD version. Interestingly, while there is a current temp readout, the unit forgoes saving your maximum speed for viewing after the ride. Colour options include black/silver, red/black, and the blue/silver version shown here. www.garmin.com


Garmin Edge 500 for Product Picks
The Edge 500 is a great GPS enabled computer that has been with us on every ride since it arrived,



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWhen it comes to GPS units, Garmin's Edge 500 is the one that we see mounted to most rider's handlebars. Setting up the 500 is a cinch, and even those who have trouble figuring out how to use a calculator should be able to master it. The computer head attaches via an O-ring mounted twist-lock perch that can be located on either the bar or stem, and it all can be removed in seconds if needed but we never had an issue with it coming off on the trail. That said, it would rotate slightly on rough terrain. This wasn't a big deal, but some riders may want to check out the Tate Enterprises Bar Fly mount that offers a more secure fixing point (although it does put the computer out in a more vulnerable position in front of the bar). Scrolling through the pages is easy to do, although we'd like to see the buttons have a more tactile feel to them for gloved hands, and we liked the ability to set up each page with the information that means the most to us. The display itself is also relatively large and easy to read, and the on/off light is handy when needed. Our Edge 500 did well against Mother Nature as well, with it not being any worse for wear after some very wet rides. We even left it on the handlebar during a jet wash-assisted bike cleaning, and although we don't recommend doing the same, the little blue and white computer was no worse for wear. Battery life fell a bit short from Garmin's 18 hour claim, with us getting approximately 15 hours worth of use before it gave out the terminal 'beep' to let us know it was done work for the day, but keep in mind that battery life will vary depending on conditions. We should also note that we didn't use the heart rate strap option (you can purchase the Edge 500 with it for $349.99 USD or without it) as that function isn't high on our list of requirements. One of our issues with not just the Edge 500, but all GPS-type computers is a loss in signal strength caused by tree cover or something else in the way, and a rarer occurrence called GPS drift that results in inaccurate readings. The result is questionable data, an especially annoying outcome if you like to compare your segment times on Strava - it can be far enough off that certain segments are missed entirely. This won't be an issue for riders who are using the GPS unit to track their rides for their own good and not to compare times online, and it needs to be mentioned again that this is an issue that can affect all GPS computers, but keep it in mind if you are thinking about spending a few hundred dollars on a computer for Strava-only use. We'll admit that, for the most part, we've always been staunchly against using any type of cycling computer, preferring to focus on simply going for a ride instead of any hard data. We've had to eat some humble pie lately, though, as the Edge 500 has been with us on every ride since mid-Summer, and we now find ourselves keeping track of a number of the ride figures. Yes, we still go out and have fun, but being able to note that we've done a massive amount of climbing or distance on a particular loop certainly adds to that post-ride, accomplished feeling. Don't think you're into that? Fair enough, then the Edge 500 isn't going to be for you. But it is a great option if you like to know the metrics produced by all of your hard work in the saddle. - Mike Levy



Specialized Roval Traverse 29er wheelset

Specialized's Roval Traverse 29 wheelset has been assembled with abuse from hard-charging 29er riders in mind, with a 28mm width (external, 24mm internal) that means that they are well-suited to high-volume tires in the 2.4" width region. You'll find a set of nicely machined, sealed bearing hubs at the center, with the rear sporting a lightweight aluminum freehub body that employs DT Swiss' proven Star Ratchet clutch mechanism. Straight pull spokes tie everything together, with 32 used on both the front and rear wheels, as well as DT Swiss' Pro Lock hexagonal nipples to keep the tension from backing off over time. The Rovals can be fitted to nearly any bike thanks to easily convertible axle endcaps that allow the front hub to swap between quick-release, 15mm, and 20mm, while the rear can go from 135mm or 142mm axle spacing. The 1,860 gram Roval Traverse 29 wheelset retails for $699.00 USD. www.specialized.com


Specialized Roval Traverse 29er wheels for Product Picks
Lighter than most stock 29er wheelsets and able to fit nearly every axle size, the Roval Traverse 29er wheels are a worthy upgrade.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe've used the Roval Traverse 29 wheels for nearly a full season, putting them on a number of different test bikes during this time and riding them on everything from Utah's rocky singletrack to B.C.'s wet and rooty trail network. How did the 1,860 gram wheelset fair? Very well. The tubeless-friendly internal rim shape makes doing a conversion painless, especially when fitting them with Specialized's own tires (near-instant bead seating, even with a hand pump!), and they come equipped with rim strips and valve stems to do just that. The tool-free convertible hubs also made fitting them to a bunch of different test bikes very easy, allowing us to put more time on them than if they weren't so adaptable. There was some minor truing required of the rear wheel, but the rim's sidewalls remain dent and ding free despite our often complete disregard for both tire pressure and line choice. The straight pull spokes used to build the Traverse 29ers have also stood up well, with not a single broken spoke or troublesome aluminum nipple during the test. Having said that, straight pull spokes are less common than your garden variety J-bend spokes, so we'd suggest having a few in your spare parts box. Internally, the rear hub's DT Swiss Star Ratchet clutch system is the best in the biz, even if the pick-up isn't as fast as some other options out there. As has always been the case for us, it proved to be ultra-reliable. If some maintenance is required, the entire system can be pulled apart by hand, cleaned, re-lubed, and put back together in only a few minutes. It doesn't hurt that the sound that emanates from the twin ratcheting discs is like music to our ears. Bearing life was par for the course, with them feeling a touch rough after a Winter/Spring/Summer riding schedule, but we can't complain on that front. Anything to grumble about? Big, aggressive riders might notice less lateral rigidity compared to heavier options or wheels that employ a burlier rim, but we'd say that the Traverse 29ers can still handle a hell of a lot of abuse. We're not big guys, but we like to get a bit rowdy from time to time, and the wheels gave us no troubles until a massive crash put the front wheel into a shape that made it unrideable. We can't fault the Traverse wheels, though, given that it was an event that would have destroyed any other wheel, but we still feel obliged to mention the outcome. Their weight might not seem like anything to brag about, but they are lighter than many 29er wheelsets that come as stock equipment on a mid-level bike, making them a worthy upgrade in our minds for a rider who wants an easy-to-tubeless wheelset that employs DT Swiss' super-dependable Star Ratchet clutch. - Mike Levy



Smith Optics Pivlock V2 glasses

Smith Optics' Pivlock V2 features aggressive styling and a minimalist design that does without an upper frame element. Instead, each arm attaches to the top corner of the lens via a pivoting (hence the name) mount that allows lenses to be swapped out in seconds. The diminutive three-way adjustable nose piece slips on separately as well, making the V2 one of the airiest looking designs that we've seen. The medium-sized lens - there is also a 'Max' option that offers more coverage - employs a hydroleophobic coating that is said to help moisture to bead up and roll away. The V2 kit comes with three lenses: the stock lens on the frame, known as 'Super Platinum', as well as both a clear option and an orange tint called 'Ignitor'. While we tested the blue and white model, our favorite has to be the new 'Impossibly Black' version that also comes stock with a photochromic lens that self-adjusts to changing light conditions. Everything comes from Smith in a rigid case, with a retail price of $159.00 USD. www.smithoptics.com


Smith Optics Pivlock V2 for Product Picks
Great optics, very fog-resistant, and they look fast just sitting on the table. Not as casual as some other options, though.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Pivlock's frame-less design may not be what some riders are into, with its 'Look at me, I'm European' appearance, but we have to concede that they are absolutely the best choice when it comes to glasses that resist fogging. This is especially important for us given that we spend most of our time riding in B.C.'s temperate rain forest, a location that often results in near-instant fogging when we come to a stop on the trail. The Pivlock's ability to stay clear must surely be down to their very open frame-less design that not only allows air to circulate behind them, helping them to clear quickly if they do start to haze up, but they also seem to sit a bit further out from our face when compared to other choices. Swapping lenses is simple, requiring that you only rotate each arm up to unlatch it, and the adjustable, ratcheting nose piece makes for an easy custom fit that won't alter its shape unless you want it to. The single issue that we take with the Pivlock is that we routinely experienced sweat beads running down the lens, an annoying quirk when suffering up a long, hot climb, although it didn't happen at anything above walking speeds. Besides that one foible, we're extremely happy with the Pivlocks. The $159 USD asking price is a lot of money, but the three lens options and hard case that are included in the Pivlock V2 kit takes some of the sting out of it. Still, we can see many riders shunning the V2s given their styling and price, which is a shame given how well they perform. - Mike Levy


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166 Comments

  • + 103
 where's the sweet lycra to go with these product picks?
  • + 12
 I won't say the same for wheelset and glasses, but the edge 500 is definitely not a toy for only lycra wearing guys. Okay, not many all mountain or trail biker need a heart rate or cadence sensor, but for the other features, edge 500 is superb and GPS is very, very useful.
  • + 3
 Oh don't worry, the lycra will be in the next products picks article.
  • + 12
 so much hate on lycra... Frown but what people seem to forget is even downhillers wanted to use it until it got banned for being too manly
  • + 16
 With manly you mean it's liked by other man? Wink
  • - 2
 no the edge 500 is absolutely a toy for lycra wearers
  • - 24
 Lycra got banned by the UCI because Tracy Moseley wore a skin suit and beat Rachel Atherton by 4 seconds. and Atherton bitched about it. (rightfully so, if you have a sponsor like TLD, or Fox you can't just throw on a skin suit) Frankly i think all forms of off road cycling should distance themselves from that image. Trek did wind tunnel testing and found no advantage. Maybe if XC riders didn't look like ass hats, the rest of us would embrace them a bit more.
  • + 27
 @krash Have you ever ridden an xc race in baggies? Hell. There's a reason for the lycra.
  • - 20
 yeah i have, and in lycra too. i did not feel a difference at all.
  • + 24
 Then you weren't going quick enough!
  • - 18
 XC isn't quick! its all grinder climbs and switch backs. even in open sections whats the fastest you can go, 30 Km/h? i'm not suggesting we send these guys out looking like Cholos, but i think a pair of dh race shorts and a loose fitting short sleeve jersey might be a better image for the sport.
  • + 27
 Castelli bib shorts coming up in next week's PP...? We've done knee warmers before. Think outside of the box, people. The Edge 500 can be used for Strava timing on your DH runs (if you're into Strava), the glasses just make sense for riding in shit weather ect, and the wheels are intended for AM use (admittedly on a 29er).
  • + 35
 I think the function of Lycra in xc racing is more then just wind resistance. Its more comfortable when it comes to chaffing and rubbing. Over an hour and half plus race, even more in marathon xc distances it makes sense to wear lycra because it will cause less chaffing and be more comfortable on the ass then a loose fitting bagging shirt and shorts. I will always wear loose fitting stuff for the majority of my rides because they are at a more casual pace and i can stop and rest, but if i am in the saddle non stop for hours on end(like an xc race or road riding) I will wear lycra because it is more comfortable, not because of a few milliseconds or seconds I might save. There is nothing wrong with lycra, it serves a purpose. It doesn't hurt the image of mountain biking, lets grow up and stop bashing on other forms of riding. I ride everything from a dh bike to to a road bike, if it has two wheels sign me up and i will wear whatever clothing is best suited to the ride I plan on doing.
  • + 25
 krash, I think it's great that you share your insecurities with us today.
  • + 11
 how about this: wear lycra underwear under your DH shorts, like the thigh length kind (reebok , under armor) . done.
  • + 2
 malathion knows what's up. Lycra under baggies makes baggies so much better. My backyard ride is 2800' straight up the side of a mountain, I ride it on my dh bike but usually I'm wearing lycra, so much more comfortable on the way up.
  • + 4
 I switch between wearing baggies and lycra and i find lycra more comfy and makes it a lot easier to lean back behind the saddle and makes some deference if your cycling into a headwind. Dont hate it till you've tried it!
  • - 7
 Actually voodoo5 my point has nothing to do with insecurities. I have worn tight fitting gear in the past when I was into xc racing, but for the growth of the sport I think maybe the most visible discipline of our sport could use a make over. I think beginners would be a lot less intimidated if the sport took on less of a "tour de france/ lance armstrong look". I have a lot of respect for high level XC racers. I do however feel that it XC racing doesn't exactly have a "come on out and have fun" feel, and image contributes to that. Stop trying to turn everything into a flame war... for f*ck sake people...
  • + 7
 Never have had an issue wearing baggy shorts on a long ride, no interest in tight stuff for me...
  • + 5
 Cross country racing doesn't have a "come on out and have fun" feeling to it not because people wear lyrca. At local weeknight race series I bet most riders are in their baggies cause they are your average weekend warrior. I think it doesn't have that feeling because of the fitness requirements if you wanted to compete. Not hating on downhillers but you spend the majority of your time working with gravity, XC racers are often fighting against it.
  • + 19
 mountain biking is good, can we agree on that?
  • + 3
 i wear under armour shorts riding, or sweat pants. never had a problem, ride 20k + in those clothes. only thing is the crotch on the shorts might get caught on the seat if the seat is too high. but i've since learned how to get around that problem. clothes dont make the rider like all you guys seem to think it does.
  • + 0
 In our local race series i'd say 90% of the riders were in full Lycra.
  • + 5
 it isn't just that lycra is far more comfortable, it is also far more effective at removing moisture from your skin when you sweat (yes, i'm referring to xc riding here). i admit that tight clothing does not leave much room for modesty, but its effectiveness during a workout is unmatched. Scissors888 has it right. stop hateing haters, we all love the same sport!!
  • + 5
 When I ride, I always have a shammy on. If it's free-riding it's under the baggy stuff. If it's road or xc then it's full lycra. It's a question of keeping the jewels happy Razz

By the way the Garmin 500 is great not only for keeping data on your rides! I've used mine with Strava to create our trail map:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/8394926
  • + 8
 ok... so i guess we are not giving XC a makeover, point taken Frown lol
  • + 3
 I just took third in a 24 hour race, Lycra free! Just wore MTB shorts with the liner in it. Granted I was the minority tho.
  • + 7
 Lets see a review of bib nicker shorts and base layer under shirts. Cross season is upon us you know.
  • + 2
 who gives a toss what you wear will rideing. You can go riding in a santa clause costume for all i care .... as long as your haveing fun why should it matter ????
[Reply]
  • + 37
 Garmin Edge series GPS are straight up awesome! So much data at your finger tips... I prefer the 800 for it's mapping abilities but the 500 is a killer race unit being so much lighter & smaller.
  • + 5
 Ever used Strava? Greatest mapping tool that allows you to compete with your friends and local riders on timed and tracked "segments" i use it all the time and highly recommend to anyone with a gps device! Check it out and it will become addicting and best part is that it is FREE
  • + 5
 I can't believe this is the only comment about Strava. If you have a smart phone with GPS, why would you shell out $300 for a cycling computer? Strava gives you all the same data and much, much more for free. It also can introduce you to MTB trails you never knew where around you, plus you get to see how you stack up against others ... even local pros. So, whilee I love that dude's comment about "are you tired?" there's now a way to benchmark if your 'tired' is comparatively weak.
  • - 3
 too bad GPS is for shite in the trees were most people ride. can't agree with rollOver more, everyone has a gps in the pocket already pert much with new phones.
  • - 3
 Strava is only free if you already don't have a soul.
  • + 3
 Actually, Garmin's work just fine in the trees... They're far more accurate and have much better reception than cell phone GPS could ever hope to. Strava is awesome, and it's free for everyone... soulless or not.
  • + 1
 I've used both the 500 and 800. I kept the 800 for the mapping, bigger display, and BETTER RECEPTION! I don't know if it was just an issue with the particular 500 I had, but it seemed to take quite a bit longer to acquire satellites than the 800. I'll admit the 500 is way better for racing because of its size and has the same capabilities for tracking rides/races and comparing info with other Strava nerds. (Don't hate, I'm one of them!)

Rollover: It's worth getting the GPS unit because: 1) Using Strava for mobile devices kills their battery life. Rides longer than two hours... forget about it! 2) More accurate. 3) No HR, or if you're really going to geek out, cadence and power meter.
  • + 1
 Yeah, I sometimes agree with the "soulless" comment - it's a slippery slope with Strava. I do enjoy it though. As for GPS and adove's comments: I have a garmin and an smartphone with gps. I regularly use my iphone for long rides (4+ hrs) and have not run down my battery yet, as long as I start with it charged. Accuracy has not been an issue (for me) on roads or in the trees. Finally, if your smartphone has bluetooth you can use a HR monitor (wahoo). All are pretty good options, I'm just saying that you can accomplish the same with a smart phone.
  • + 1
 Anyone who thinks "soul" lies in the devices you use or the websites you frequent isn't only soulless... they're brainless.

Smartphone apps, and I've used them on a variety of occasions as well as ridden in a group with someone who was using one while I was using my Garmin, are not even close to accurate and don't even begin to match the functionality or accuracy of a Garmin unit. It's not even an opinion at this point, that's just fact... FFS there's Strava forums where users complain that the App users should have a seperate statistical accounting because the apps are so inaccurate. I did a ride with 2800 foot of climbing, the guy on an iPhone recorded 3700 feet???
  • + 0
 It's not the device - it's the mentality of chasing segments, leroy.

I will dispute your "fact" as I have both a garmin and an iphone 5 and run them simultaneously (why not). The elevations are definitely different (never by 30%+ as you've seen), but the distance and speed are identical. What functionality does a garmin offer that you can't get on a smartphone?
  • + 1
 Power.. left/right power... well calibrated compass, well calibrated thermometer, well calibrated altimeter, cadence without a f*cking 'dongleberry', the ability to not have GPS interuption or inaccuracy based on cell radio activity, durability... shit, the list goes on and on.

...and you can dispute whatever you like. Doesn't change the fact. Maybe you do shorter rides so the difference is less drastic, maybe you have smaller hills that make the difference less drastic, don't know... don't much care. It is however a fact that myself and thousands of other Strava users have experienced. Android is far less inaccurate but still not even close to Garmin accuracy levels.
  • + 3
 And the "mentality of chasing segments" is quite possibly the dumbest thing I've ever heard... Maybe you ride like a schoolgirl on her to way to her boyfriends house prior to Strava but everyone I know was out hammering hills and descents and long TT'ish flats long before we had anything more that POS cyclometers strapped to our bars.

If you don't like it and think it's soulless... that's the awesome thing about Strava... NO ONE SAYS YOU HAVE TO USE IT. Sitting around bitching about the soul of the site is retarded though... you either ride to ride hard and value the extra data or you're a sunday stroller who doesn't care about their times, neither has any more or less soul than the other and suggesting otherwise is straight up douchebaggery.
  • + 5
 Strava is freakin' awesome, so sick to be able to "compete" with the fastest people around Denver!
  • + 0
 Personally i hate strava because if one idiot times an illegal or secret trail then suddenly everyone else can find the trail easily.
  • + 6
 Personally, I hate the idiots building illegal 'secret' trails and protecting them like it's their sisters virginity more... Mountain biking, and cycling as a whole, are "inclusive" sports... This "exclusive" mentality of super secret trails is pretty well limited to high school kids and twenty somethings who think they're protecting their turf...
  • + 1
 Well all of our good trails are illegal and the rangers just love pulling them out so a gps location publicly available can only be a bad thing IMO. Rangers can find them, as well as anyone else which results in more trail publicity by clueless non locals.
  • + 1
 why bother with the expensive garmin when you can just get a free app for your smart phone, like endomondo. it does everything a garmin does, including heart rate monitor...and it almost seems more accurate.
  • + 0
 So what you're saying is you didn't bother to read any of the comments above yours... Garmins work MUCH better than any cell phones and you're dreaming if you think your phone is even close to as accurate as a Garmin.
  • + 1
 yeah badbadbradleydouche, i read MOST of the comments above, and it is app and phone specific. im just comparing my silly little iphone4s with the endomondo app (which in regard to elevations and distances, consults known map values) against an older garmin that i used to use....and i find that they are about the same. so, why would i spend ADDITIONAL cash on a garmin?? and btw, you sure are a rude ass.
  • - 3
 LMAO... Did I touch a nerve with your triffling little bitch ass???

It's a fact that phone GPS are not nearly as accurate... It's not a debateable situation, there's cell phone gps and then there's accurate gps. They operate on different frequency spectrums and are not even remotely comparable. For the heart rate data, the cadence data, the power data, elevation data, temperature data, and essentially every other bit of data that either device can produce, the Garmin is FAR superior. You being an ignorant bitch who's tight with the cash is a personal problem... if you don't value accurate data, cool... f*ck off and don't buy one. But to try and compare the two while claiming that the phone "almost seems more accurate" just further reinforces my point that you're just an ignorant bitch.

Now... go find a kitchen and stay off the internet before your feeble little brain overheats.
  • + 1
 go easy troll
  • - 2
 No trolling... just calling a spade a spade, or in this case, a dumb bitch a dumb bitch.
  • + 0
 Are you serious?![P=http://i0.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/original/000/005/545/OpoQQ.jpg size=m align=c][/P]

Please chill out guys! The review was thorough enough.
[Reply]
  • + 30
 Ride bikes, drink beer, read maps, f*ck Garmin. Wanna know if you rode hard enough? Are you tired? Yes? Ok, mission accomplished.
  • + 1
 All the new tech is cool and all, but this says it. Back to the basics.. Mtb 101!
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Hi Pinkbike!

I was wondering which shaving cream you recommend for my legs?
  • + 7
 We prefer Aveeno cream and cheap disposable razors.
  • + 1
 Just use shampoo and whatever razor you use for your face, it works awesome!
  • + 2
 Hahahaha Biketrials and Levy, awesome comments Big Grin
  • + 3
 Hairy legs work great more protection.
  • + 1
 Don't be girls, you need to wax that for pure aerodynamics.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 although specialized turns my cranks pretty well, I'm still wanting a Stans wheelset for my next build. Damn you Pinkbike for making me reconsider
  • + 2
 I have a set of these Rovals on my Stumpy Evo 29er and there are really just as good as PB says. Before I got the bike, I was considering replacing them with a set of Stans ZTR Flows...but these are sooo much better.

I've had 26" ZTR's laced to various hubs over the last couple of years and I can't imagine the 29" version being better than these Rovals.

Tubeless conversion is incredibly easy and requires nothing more than 2 bottles of sealant and a hand pump.
  • - 4
 you must not ride hard then, the roval traverse is just a re branded oem dt swiss wheel, they taco like a soft taco
  • + 5
 I just used them to race the Whole Enchilada Enduro in Moab...i feel like averaging 14-15mph over 23 miles of the roughest terrain on earth might just be a slight test of a wheels durability.
  • + 1
 I just built up a Stans wheelset (ZTR flows are on closeout, grab em while you can) and while I'm pretty happy with them, I'm starting to look at SPANK rims very seriously, you might give them a look.
  • + 2
 We've had great luck with Stans and Spank rims as well. The Spank feel the burliest, while the Stans feel the lightest.
  • + 3
 I rebuilt the wheels that came on my 2012, 2 month old Stumpy Evo 29er because the aluminium alloy nipples had already started seizing to the spokes, which also turned out to be the heavier plain gauge variety

on close inspection, found that the Roval Traversee rim (the same rim used on the tested wheelset) had a great shape / profile and weighed in just over 480 grammes each on my digital scales, which for a wide profile eyeletted 29er rim is surprisingly light, compared to the non-eyeletted Stan's ZTR rims in 29er sizes.

I was glad to have eyelets as you can take the wheel tension higher when building, making for a stronger more dynamic wheel.

I rebuilt the Roval rims using brass nipples and double butted Sapim spokes onto the original hubs, which actually dropped a little weight despite the switch to the heavier brass nipples, and have not touched the wheels ever since

running Specialized S-Works Purgatory 2.2" front and Control Captain 2.2" rear with Stan's sealant on Roval tape and Bontager valve cores and its a great performance wheelset at a low cost

once the rear hub cr*ps itself (they always do) I rebuild the rear rim onto a Hope Pro II Evo Wink


from talking to contacts the rim is made by Alex in Taiwan for Specialized, and the stock Stumpy comes with "Stout" hubs also made in TW for Specialized
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Those glasses look like Kennny Powers from eastbound and down. Which means they are awesome.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 Half the Pinkbike anti lycra, anti GPS tweeners, 20 and 30 something riders, will turn into 40yr old lycra wearing GPS using roadie and 29er XC riders. Just sayin'... it's ok,
  • + 4
 Phuck that noise!!! Im 40- don't own a road bike or ever plan to, those things are dangerous- have you ever driven a car were those fancy pants bikes belong?
  • + 2
 Agreed. Im almost 40 and have no plans to ever go 29er or lycra. EVER!
  • + 2
 48 and gave up the road bike after being punted into the weeds by mr motorist.
That was 25+ years ago.
I have zero intention of riding road in any form other than getting my mtb to the local trail head.
I am returning to my roots as a kid, and now ride down as my preferred direction.
Currently 170mm and looking at adding a full on DH. 29 holds no interest for me
I also have zero electronics (cell phone buried in pack for emergencies excepted)
Don't own any lycra and really have no interest in doing so. The 8 panel clip in chamois in my baggies do an exceptional job.
  • + 1
 Not always.
About to pass the half-century mark & moving more towards big FS bikes & doing less strenuous riding.
Having ridden mostly rigid & HT 26"/29" over the past 10 yrs on stuff like Burro Down, lotsa shuttled rides & several lift-assisted places has improved my flowiness over the chunk. However, it is hard work for an old man like me.. It's a helluva workout to keep up with (& pass lots of) those damn kids on their fancy FS bikes blasting the descents.

So I've decided to decrease the machismo factor of doing more with less, and increase my laziness factor.
More suspension & less skill! Bring it!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I have the exact pare of those smiths and i love them. The opticale vision/clarity is great and they are very comfortable on my face. They trully aren't that pricy due to the fact that they come with 3 lenses and of coarse work well. If you wear them a little of your face the (sweat drops on them wont occur)!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I'm 46, and ride a 26 Knolly V-Tach. Haven't tried a 29er, but just simply don't feel the need to. My brakes get a regular workout on most rides, so i don't see the benefit of a "faster" 29er wheel. The spandex...been there done that, not going back. By the way, Pinkbike didn't make these products, they are just the messenger....don't shoot the messenger. Have a good ride.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I love 29 ers, all you DH/26" nazis open your mind, not every shoe fits everyone the same. Respect peoples differences.I would shred most 26" trail riders on my 29" jumps and all. Enduro27 you're a moron, just because you don't like 29ers nobody else can ? Only old people with lycra ride 29ers? That's like saying only teenagers ride DJ bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I buy the cheapest open framed uv protective open lensed glasses I can, so I don't lose them in a tree somewhen, I wear lycra on my hard tail 'cause its comfy, and on the flip side I've got a big knob so I get a few smiles when I catch the ladies look! And 29rs are grippy but fuck me they climb slow And are as chuckable as a lump of snot! Just saying....
  • + 1
 It's all bike set up, I wouldn't try chucking an XC 29 with a long stem, narrow bars and steep geo., but an AM, short stem wide bars, burly wheels. And if you think they climb slow then your not in good shape.
  • + 1
 They climb slow because the bigger wheel diameter increases the gear ratio, when you are on climbs that cover 450ft Ascent in under half a mile you want something that accelerates quickly so you can keep front wheel on the ground over the rough stuff!
  • + 1
 true to a point but spinning uphill to fast burns you out too
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  • + 1
 have the edge 500 and pivlocks for road I cant see the point of either in mtb tbh, maybe the garmin for strava but its a bit expensive to have on your dh bike and I cant see ever needing glasses in xc unless its a bit muddy, much less sunglasses unless you're a treeless fireroad folk... gimma a 29er and id love to try that wheelset and both the garmin and pivlocks are awesome products, the garmin gps to see your hr/speed/cadence anywhere on the route after riding will change your training, the pivlocks fit me better than oakleys and theyre crazy light
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Chris king makes pretty reliable hubs. Been running mine for 14 years with zero issues and very little maintenance. 8 years ago I upgraded the shells to ISO with same internals. The harder you pedal the more it grabs. Pawls suck and break.
  • + 1
 not much relation to this article... that and there are much better hubs put there
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  • + 1
 With reference to the Lycra argument if you wear one of the newer generation like Royal MW365 slim fitted loose short there is no difference between a spandex/lycra short and and slim fit baggy short, that is proven. Each to their own but I'm just sayin
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  • + 1
 ridden a 29er last week. carbon frame and all the biz....proper fast machine! but the handling was kak! got on my voltage for the same dh trails...well more like xc with a down slope....and it really dragged its ass down the hill like it was a real effort. but the haddling was far better.
  • + 1
 said the same thing about every 29" i rode until i got on a specialized epic. the one thing I've always said about specialized is they seem to get those little geometry tweaks that make all the difference better than anyone.
  • + 1
 it was a specialized. not sure what one but was assured it was the top of the range racing machine
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  • + 4
 frameless glasses always been a bad idea in my head, crash onto face and dig into cheeks . . .
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  • + 2
 I ride in Pivlocks anytime I don't use goggles (anytime there is climbing). They never fog up, and protect your eyes from roost with the huge lens.
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  • + 1
 These are all for the Cross Country fellows, but the need for a GPS deminishes with anyone who has a smartphone. The Strava app works great for any thing you would get out of a GPS
  • + 1
 Having it mounted right there on the bar is way easier though. No one makes a bar mount for my GS3 so I have to keep getting it out of my pockets and taking gloves off, etc.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I wear better glasses than those and mine are from work! Some wicked dewalt safety glasses and look 10 times better than these pathetic waste of time!
I never used to wear them but one day I got hit in the eye by what I think was a fly! And I tell you what... I could have qualified for the Olympics British men's gymnastic team the backflip I did off my bike!! ( painful ) not recommend...... Just like these glasses!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Likeing the GPS. I do use my phone but it kills the battary
  • + 1
 The 500 does look ok, but the 800 is lovely with colour mapping, I have a 550T and think it will be going for an 800. Resolution and accuracy are my worry with the 800 though compared to the 550T
  • + 1
 When you're out riding put it in airplane mode. Switch it off if you need to check your messages, etc... Saves battery like crazy.
  • + 1
 Does that save much on a iphone tho ?
  • + 2
 Doesn't Aeroplane Mode turn off GPS though?
  • + 1
 turn on airplane mode, then go back and switch just GPS back on.
  • + 1
 get this app called easy battery saver. it kills all the unnecessary tasks and actually saves the little battery i have
  • + 1
 If you're using an iPhone...Airplane mode also disables the GPS functionality.

To accomplish the same thing on an iPhone, I believe you can go into the "General Settings" and turn the cellular network off. This will disable the phone and data, but will keep the GPS on.
  • + 1
 Get an old school generator for a light and hook it up to the phone.. Plus youll get extra workout to offset the lower rotating weight of those Rovals! Win-win!
  • + 1
 @ six66...that may just be a genius business idea.

You could market it as a combo friction generator / resistance trainer.
  • + 1
 I use my Blackberry, it's got a true GPS unlike iPhone which uses cell triangulation. I can run it 6 plus hrs easy with Endomondo app.
  • + 2
 Good to know a Blackberry is still good for something.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Huh, I wonder how they got a specialized roval hub to work? Mine practically seized up after one ride, along with everyone else who had one spec'd on their bike and specialized wouldn't do anything about it. Too bad they made such a junk hub since everything else is pretty spot on. Nice job.....?
  • + 5
 Did you figure out what the issue was? We've had nothing but great luck with the DT internals over a decade of using different hubs. There is only four pieces in the clutch: two star ratchets and two springs, plus the drive ring in the hub, so it should be simple to see what went wrong.
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  • + 1
 Racing a mellow course DH race next weekend...we'll see how the evo 29er does
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Try ski tracks or bike tracks gps app for iPhone , It's a $2 gps that's works great and with NO data.
  • + 1
 lol the free app
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  • + 1
 I got my last sunglasses free with MBUK magazine. Exactly £0.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Smith is gonna get sued by Joo Janta...
  • + 1
 doubtful, they sound like a small company with not enough money to sue a big company like smith...
  • + 1
 hahaha, Joo Janta is a fictional company from "the hitchhikers guide to the galaxy." Smith is having a little fun with the "impossibly black" style.
  • + 1
 OH! haha I read the book and everything surprised I didn't catch that, thats great!
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  • + 1
 roval hubs are a fu*king shit!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Is that roval front set up for rim brakes or something? / o /
  • + 1
 Haha, I noticed that too
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  • + 1
 Why was this reposted?
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  • + 0
 Pivlock V2, best glasses I've even owned for riding....
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  • + 0
 One AM 29er. Norco Judan rips up trails nicely.
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  • + 0
 Was turned off by the mention of a 29er anything.
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  • + 0
 The picks get more and more useless !! Frown
[Reply]
  • - 3
 29er in my garage too
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  • - 3
 So, how many people here actually ride 29ers?
  • + 7
 here too...
  • + 15
 Right here
  • + 7
 hah sorta back fired on ya' there, the-mountainbart-experience
  • + 0
 Don't own one yet but do ride them when i get the chance. A Trance X may be on the shopping list this summer.
  • + 0
 so its more of a question on who doesnt ride a 29er
  • + 1
 Damn straight.
  • + 5
 I feel like 85 percent of the people on this website have tried one and loved it but cant confess because it lowers their "cool" points on Pinkbike. Thats what its all about, right?
  • + 2
 gimme one and I"ll ride one! Would love to try one out.
  • + 12
 I don't ride one, have tried 4 or 5, the Niner being the nicest, but it just does not compare to a 26" bike when you wanna thrash it (which is what bikes are for in the end of the day).
Felt like taking a monster truck to a WRC rally....
  • + 1
 Spark twentyniner pro :-)
  • + 1
 edge 700 too :-)
  • + 0
 Yep, me to.
  • + 0
 And after 27"5, wtf new range of wheels? Frown
  • - 2
 29er fan right here
  • - 1
 right here...
  • - 1
 Here too - Scott scale expert, looking to get a santa cruz tallboy lt (maybe carbon).

Lol at the people going around neg propping all the people who admit riding 29ers (truly sad). And @ people who say you can't thrash a 29er, you just need a little more enthusiastic body english! But by all means, enjoy your 26ers, no problem for me (when I'm over taking you AHHAHAHAHAHA!) Que my neg props!
  • - 12
 wow there are a lot of slow old lycra wearing guys on 29ers replying here, one can not be a truly fast and aggressive rider on a 29er
  • + 3
 Sorry Enduro27 your comment points out quite clearly how truly fast and aggressive rider you are Smile Because if you were one and tried a 29er you would see the deep well of potential and realize at the same time how much more guts, strength and skill it takes to use the advantage of bigger wheels. Im not saying it's better, I just say it is... simply faster
  • + 0
 here. i have a epic comp with the same wheelset.. awesome stuff
  • + 4
 To really ruin the game for some: if you can't scrub, manual, do some world cup size airs, whip it from nearly every stone on your local trails, pick up air anywhere you can then just shut it. Stop telling people that they cant do this and that on 29er when you struggle with basics on 26er.

Now 650B is an incredible bullshit, like 15mm axle or 1.25 steerer, as it is simply only half of an inch larger radius, while a 29er is 1,5" larger radius - a significant, change-making increase. Sure the clock will prove it faster, and that is the only place tou will notice the difference.

Still I recommend any potential 29er buyer - make sure you made your skills homework on BMX or 26. Its not any easier, the only easy part is ridimg straight on flat
  • + 15
 The person that rides a different category of bike and clothes that function best for that type of riding is not the enemy. I'll pedal any bike with whatever functional clothes available with a smile on my face.
  • + 0
 @ bike98826 You are a legend. Absolute win.

@ Enduro27 you'd better be careful mate, or you're gonna hurt some one feelings!

4.bp.blogspot.com/_pB9f0ROhwI4/S7zdFlp7zsI/AAAAAAAABIQ/8z51lM5jIsc/s1600/grumpy+kid.jpg

I'm 23 ("old"?). I think without too much ego that I'm pretty fast ("slow"?) and I don't necessarily think that dressing like you're headed to a linkin park gig makes you any faster - although some times it is appropriate! ("lycra wearing"?). You're full of it mate if you say that you can't be truly aggressive and fast on a 29er. www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLirh0gJrps


go ride a BMX if you're sooo hardcore
  • + 1
 Gotta a Transition Trans AM 29 for XC/AM/commuting. Yeah I have more fun riding my V10 and Nomad but it just makes things interesting on a 29er HT and it puts a smile on your face when you're shreddin some single track.
  • + 8
 Here, Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc - now thinking of picking up a carbon hardtail too... Not old, not even 30 yet. Never owned a road bike.
  • + 5
 Clearly Enduro27, no one can ride a 29er hard. You are SO correct.... Never mind the Cedric Gracia, he hardly counts.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohCMW2zHOo0
  • + 1
 here too. I'm on the North Shore and love the things.
  • + 3
 Eee, in this movie Cedric looked like a fly covered in a ton of crap. Niners can fly very well but not as stylish as 26ers. Lets dont get over excited here. After few attempts to whip that cow, I learned that Cedeic must have given all he had to make that bike do those things. Innertia of those wheels straightens up the bike as hell. Not only it is hard to whip but also when you finaly make it, it is really hard to get back. I rhink it is a bit stupid to try to show that niners jump well, it's like trying to prove that a WRC car can drive on tarmac as well as sport street cars... Niners jump well but they shine on the ground, so lets make the best out of it.

I also hate people biying super light, wheels to niners that they know that will be wobbly. Then they put some XC semi slicks, while on 26" bike they had some fat knobby bitches. Stop that nonsense make the best out of the advantage, put on fatknobbies and wide, stiff rims, why compromise? to prove that 29ers are so damn faster on fireroads?

There's so much BS hype ruining awesome bike type...
  • + 8
 I ride my 29er with skate lid, goggles and no gloves. Does that make the fashion police happy? Or am I missing the one fly piece of clothing that will get me Pinkbike teenager approval? Please let me know. My life has no meaning otherwise
  • + 1
 Leelau, No, not until you get rid of the 29ers.
  • + 1
 let's not get speed and style mixed up now
  • + 2
 29er for me! Stumpy Evo.
  • + 1
 But according to the Pinkbike wisdom speed == style. So confusing
  • + 0
 @ leelau - could not have said it better!!!
  • + 1
 hahaha enduro you called mike levy old and slow Big Grin
  • + 1
 enduro, you my friend are not particularly intelligent...
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