Random Products Part Six - Interbike 2012

Sep 24, 2012 at 11:52
by Mike Levy  

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Stan s ZTR Flow EX

Stan's Flow EX rim
Although not specifically designed for DH use, the long-awaited Flow EX rim has been developed with the help of the Athertons, so we're expecting it to be up to the task. The new rim's sidewalls are slightly thicker than found on the original Flow rim, meaning that it should be better at resisting denting and flat-spotting, and the thickness at the spoke bed has gone up 33% as well. Stan's knew that the rim's relatively light weight - the 26" version weighs just 490 grams - would make it a top choice for many of gram counting DHers, and so they have increased its interior width to 25.5mm in order for it to offer more support for high-volume DH tires. They also tweaked their patented bead socket shape for the same reason, allowing riders to run low pressure without having to worry about burping air in a hard corner. The new Flow EX is available in 26", 27.5" and 29" sizes, as well as in complete wheelsets that can be configured to fit any dropout standard. Will we see the Flow EX used by World Cup riders, or will the Athertons and others be using a still-newer rim with a taller profile?
www.notubes.com




Norco Fluid 6.1

Norco Fluid 6.1
We recently spent time on Norco's new, 27.5"-wheeled Range Killer B, and while the 160mm travel bike was a lot of fun, we decided to take a look at a more all-round machine while visiting the Canadian company's Interbike booth. The 26"-wheeled, 120mm travel Fluid 6.1 shown here looks like a good choice for someone who needs a machine that will allow you to get to the summit of your local hill without having an aneurysm, but should also offer a lively ride on the way back down. Vertically-challenged riders who have struggled to find a medium-travel bike that offers enough stand over clearance will be stoked to hear that the Fluid is offered in an XS size, an option that Norco says will work well for a 4'9" tall pilot. The Fluid lineup is spread between the $1400 USD entry point to the $2170 USD 6.1 seen here.

Norco Fluid 6.1

The 120mm travel Fluid series uses the same A.R.T. rear suspension layout as on their longer travel bikes, albeit in a more compact form. The design is a variation of the Horst Link that Norco has tuned to have slightly more rearward axle path than what is found on many other Horst Link designs. The goal is one that is talked about often: better square edge performance, which in turn can result in a bike that carries good speed over rough terrain. The bike's rearward axle path can also be used to tune-in a certain amount of anti-squat by way of chain tension, a tool that is used to improve the bike's pedalling abilities.
www.norco.com





Teva Pivot

Teva consults Crank Brothers
Teva worked with Crank Brothers to bring their new Pivot shoe to life, taking a step towards integration that hadn't yet been done when talking about skate-styled clipless shoes. We weren't allowed to remove the shoes from their glass bubble (which explains the shoddy photos), but Teva says that they are quite light for the category that they fall into. The lack of heft comes from a shortened composite nylon shank that doesn't run under the toes or heel, as well as rubber cutouts on the sole that save further grams while also aiding traction for those hike-a-bikes sections. Teva was also quick to point out that the Pivot features a lower volume interior compared to a non-clipless skate-style shoe, a change that they found mandatory due to a clipped-in ridder being able to apply both downward and upward force. Another difference between the two types of shoes can be seen in the tongue, with the Pivot's forgoing the usual thick, water absorbant filling that is found on most skate shoes - these have been designed to dry out quickly.

Teva Pivot

The Pivot's cleat mounting point in quite interesting, with a lightweight aluminum plate integrated into the inset area. This has been done to keep the 'wings' used on Crank Brothers' pedals from eating into the shoe's sole. The left and right edges of the inset also sport a section of stiffer material that resists wear while also providing some extra support on the pedal body. The Pivot is still a ways out from being available to the public, with a forecasted release date of next July, but you can expect them to retail for approximately $150 USD when the time does come. Oh, and they are still compatible with every other clipless pedal.
www.teva.com






MRP

Updated MRP 1X guide
Single ring riders who don't need downhill-level protection should check out MRP's updated 1X guide. The minimalist unit uses only an upper slider piece - there is no lower guide or ring protection - to keep the chain from derailing, and attaches to the bike via an updated mount that looks to be sturdier than the previous design. A urethane sleeve has also been added around the slider's rear joint, likely cutting down on a bit of noise and wear. The new 1X is available in direct-mount, E-mount, bottom bracket, and seat tube compatible versions. We've spent nearly a full season on MRP's current 1X guide, using it on our single ring equipped trail bike on some pretty rowdy terrain, and have come away surprised at how well the simple unit performs. Having said that, the 1X is clearly not intended to be used on a downhill bike.
www.mountainracingproducts.com





Alpinestars at Interbike

Alpinestars 2013
The Italian company had a number of new products to show us, but it was their Tech Air Race Suit that we found ourselves getting the most excited about. No, it has nothing to do with their mountain bike lineup (although some of their protectives take styling cues from their longstanding involvement in motorsports), but it is just too cool to not mention. Designed specifically for MotoGP racers, the suit employs twin pressurized gas cylinders and an extremely small pyrotechnic charge that combine to nearly instantly inflate the suit's two shoulder-mounted air bags. How fast does it all happen? It takes just 45 milliseconds for the suit's five accelerometers - one in each arm and leg, as well one within the processor housing - to go from waiting for action to sensing danger and having the air bags fully deployed, which is about half the time that it takes from the rider to go from experiencing trouble to impact. In the event of a crash, the accelerometers sense that a fast, unnatural movement is taking place, and the suit is even constantly 'thinking', with the same accelerometers transferring data to the main unit, hidden in the shoulder hump, every 2 milliseconds. It is brought online when a magnetic connection on the zippered closure is joined together, with a small strip of LED lights on the right cuff telling the rider if it is armed or not, and its status can even be monitored via a smart phone with Blue Tooth.

It took Alpinestars eleven years of development to get the Tech Air Race Suit to this point, with it now being available to the public for approximately $5,000 USD - this level of safety and technology certainly doesn't come cheap. Plan on doing a spot of two-wheeled racing at 200mph? Then the Tech Air Race Suit's asking price may not be such a big deal. We found ourselves wondering if the technology employed in the it could someday also be utilized in the mountain bike world, but Alpinestar's Nic Sims explained that it would be a tricky task to map the very dynamic movement of a downhiller (we tend to move around on our bikes much more than a motorcycle racer) in order to define the algorithms required to tell the suit's processor the difference between 'all good' and 'oh shit, this is going to hurt'.

Alpinestars at Interbike

The A-Line pant may look like a standard moto pant, but a closer inspection reveals that these are from from being hot, heavy, and overbuilt bottoms. Designed specifically for use on a downhill bike, they feature air mesh sections and thinner fabric than what you'll find in the motorized word, as well as a trimmer fit that makes more sense on a bike that requires pedalling every now and then. Compact expansion panels in the knees allow for flexibility and room for pads without having to have excess material, and two Velcro-equipped waist straps let you dial in the fit. We didn't put the A-line pant on, but holding it up revealed that it is substantially lighter than a true moto pant. Colour options include yellow, gray, red/black, violet/white, and the blue marine model shown here.

Alpinestars at Interbike

We reviewed Alpinestars' Manual short awhile back and found it to be a good option, but in need of some refinement. They have done just that for 2013, addressing all of our complaints to greatly improve this mid-weight short. Their fly gets upgraded from a Velcro job that always seemed to open up at the worst times to a proper zippered closure, and the short's side pockets are now deep enough to be useful. An accordion-styled rear panel allows for some movement in the material, while vents across the front of the thighs should let a bit of air through. One detail that we particularly like is the small metal D-ring that provides a good place to attach a lift pass. The Manual can be had in the green colour shown here, or you can pick from chocolate, black, or dark gray options.
www.alpinestars.com





SDG and the Shibuya district
Looking for some flash? SDG had a number of their saddles done up in a mix of neon and black colours that are sure to attract some attention to your ride. The 'Shibuya Collection' takes its name from the fashion-centric district near the Shibuya Station, one of Tokyo's busiest railway stations. We're picturing one of these saddles looking great on an otherwise murdered-out bike, but what do you think?
sdgcomponents.com





Marzocchi's 888 and a new DH fork?
With a total of thirteen forks in their catalogue, Marzocchi has a trimmer, more focused suspension lineup for 2013. Some of you will be disappointed to learn that the 66 range has been dropped, although three variations of the venerable 888 are still present - we can't picture the Italian brand without also picturing their long-standing, 200mm travel DH fork. The 888 RC3 EVO V.2 Titanium tops the range, with both a titanium coil spring and titanium hardware from stock. Externally adjustable rebound, low-speed compression, high-speed compression, and volume allow the user to dial the fork to their liking, and its nickel-treated 38mm stanchions look slick as snot.

While 2013 looks to be a rebuilding year for Marzocchi, there are whisperings of an entirely new downhill fork to be debuted within the next two seasons. No, it most certainly will not be a re-released Shiver, despite what we were told last year, but will actually be a right-side-up fork that utilizes a new damper system. Word is that it won't be replacing the 888, but rather slot above it in their fork hierarchy. Marzocchi isn't sharing any details beyond those facts, but we're eager to see the approach they take with the new fork.
www.marzocchi.com

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85 Comments

  • + 38
 New fork from 'Zoke huh. Excited me thinks.
  • - 28
 Don't be... Everyone who was anyone at Zocci bailed for DVO with Bryson.
  • + 43
 If "Everyone who was anyone at Zocci bailed for DVO" then its better for marzocchi , new blood!.
there is no one that is not replaceable!, still would pick a 66 over a 36 any day!
  • + 13
 bombas>foxes all day
  • + 18
 Ive had 55s, 66s and now 888s, and many other marzocchi forks, best brand, all really plush and progressive, shame they dropped the 66 though, was a masterpiece
  • - 11
 When 'everyone' includes everyone from customer support to product development to managment to your overseas production... no, it's not replaceable. I've always ridden Zocchi but they're heading downhill in a bad way unfortunately.
  • + 19
 'No, it most certainly will not be a re-released Shiver'.

Why the hell not??? A new Shiver is what we all want!!! Come on Marzo, give the buying public what they want, a 2013 or 2014 Shiver!!!!!!
  • + 5
 bombas>foxes all day: did that and I'm not going back. My 66 rc3 evo ti is a bit heavier but the adjustabillity is insane, performance stellar, looks better and just gives you pleasant feeling when you look down and see those super wide crowns that you know wont disapoint you. Plus you get 3 years full warranty for less money.
  • + 8
 badboyleroy why are you making these claims when you have no idea what you are talking about? What you are saying is pure speculation. Knock it off. Besides, you think a handful of dudes at Marz. are the only people in the worl educated in suspension design?

Secondly........ I predict........ the new fork will be ... AIR.
  • + 10
 It's not speculation, it's pure FACT... Bryson is starting DVO with pretty much everyone who mattered at Zocchi, all the way down to Ronnie the tech... Their manufacturing has been moved out of the Teneco factories into their shock production facilities... Maybe you should get some facts yourself before you accuse someone else of speculation. You fanboys can neg prop me all you want, but facts are facts and the fact is that it's never good for a company when pretty much everyone who made the company in the first place bails out. There was no smooth hand-off from one person to the next, everyone who mattered at Marzocchi MTB just bailed out and Zocchi has had to scramble to find replacements. Never a recipe for success.
  • - 4
 I've got to say I'm happy the 66 has gone. Had a 66 air fork with the turn down and it constantly turned its self down leaving me with 4 inches of travel mid trail. I got it repaired at marz' and it still happened. Poopy fork in my opinion, totem for the win.
  • - 3
 i like marzocchi and the 66 was a great fork, i came close to buying one but i know too many people that have blown marzocchi dampers
1> my old 888 rc3's
2> my brothers same model
3> my mate from uni, same model
4> friend from back home 44 micro
i have one friend that has had 888s who has had them for around 2/3 years without issue

because of this i now have fox 36 180s

i know i will get abuse for this but when dampers cost 130 a go and i know 4 people that have blown them up (some more than once) i cant really justify spending hundreds of pounds on it

hopefully this new fork will be a return to reliability for zoke
  • + 5
 People who left Marzocchi did so mainly because they didn't like the direction Tenneco was heading in with the brand. It may be that they have reversed that direction now and they're certainly playing catch-up. Time will tell if the brand will survive. Nevertheless, I'm curious to see what DVO comes up with.
  • + 9
 I have bomber z1's best forks ever!
  • + 1
 Badboy im not trying to argue with you. And Im not a fanboy... But it sounds like either you have inside info, or you are speculating. Either way, I don't think it means for sure that Marzo is doomed. THAT is unarguably speculative.
  • + 2
 I will also add that the forks they have been making since 2010 have been excellent, getting better every year. They could do worse than to keep making them like that so I don't know why you think that a bunch of dudes walking away from their desks means the place implodes.
  • + 5
 Tenneco = automotive = really boring place for engineers who like to fettle and explore at the front of their game. My guess is that is why they left. However, automotive works.... Since 2010, Zocchi has turned out practically service free products with 95% performance with no mucking about tuning every week...

I'll be really interested to see whether moving to Hodaka from Suntour has an effect on the quality. Unfortunately, I am reluctant to be one of the guinea pigs...
  • + 0
 "A new Shiver is what we all want!!! Come on Marzo, give the buying public what they want, a 2013 or 2014 Shiver!!!!!!".
99% of people hated the Shivvers twisting, and their weight. Unless it's a fight for more travel with bigger wheels(650b might make it to DH)I can't see any reason why Marzochhi would bring out a Shivver.
DVO guys are making an inverted fork, but probably mainly because it's way cheaper not having to get a lowers casting for their first fork.
  • + 1
 @NoSkidMarks. Twisting?? Dude. Have you ever personally ridden a pair of DC Shivers? Bolt the front wheel in correctly (Don't laugh, its actually easy to put it in wrong) and it wont twist at all unless you are in the process of taco-ing your rim. And weight? really? Unless you are uber serious about racing (and 99% of riders aren't) then once they are on the bike and you are riding downhill I challenge you to actually notice the weight. Ok, so they are a few pounds heaver than the latest stuff nowadays, well they're and old fork and I'm sure new ones would be at less of a weight disadvantage. Anyway the reason Shivers are still talked about after being out of production for so long isn't because of all their perceived flaws, it all comes down to one factor: Awesome buttery smooth performance. All my mates who have ridden my '03 Shivers down our local trails have commented they wish their forks felt as smooth and supple (and they are currently riding 888RC2X's, Fox 40RC2's, WC Boxxers to name but a few).
  • + 1
 I actually was in the 1% that didn't mind the twisting, but I'm light, and not that powerful. I found it worked like a steering damper for me. But everyone else thought they were too flexy, and although yes a lot of those people were just parroting what those powerful enough to notice the flex, those powerful enough had just cause. I also think the current weight obsession has gone to far, but old Shivvers really are too heavy for today. With Manitou having the hex axle patented, and DVO abut to patent some other stiff concept, I really don't see the need for inverted. Marz could/should maybe just go back to 36mm stanchions, but there's no sound unsprung weight debate really for mountain bike forks, as it depends where the springs and oil are sitting.
New Shivvers would fail, the market wouldn't buy them, even though Marz would make them look good, once the power houses said they flex, it'd be all over.
Dorradoes are meant to be brilliant, you don't hear to much about them. Maybe it's just the price.
  • + 1
 Defo agree with you on the Dorado's. An awesome fork, probably the best available to the public right now but just too much $$$$
[Reply]
  • + 14
 I must admit never been more stoked for marzocchi! Smile
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Nice job Teva, hope your shoes don't fall apart like Crank bros pedals do
  • + 7
 My crank bros pedals didnt fall apart. Admittedly they needed rebuilding after their first ride...but all the broken bits stayed inside!
  • + 3
 I haven't had to do anything to my Mallet yet, but when I do I know they are very easy to service
  • + 1
 I didn't have to service mine .... All I had to do was pick the bits up off the trail ....
  • + 2
 I didnt have to service mine either it was just a nice easy time unscrewing the sheared axle
[Reply]
  • + 7
 "Teva consults Crank Brothers..." 'Nuff said.

Clearly Teva is clueless...
[Reply]
  • + 3
 the 66 will be on its way out for the same reason that giant are dropping the faith, in zocchis case

1> the 888 is pretty light these days so weight is less of a concern

2> there isnt the demand, the 55 has been stretched to 170mm travel so there is a huge weight penalty for 10mm more travel, not worth it

3>selling more 55's and 888's instead of adding 66's to their production line saves costs and means that they will be able to sell their forks a little cheaper

it all adds up....
  • + 3
 no, everything will get more expensive
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Got to say, from the Aurum down, Norco are making some seriously good looking bikes nowadays. Would love to have a go on the Sight - sounds like a ripper.
  • + 2
 I agree I actuall love the aurum :L
  • + 1
 Yeah i've owned norco fluids for the last 2 years. They would of been great bikes if they didn't always snap.... snapped 3 in under 2 years and norco have declined my warranty.... good one
  • + 1
 I was able to test most of the bikes from they're new lineup. I must say they've come a LONG way since their 2009 frame cracking days. These bikes ride so. good. All of them. And at 2200 with a full Fox setup and a legit suspension platform? That Fluid is mint for any trail rider on a budget.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I have been around the mountain for a long time now and had many different brands and Marzocchi is by far the best, you can work on it and that adds value to your purchase.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Nice to see a wider No Flats rim, not overly keen on my internal width of 21mm Mavics...
  • + 3
 Been running my flow ex for DH for 2 months, no problem at all with a tube!
  • + 1
 Had Flow ZTR rims for 2 years. Didn't have to true them once and the only time I lost air was a bizarre accident where a stick wedged itself between the rim and the tire, even then it was a slow leak. I strongly recommend Stans rims to anyone.
[Reply]
  • + 7
 I want those SDG's...and a new 888 please!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Are there any sticky-rubber, mtb-specific, non-clipless shoes that are lighter-weight than the average 5.10 Freerider or the Teva link? I'd like to see a shoe that had almost a road bike shoe upper with a wider foot platform.
  • + 1
 trust me, I want the same thing, but thats probably not going to happen just due to how few selections there are... (I;m keeping my fingers crossed though)
[Reply]
  • + 2
 40 or new marzocchi? hmm.. which will end up costing more? the 40 RAD is going to be hellishly expensive most likely as would a fork above the 888
  • + 7
 Nothing wrong with the Fox fork. I don't run it but any suspension gurus will tell you the fork is seamless on the inside and the damping is the bees knees. Also, you still can't look past the Dorado. Those things are amazing! Don't listen to anyone talk about flex, if you go fast enough to feel any flex, you should be on the world cup circuit or a professional suspension tech making your own forks. And me, I run a boxxer wc. Love it, it does the job I need it too do as a DH fork. Though I find I run the PSI a lot lower than what I was told too buy the guys at Suspensionwerx. I run 35psi and they told me I should be running 55 to 60psi. I did one day at Whistler and my arms were killing me, I go fast, but not world cup fast.
  • + 6
 ...he was commenting on the price of DH forks these days, not which one is better quality. Which I agree, the price of even the mid range DH forks seems like they are going to be out of reach soon for most people.
  • + 2
 lets back track here... 35psi in a world cup!??? what do you weigh? I weigh around 75kg and I also run my pressure lower but thats 50 rather than 55psi and even the difference of 5 psi is very noticable and over 5% difference in terms of sag. The only way i could see you having sore arms after a day in whistler at that pressure would be if it was constantly bottoming out.
  • + 4
 your air gauges probably show different values
  • + 1
 a fork above a 888 is not necesserily going to be expensive the top teir 888 is costly as it uses exotic materials such as nickel and titanium, if it was an air spring fork as many suggest it will be it would remove the cost of a ti spring( can be around £200) from the cost of the fork, sure there would be air internals to throw in instead but it may not be as expensive as you may expect
  • + 0
 this is true hopefully the current one will drop in price, as a 888 owner I can say theyre an amazing fork and they require next to zero service... hopefully marz will make an inverted soon I want the marzocchi style damping with the dorado flex (aka compliance) the 888 is too stiff torsionally for my weight IMO
  • + 1
 @alazamanza & finnrambo:
Yeah right, air is cheaper than titanium... except that carbon is also cheaper than aluminum and yet the identical frames out of carbon material are at least 1000$ more, so your logic doesn't apply at all.
Also inflation tells me, the prices are most certainly rising.
  • + 0
 where'd you get your info that carbon is cheaper then alloy?
  • + 2
 ^super sarcasm alert ahahh
[Reply]
  • + 0
 really they dropped the 66 line? what in the flying F**K, the 55 line has proved to be a reliability nightmare thus far.
they worked so hard to get their reputation back after it went to shit a few years back and now they are falling again.
looks like I will be looking at a different manufacture for my fork and shock for 2013
  • + 1
 I have a 2010 55RC3, I have thrashed the crap out of it, and changed the oil once in 2.5 years, 3 * 2 week trips to the alps, biking every weekend... reliability nightmare? Not for me.

Fox however... if I got a pound for every time I saw a fox with oil pissing out the seals, or with the anodizing worn off because they can't fit their bushings properly, or locked out to half travel because the float chamber is leaking or..... etc I'd be able to afford a new DH bike every trip to the alps.
  • + 1
 I had a 2008 and a 2010 55 that constantly had issues, maybe you got lucky, even my 2011 888 had issues. Fox, dont even get me started haha, my buddy got rid of in 09 40 because of the leaky seals and has a 2010 36 that can hold oil, when it wants to..
  • + 1
 my 2008 55 works just fine for me. only needs new seals after 1 and a half seasons worth of use
[Reply]
  • + 2
 i love my BOMBER.. i got it since 2008 and still in tip-top shape, i only change my stanchions last 2 months.. hope there will be good reviews from the newer models Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ive never tried the flow rims before but does anyone know if those are just stickers that can be peeled off or actually painted on the rim ?
  • + 1
 Stickers clearly.
  • + 1
 stickers. Also, contrary to the article, Stan's usage chart for their rims gives these 3 out of 5 for downhill usage, the first rim that's gotten anything in that category, even if Sabrina used the old flows.
  • + 4
 Clearly? If it was that clear to me i wouldnt of asked . Thx
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Dam no more 66???? What is wrong with marz. That 55 platform should have been scrapped or updated. 44 who the hell riding that thing?? New dh fork on the way oooooo let me get my connect ready. It doesnt matter anyway because Avalanche is making 888 cartridges.
  • + 3
 This might come as a shock to you...but there exists a world outside of downhill... and the 2013 55 has up to 170mm of travel I believe. However, I do think they should have kept the 66 and limited it to two models, budget and top end.
  • + 1
 I've been thinking of get some 44's for my transAM
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Cannot go wrong with bang for the buck Boxxer. Been rocking the 2010 since Dec 2009.
  • + 1
 Try something else for a while, then return to your Boxxer and see how you feel.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Those 888's are wicked nice! And I gotta say I'm intreaged to see what this new fork will be like!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Road the new 2013 marzocchi evo this season. Lots of time put in to adjustments but once i was dialed in sooo plush!!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 upside down is right side up.... check any motorcycle, MX or Moto GP
  • + 5
 The reason for inverted forks in MX is the amount of travel. The lowers can only take so much stanchion before you have to start adding material below the axle; eventually you can't make a proper corner as you're dragging lowers on every turn and smashing them into rocks. If you have the stanchions sliding into the upper portion of the fork instead, you can have more travel. The downside is torsional weakness but it's a price that they have to pay. Giant axles help but that is less acceptable in the MTB world as weight is a bigger concern.
  • + 1
 ^ makes sense, the other thing I add to this is the Sprung weight of lowers with oil in them, having inverted forks eliminates some of this weight but is also the reason for the Fox fit cartridge, less weight in the lowers = better small bump compliance/
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Just bring the 66 back!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'M LOOKING FOR A SADDLE WITH A BUNCH OF STUPID COLORS.....ANYONE SEE ONE?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Marizocchi looks like they've gone back to their original graphics. I like this.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Those SDGs are lookin soooo sick!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 those saddles are sex... wish my bike could pull off that color scheme.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Air 888 maybe?
  • + 1
 They failed last time they tried an air 888.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I'm likin those flows Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 lets take a look at the new Black Market Roam
[Reply]
  • + 1
 zocchi finally releasing ti nitride?????
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Who is "DVO" that badbadleroybrown was talking about?
  • + 1
 Some folks from Marzocchi left and started their own suspension company, DVO, initially with some help from SR Suntour (like infrastructure, manufacturing machines, that sort of stuff - it's not some wicked Suntour project). Smile
  • + 1
 any forks in production ?? curious and always stoked to hear that there are new players ibn the suspension world .
  • + 1
 By now - none yet. Word is if they show a DH fork, it would be a USD one, like the Manitou Dorado. Smile ))
[Reply]
  • - 3
 Marzocchi look like they have maybe gone turned shit again Frown
[Reply]

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