SRAM Development and Training Center Tour

Nov 6, 2012 at 19:55
by Mike Levy  



SRAM XX1 in Germany

Views: 21,999    Faves: 74    Comments: 2

Filmed and edited by Victor Lucas

SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.

SRAM Development and Training Center

Unless you're a history buff or in the ball bearing industry, Schweinfurt, Germany, probably isn't a familiar location. Since the late 1800s, when Freidrich Fischer invented a machine for mass producing ball bearings, this river-side Bavarian township has been at the forefront of the world's bearing production. Schweinfurt also played a role in the early days of the bicycle industry – Sachs began manufacturing the Torpedo freewheel hub here in 1903. After suffering heavy losses during World War II, the town rebuilt during the Allied occupation, going on to become the manufacturing hub that it is today.

How does this relate to the modern day mountain bikes that we ride? In 1997, SRAM moved in and acquired Sachs, improving their own European distribution and adding manufacturing clout, a much needed shot in the arm for the American company that was battling to find a stronger foothold in the
drivetrain market. The Schweinfurt location now serves a vital role not only in the European market but also worldwide as their Development and Training Center, otherwise known as SRAM DTC. The DTC facility is just one of sixteen locations, spread across nine countries, that SRAM calls home. While only a fraction of SRAM's employees are located in Schweinfurt (130 of 2500 people who work for SRAM worldwide), it is an integral part of the entire operation - not only are European dealer services run through DTC, but it is also the main location for drivetrain development. This includes all stages of product evolution, from designing, to in-house manufacturing of prototypes, to lab testing. It is also under the DTC roof that SRAM's XX 2 x 10 drivetrain was developed, as well as where the soon-to-be released XX1 eleven-speed group was conceived and born.

SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.
SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.

European Dealer Service Direct

While much of SRAM's drivetrain development takes place within the DTC building, the Schweinfurt location also serves as home base for their European DSD (Dealer Service Direct) operations. This includes service and warranty issues, where products are reconditioned by technicians at dedicated workstations, each equipped with tools and supplies for any issue that might arise. Saying that the men in this room are well versed on the ins and outs of SRAM, RockShox, and Avid componentry would be quite the understatement. Shops in need of technical support, or those who are just looking for an update on a service item can call and speak directly to a technician via Bluetooth headsets that each man wears. The DSD area is also home to the classroom work stations where SRAM teaches dealers and mechanics how to service their products. Eight work stations, complete with repair stands and drain tanks, allow students to learn how to work on everything from the most basic RockShox fork all the way up to the latest BoXXer, to bleeding Avid brakes or performing a full service of a Reverb seat post.


The DTC building is imposing from the outside, but its massive size becomes even more apparent once you've entered the structure and passed through the showroom, popping out into the cafeteria (shown below). Examples of championship-winning bikes sit above each booth, casting a shadow as you eat your third helping of sauerbraten followed by one (or five) packages of Haribo gummy bears. A high-end espresso machine at the far end of the room serves as the water cooler rallying point for the SRAM engineers and other staff. A set of imposing doors, complete with a myriad of different warning signs on them, make it very clear that this is where the tour would end if you waltzed into the DTC building on your own accord. Our group has been given free reign of the facility, though, allowing us to pass by the display of vintage Sachs hubs beside the doorway and enter into a seldom seen world where the components that we use, and will use in the coming years, are dreamed up. It is probable
that the engineers we met would likely be toiling away on 2014 and 2015 products if they weren't in the midst of giving us a tour of the facility, but of course, those sorts of things were hidden from view before we even got close to those big doors.

SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.

Test Lab

In order to develop the XX1 drivetrain for production, SRAM first had to understand the forces put through the components in the real world. In this case, the real world involved both riders of average skill and pro-level athletes that would push far past the boundaries of even the most advanced weekend warrior. Early prototypes were taken out to the mountain and the bike was fitted with multiple data acquisition units, including a Quarq power meter. This allowed the engineers to keep track of gear choice, cadence, power, and many other real-world variables. These metrics were then used to not only develop more rigorous experiments, but were also fed into specially designed test rigs that allowed technicians to duplicate those very same conditions for an interminable amount of time, including to the point of failure, while under observation in the lab.

SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.

The DeMONSTRator

What looks to be some sort of high-tech exercise machine is actually a test rig, although we're betting that whoever saddles up on the 'DeMONSTRator' is in for a workout regardless. Again, data collected from actual riding can be imported into the machine, allowing the operator to simulate real-world conditions. If, for example, there was a need to replicate a specific scenario that needed to be played out again, but this time under the watchful eyes of SRAM engineers, it would be run on the DeMONSTRator.

SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.

Shifting in a Box

While its likely you've seen XX1 under SRAM's BlackBox riders by now, the components must also stand up to abuse from everyday, average shredders, day in and day out. With this in mind, SRAM needs to know how the system will react to countless hard shifts under heavy pedalling forces, which is why the rig above is equipped with a load cell that measures the forces involved in a simulated abusive riding environment. The test, which is run behind protective polycarbonate panels, allows technicians to focus in on the strain performance of the cassette, chain, and shifter.

SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.

Derailleur Evolution

The seeds for the XX1 rear derailleur were actually planted eight years earlier when engineers at the DTC facility were investigating the feasibility of a derailleur dedicated to pure DH use. The first prototype (above, left) was a 9spd unit that could be used with a standard range cassette; holding it in our hands it seemed to weigh as much as three or four production XX1 derailleurs. Remember, though, that weight is the last concern at this early stage of the development phase. This first prototype employed a 'straight parallelogram' that moved directly across the cassette, a concept that SRAM has christened 'X-Horizon' in reference to its horizontal plane of movement that differs from the angled, 'slant-parallelogram' design found on all modern derailleurs.

The slant parallelogram is necessary to keep the derailleur's upper guide pulley close to the cassette cogs while the pulley cage is busy trying to reel in and play out excess chain as the front changer is shifted between chain rings. It wasn't until years down the road that the Straight P concept was looked at again when SRAM began development of a single-ring drivetrain for all-around use. The second prototype (above, second from left ) was born a few years later, and is much slimmer in design and works across a 10spd cassette. This was also the first appearance of the large cable pulley wheel, a feature that would carry through all the way to the final production version (above, far right). Interestingly, it wasn't until the third prototype that the radically offset upper pulley was utilized - notice the upper pulley's position well behind the cage pivot - likely signaling SRAM's intentions to pair the derailleur with an immensely large cassette spread.

Given the DH origins of the XX1 rear derailleur, we have to wonder if SRAM has plans for a drivetrain, or at least a rear derailleur, devoted to pure downhill use. And yes, we mean a unit far more singleminded than the current X0 DH derailleur with its shorter P knuckle. SRAM had no comment on the matter at this point in time.

SRAM XX1 at their DTC facility in Schweinfurt Germany. Photo by Sebastian Schieck.

Steel Transformed

The XX1 cassette, with its massive 10 - 42 tooth spread, has been the talk of the new component group. And while we're used to seeing the impressive finished product, the cassette begins life in a much different form - a steel ingot (above, left) that roughly resembles the cassette's final profile. It arrives at SRAM's Taiwan manufacturing plant ready to be machined down close to its final shape (minus the teeth profiles), a process that takes place in a single, labour intensive step. While this is a serious operation that would be simpler to perform over a number of different stops along the way, this single-stage approach to the cassette's manufacturing means that the unit does not have to be transferred between machines, thereby ensuring perfect alignment over all points. A milling machine adds the tooth profiles, shifting features, and the pins that hold the large, 42 tooth cog in place. The XX1 cassette uses steel for ten of its eleven cogs, but the dinner plated-sized large cog is a separate aluminum unit that is held in place by way of pins machined into the backside of the largest steel cog. Forging is used to attain the large cog's basic shape, followed by a stamping process that forms the tooth profile, as well as the splining that will mate to the XD cassette body. All told, it takes well over three hours of production time to even begin to see the cassette's final form, with multiple hardening and finishing steps still needing to be performed. Despite the additional cog and large spread, the finished product weighs in at about 260 grams, making it one of the lightest cassettes on the market regardless of its size.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesOur visit to Schweinfurt also included three days of riding aboard an XX1-equipped Liteville 301, a bike that you'll soon be able to read about in a full-length review. The local trails were certainly smooth, fast, and full of flow, but the riding was still trumped by being let into the inner sanctums of SRAM's DTC facility. It is behind these usually-closed doors that an immense amount of product development takes place, with the end result usually adding up to some combination of lighter, faster, and stronger.- Mike Levy

www.sram.com
Photos by Sebastian Schieck
Must Read This Week

146 Comments

  • + 59
 I would consider murder just to have this group on my bike.
  • + 69
 Then you should be locked up
  • + 21
 Diagnosis: too much Spinal Tap
  • + 12
 marketing at it's finest
  • - 59
 I think that there is some serious tech behind those latest sex dolls, replicas pf porn actresses. True skin-like latex, warming system, voice control... I think more the potential buyers would be flooded with information more willing would they be to buy one. They may eventualy become complete nerds saying that they dont believe in benefits, the tech itself is cool. I still prefer a real woman than the most sophisticated wank...
  • + 67
 "Houston, we have a WTF?"
  • + 21
 But this one goes to 11.
  • - 27
 Houston, the sex doll analogy was meant to show that enough buzz will make you believe and lust after any crap, but at the same time this crap is still the same crap no matter how much emotional value you add to it and how much it costs. I admire SRAM for their marketing strategy with this one though,
  • + 3
 It's interesting to see what goes behind all this amazing tech that many of us take for granted! Good work SRAM. Smile
  • + 31
 SRAM : hey we have made a very innovative product .

Me: WOW what have you done ?

SRAM : given you an extra cog

Me : ..............
  • + 14
 Not trolling, I would much rather ride deore than this glorified crap
  • + 12
 Not that I think this (XX1) is absolutly required to ride your bike but without the top tier advancement the lower stuff would never be as good as it is. Deore is reliable and smooth now because of XTR developments 5 years ago. The technology moves down as new products are developed.
  • + 5
 I prefer more muscle in my legs…
  • + 0
 2:50 is soooooo trippy!
  • + 0
 More muscles in your legs? Are you retarded? Like full on. Gear inches, look it up.
  • + 5
 lol how much u wanna bet bonfire rides a triple
  • + 4
 Haha. If I am ever caught on a triple, you can personally come and beat me senseless. Good god. I wanted to implement a shop policy where if anyone had a triple, and came for servicing I had the right to remove your granny gear with a cutting torch.
  • + 2
 helibike, so todays Deore is as good as XTR from 5 years ago?

SRAM - If no BS is truly involved then give me a 10sp, 11x40 cassette in SLX/ X9 price range, let it weigh half a kilo, fk it! I can just pop it in on my current clutch derailleur equipped bike, without spending more than 100$ and get the every single benefit you talked about.
  • + 1
 I would agree current deore is similar to XTR from 5 years ago.
  • - 2
 5yrs ago: whether helibike said it intentionaly or not, coincidentaly 2002 - 2008 was the shittiest period both for XT and XTR (oh sorry current XT have reached the rock bottom, save the brakes and cassette). 960 XTR was crap as hell for the money, only merit can be given to first Hollowtech II crankset.

But @bolmaint - how about 950 series XTR from 10yrs ago? The current 980 and previous 970 XTR are the first Shimano grouppo to challenge 950 timeless masterpiece, other than that: nothing matches, nothing has been transferred to lower groups since 1998. Now SRAM? Call me when you beat 9sp X0 in terms of shifting performancem sharpness and reliability, there's some serious work to do on 10sp upshift crispiness and precision, so where are you going with 11 with that unfixed?
  • + 8
 Thanks, but no thanks. I'll stick to the good ol' 1x9 setup with $20 KMC chains, indestructible SS Surly chainrings and cheap XT cassettes on most of my bikes. That way I can also afford to keep spares of most parts. Save the money for bike trips instead.
  • + 10
 /\ /\ best comment !
real men only need 1x9.. Razz
  • + 1
 I agree with WAKIdesigns' comment about X0 9 speed, best mech i've ever ridden - period - with a double upfront and the PG990 cassette
  • + 0
 Jesus. Live under a rock then. Ride a rigid joe breezer.
  • - 3
 1.If you adress someone @bonfire, make sure you put @ as aprefix
2.Jesus has not given his opinion on this forum (yet), if I got his profile though I would have lots of off-topic questions, I am sure he beats Richard Cunningham's profile in number of Followers
3.I shall consider a career of an eremite proposed by you, maybe I will find Jesus in the solicity of my stone cave - any eremite forum you can recommend to ask for how to, where to tips?
  • + 3
 1x9 for me too! it is just cheap and does the job with 11x34

I am looking at a 10 speed 11x36 though ... Smile someday when prices are good

The idea is great but this is just too costly and not proven yet (relaibility)
  • + 2
 I thought of going to 10sp but found the next best thing and hella cheaper, just get a 12-36 9sp cassette. How often do we use the 11 cog, we always wish for something a bit bigger out back. All a 10spd is is the added 36 tooth cog (11-36), so save your cash and add the 12-36 at about $60 bucks and its done, and if your riding where you want the 11, then swap out the cassette to the 11-34.
Easy peasy.
  • - 3
 Whats the cassette manufacturer you talk about? Do they have 11-38 10sp?
  • + 1
 @bonfire: I'm just a simple cyclist who enjoys riding more than upgrading.
  • + 1
 @blitzback.. why not just change the smallest cog..? we all have spares around Smile
  • + 0
 @ WAKI, So technology advancements do not move the sport/equipment forward or you just arguing incorherantlly about miniscule tidbits of information that you think are the most important things to this sport. I realy dont care at all if you think that 5 year old XTR is crap. The point is that advancements today are appreciated in the sport later (yes, some fail). If companies stop looking for new developments to the equipment that advances mountain biking, we might as well "live under a rock" (Quote from bonfire).

Here is a caption for you.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hfYJsQAhl0

I wont be checking back because I dont give a flying fart what you think about my comment.

PS I ride a single speed and some 09 saint stuff.
  • + 0
 Sorry. its "incoherently". bad 2 finger typing.
  • - 1
 Dude, adult people solve insults either by fist fighting or sending PM - I think it would raise the quality of discussion here if mroe would do so. Insults don't improve that quality even if you use your long words, especially when you use them only to appear as smarter than really you are... don't crap by holding your ass higher than necessary

As to your vid: One educational hint here for future "debates" (so that someone can take something positive out of my post)

Don't shoot the big guns first... you never know if they are big enough, and you loose te ability to know your enemy - you become very vulnerable if the opponent is still standing - and well: I see it's the biggest of what you've got
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  • + 32
 I want a rear cassette, just to admire the machining.. It might take a couple days before I could put it on my bike and start hammering on it.. The group looks amazing.
  • + 2
 $408.36 on ChainReaction right now...good...lord....
  • + 5
 400 bucks for that fine piece of machinery is actually not bad if it were from an industrial point of view. Thats some serious machining
  • + 1
 No doubt at all. But how long will it last? I would never spend $400 on a fine piece of machining that's gonna fall apart in a couple of months...
  • + 3
 its for the spandex rockers.. who only have one bike.. or are rich as hell.. Dead Horse
  • + 1
 Why is it falling apart? It physically can't, it is a solid piece. You also don't need to buy new front chain rings, nor a front derailleur, nor a front shifter, nor fresh bales and hog that go along with it.
  • + 1
 It's one louder, It's not ten you see
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  • + 20
 As a drafting design engineer, seeing this stuff is like porn for us, and I will re-read this article over and over again! Good one, PB!
  • + 5
 Agreed it was definitely great to see the inner workings of the development of the product, but the video would have been a little more engaging had the advertising being shoved down our throats been a little more subtle. I'm certainly not usually one for complaining about the presence of new products or advertising, but this video was billed as a tour of the SRAM German Development and Training center, with reference to the new product, but SRAM we get it XX1 exists and its f*cking amazing. Would love to see some actual process as to how this product came in to being not just to be reminded of the end product, how much it's going to "revolutionise the sport" and how much I should buy it.

A little impartiality in journalism is important. Otherwise the content is worthless. RANT. I can only assume that the agreement with SRAM was that Pinkbike could get to show some factory guts if SRAM got their 90% advertising in the vid
  • + 1
 BTW that Lapierre Spicy is TEH SECKS. Just sayin'.
  • + 2
 Does anyone else get horned up thinking about Finite Element Analysis And Solidworks SimulationXpress?
  • + 1
 "FEA is the ONLY WAY!"
-Quoted from Materials & Processes 202 class professor!

Also, I'm an Inventor fan, personally, but I have used SW and it is really slick, especially with OEM and MEP addons like Amada's Lazerlink and Dr. ABE!
  • + 2
 @jackclark89 - There is no agreement regarding the video, but it was put together during our time at the DTC. If anything, I should have just titled the video differently. Good feedback, thanks.
  • + 3
 but if you think about it, most non-enginerd types and the 13yo's that troll this site would have been bored to death by the video had it shown machining and all the tech stuff. Since I would wager a majority of the users of this site have the attention span of beagle on coke I think the vid did a fairly decent job. Although, I too would have liked to see more of the processes but I fall into that enginerd/machinist category.
  • + 2
 @Mikelevy See I'm confused. You agree that the video was perhaps misnamed, but disagree that it was mostly just advertising? I just watched it back to make sure that we were watching the same video; you spend the first minute introducing the vid (fair enough) and only the last minute features any specific discussion or explanation of the actual inhouse testing. The remaining time in between is spent with the SRAM product manager, explaining the products and intentions of the new group, and with sponsered riders telling us when they got it and how great they think it is, as if their opinion is completely unbaised. How is this not advertising???!!!

If I were you I might feel like SRAM had somewhat taken advantage of your press coverage and your eagerness to see the inner workings of their development. But that's the thing, it's important to remember that as much as they help you by providing you with content for Pinkbike, you are helping them with their brand awareness by just showing up an letting them show you around.

Perhaps a better name for this segment might have been: "SRAM Marketing Excercise Disguised as DTC Facility Tour"

Your written article was really interesting and I look forward to further coverage and analysis of this product, but if I want to watch SRAM adverts I'll go on their website. Not Pinkbike.
  • + 2
 I don't understand this rant about advertising - you're being "invited" to see SRAM's inner core, that makes it a promotion from the outset! the tech is fantastic and the pics of the testing department were awesome, but i work for a massive world wide manufacturer, and when we invite guests to tour our facility - it's ADVERTISING

and i've got no bones with being made aware of the fact it's SRAM's FACILITY and this is their product range and how they did it, to be able to see the awesome techy bits.
  • + 0
 I also have no problem with the fact that it's SRAM's facility etc. but the point is that the advertising is already implicit. This could potenitally be a great opportunity for everyone: For SRAM because a real facility tour adds to their credibility and most importantly BRAND AWARENESS; for Mike Levy and Pinkbike because it creates engaging content and entices viewers who are interested in how bike compenents are developed and tested; and for the reader who will potentially learn something or just be entertained, whatever.

At the risk of repeating myself, instead we have a video, billed as part of a facility tour, nearly seven minutes long, five of which are entirely and explicitly devoted to the marketing ot a product, one of which is introduction and the other (less than) one for the intended use. The point is not that I hate advertising and product, but that Pinkbike, OR Victor Lucas, OR Mike Levy have let SRAM man handle a potenitally interesting piece of content, whittle it down to less than a minute and replace the rest with needless self promotion. It's completely unfair to the viewer and the website. As I said, however, the text was very well managed and interesting.
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  • + 13
 Pretty cool that the cassette is just one piece of machined steel!
  • + 1
 Yeah, it's incredible how the whole thing is 1 hollowed out piece but it still looks strong
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  • + 9
 Anyone else jealous that they have a pump track in their courtyard at their headquarters? Wish I had a pump track to play in on my breaks!
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  • + 7
 Very cool. Pictures are great. Workshop gave me the weirdest boner
On a related note, I still wish bigger companies would work on making gearboxes way awesome, instead of making improvements on the derailler, (but that is just me)
  • + 3
 I agree with you. Yes, they are reducing the weight of the whole system, but they're throwing it all at the back of the bike, compared to a gearbox which would bring it to the center of the bike, where it should be.
  • + 6
 the fella's job title was SRAM external drivetrain.... presumably there's an internal drivetrain department? or just superfluous german labelling just in case?
  • + 2
 If their R and D is any good, then they probably have a gearbox project on the works. If a company like sram came out with a really good gearbox, all it would take is a little bit of marketing and all the competition would get blown away.
  • + 3
 so you're saying there's a chance??
  • + 1
 I guess so, I mean it's a pretty obvious advantage over external drivetrain.
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  • + 6
 Nice, but my last XX cassette lost teeth faster than a junkie eating a caramel-covered apple. All this fancy machine work looks good on the showroom floor, but if they can't make a high-end product that stands up to the rigours of real mountain biking, I really don't see the point.
  • - 1
 Most of Sramanos engineering is focused of making the things go bonk right at the end of warranty ...and then they give you another cog to wear out... Our x-5, 7 and 9 rear derrailleur wear in less than a year now. Something is wrong... Now if the Mfgs could agree on a standard of how to mount a gearbox on a frame and then happily design away...truly inventive.
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  • + 8
 I am literally so envious of their shop. I do maintenance on my forking bedroom floor :'(
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  • + 5
 Two things...

#1 A pulley wheel to route the derailleur cable isn't actually a new idea, especially related to SRAM history as one of the "fixes" for poor gripshift shifting in the old days was to put an aftermarket pulley in place to route the cable and reduce cable friction instead of going through a large loop of housing.

#2 I really liked the placement of the bench vises on an arm that swings out from under the work bench. I'm going to have to see how to implement that one myself.
  • + 9
 bench vice porn
  • + 5
 Poorly worded on my part. Was in reference to the first time that the wheel showed up on the XX1 derailleur. Good point, though.
  • + 2
 I use this: thetoolswing.com

Would've loved seeing the cassette get milled.
  • + 1
 My vice holding a frame - www.pinkbike.com/photo/7085146

Come on everyone post pics of their vices !!
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  • + 2
 Not sure if i can ever afford this group, but it looks really nice. Although i think that you can get a working setup for nearly every terrain with a standard 1x10 setup.
The special freeuhub body will boost the costs u to a level that will make may wallet cry Smile
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  • + 2
 That cassette is a thing of beauty but still couldn't give a shit about having it. Most of us riders can't really afford to spend a grand on a gimmick when it really doesn't matter how many gears you are riding. Ignore the fashion crap and just ride your bike.
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  • + 5
 Can I just say that Mike Levy has one of the most bad a** jobs of all time!
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  • + 1
 The marketing strategies are hollowing your brains out!!!! MTB IS ABOUT YOU, THE BIKE AND THE MOUNTAIN! not you, your credit card and marketing you fools. People here arr getting kicked out of their houses and we are blindly guided towards these traps
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  • + 1
 wow! i love that WC XC Race is featured here... that 10T smallest cog is really intriguing and of course the biggest 42T too. I want to try it! hmmm... i wonder what Chainring would satisfy me, my location, and the steepest ascents nearby...
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  • + 1
 All amazing technology, but very expensive considering a compatible wheelset ON TOP OF the stupid expensive group. I'd take a 11-42 if it could fit standard freehubs. If 11 is too many, I'd love to see a more budget friendly 11-42 10sp. with a revised rear mech...... XTR-1? XT-1? Maybe even a 11-40 10sp 1x dedicated group?
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  • + 5
 That shop picture makes me want to cry when I walk into my garage....
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  • + 1
 This is weird. Why does a DH bike need a 42t low gear? I thought DH riders rode chairs or pickup trucks and sailed down steep grades.
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  • + 1
 I wonder if there any crash test see how much damage it could get, Just saying, I've test those gear, I do like the idea ! Would like try more of it !
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  • + 1
 Having all the back cogs one pice is cool, I would like to see them put the derialluere inside the cog!!! That would be sick.
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  • + 3
 This is all very pretty but I think i'll wait for a gearbox.
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  • + 3
 Cannot wait for it to trickle down to X0/X9 level.
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  • + 3
 Those german trails look soo fun to ride
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  • + 3
 egw pali protimw ta alla, ta kinezika.
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  • + 1
 SRAM has no comment on a dh intended rear mech ... yeah right .... they're probably working on a concept ... or who knows, perhaps even a prototype unit
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  • + 1
 very impressive! Especially the process of making rear derailleur. Our planet needs more bikes
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  • + 1
 I WANT THE FIRST VERSION OF THE DERAILER, LOOKS INDESTRUCTIBLE. UNLIKE MY SHIMANO DEORE CR@P.
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  • + 3
 7 minute abs!
  • + 2
 I prefer 6 minute abs. I mean who really has a full 7 minutes to spare these days.
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  • + 3
 Simply beautiful!!!!!
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  • + 1
 very impressive! Especially the process of making rear derailleur. Our planet needs more bikes
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  • + 1
 nice product but a little on the expensive side. but so is xtr and xx. looking forward to the Liteville review.
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  • + 1
 yeah its...... eh.......... gear changing stuff SRAM 101 on how to reinvent the wheel....or cog in this case lol
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  • + 1
 murder would be the least of your worries if i had the chance to get these guys on my bike
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  • + 1
 The next logical name for a SRAM groupset is XXX. I would definitely buy that.
  • + 2
 wouldn't that be 30 speed ?
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  • + 0
 amazing looking and working, then you look at the price, guess it will just have to stay amazing looking cause I've not really got £300 just for the cassette Frown
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  • - 2
 Meh. My 2x9 setup with 32T up front and 11/34T in the back has a broader range than this crap and is totally affordable. No advertising campaign necessary.
If SRAM would have gone 9/42T it would be pretty close with a 26T ring up front. Since we're abandoning the good ole' cassette carrier (WHY?) may as well go all the way; unless that's saved for 2014 to sell you another $450 cassette (WHAT?) and a new carrier (this is getting ridiculous).

I am no longer interested in keeping up with MTB "progress". I just hope 9sp replacement parts will keep around.
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  • + 1
 MIKELEVY, Is there any information on how the large 42t ring effects peddling bob?
  • + 3
 It comes down to how your bike interacts with whatever size ring you've spec'd up front. You can choose from 28, 30, 32, 34, and 36.
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 Do you need to use a different Rear hub or hub body to use this system?
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 sorry I meant freehub body
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 Yes, XX1 requires a proprietary stepped freehub body with external threading for the cassette to work. So far DT Swiss, SRAM, American Classic, and Industry 9 have produced compatible freehub bodies. Look for companies like E.13 and Easton to have compatible offerings later next year.
  • + 1
 Don't forget Hope
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 Correct. Hope is developing one as well.
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 F.. derailleur.. Gearbox please!!
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 no need for the chainguide? wow...
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 Not so fast. Jerome still uses a chain guide.
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 ...but the potential...
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 Did anyone notice how he said it was one piece than held up a single big ring
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 I'll buy it when shimano makes it, is the eleven speed chain narrower than a ten speed? If so wouldn't this just increase the chance of breaking chains?
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  • + 0
 ...the evolution of derailleur starts with something that Chuck Norris had for breakfast last time I spoke to him!
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 I'm confused by this image Frown
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 Holly SRAM! A Pure DH groupset with no need of a chain guide - that would be sick. That DeMONSTRator looks badash! Big Grin
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 i will wait for shimano to bring out 11 speed cos the price will be far more realistic
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 11 speed how thins the chain gonna be !!!!!
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 I'd like to mount the third prototype on my bike Big Grin
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 Turn the sound off and it's a good video.
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 all my respect for developers and engeneers here
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 I need a work bench like those and dig those bike stands with catch basin.
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 Love it, just can't afford it....
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 xtr shadow plus thooooooo
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 Can't wait till i can print out these cassettes with a 3D printer.
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 The old derailiers look so much stronger!
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 The cassette looks so cool before the teeth are machined into it Big Grin
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 designed in germany - so could we say that sram is a german company rather than american?
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 SRAM took over Sachs, at least the cycling branch, a couple of years ago.
Sachs had their own shifting components and where the inventors of Grip Shift.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZF_Sachs
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  • - 1
 Imagine a Hammerschmidt with these xx1....22gears in a neat package!! Smile

www.pintie.de/share/xx1a.JPG
  • - 2
 Or a triple with XX1. More like XX3 - 33 gears! Eek
  • + 1
 Read the story...different Sprokets is a no go Wink
  • - 2
 SRAM saying "no" wouldn't stop me from trying.
  • + 1
 well..if you want to wreck the cage, go ahead...smart move on a expensive group like this
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 Facepalm You need to take it down a notch. Don't be so serious.
  • + 0
 I didn´t start it Smile
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 time to start saving...
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 building those cassettes is such a waste of resources...
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