Tioga MT-ZERO Pedal Review

Nov 18, 2012 at 17:38
by Mike Levy  

Tioga MT-ZERO
Tioga's 7mm thick MT-ZERO pedals use a thin steel body and massive external bearing to offer unheard of ground clearance.

MT-ZERO pedal details:

- Intended for XC and AM use
- 7mm thick pedal body, 4mm at center
- Investment-cast chromoly platform
- ZEROaxle bearing and housing design
- Concave body
- Seven pins per side (five replaceable screws, two cast-on pins)
- Platform and ZEROaxle housing available separately
- Colours: black, white, silver
- Weight: 480g/PR (actual)
- MSRP: apprx $100 USD

The Details

Axle-Less Design
Tioga set out to design the thinnest platform pedals on the market, with the result being their 7mm thick MT-ZERO pedals. The usual limiting factor in platform thickness is, of course, bearing and axle size, and we've seen companies resort to smaller and smaller bearings, especially the outboard bearing, in an effort to bring down body height to previously unheard of low measurements. There are even models that have moved to an external bearing at the end of the axle, thereby avoiding being forced to squeeze it inside the platform. One of the major issues with this approach is that the smaller the bearing, the quicker it becomes rough and worn - a problem we've experienced with many of the micro, RC car-sized bearings employed on many current designs. Tioga's engineers took an entirely different approach by removing the axle and outboard bearing entirely and replacing them with a massive external bearing that sits up against the crank arm. This has allowed them to design an extremely thin pedal body that, at just 7mm at its thickest point (the leading and trailing edges), trumps all but the crank-specific Flypaper pedal.

Tioga MT-ZERO pedal

The wafer-thin body is contrasted by the large 'ZEROaxle' bearing housing up against the crank arm.


Steel Body
The MT-ZERO's body is so slim that there is no way it could be made from aluminum and stand up to any proper abuse, so Tioga manufactured the platform from investment-cast chromoly. This makes for a heavy-by-today's standards pedal that comes in at 480 grams per set, but remember that hitting a low weight target wasn't Tioga's goal with the MT-ZERO design. The steel body looks quite slender compared to what we're all used to seeing with an aluminum pedal, but it is key to note that it takes less steel than aluminum to create a strong package. The MT-ZERO body measures in at just 7mm thick, tapering down to 4mm at its center. Impressive. There is a chamfered leading edge, some machined pockets here and there that shed a few grams, and two cast-in pins on the outer edge on each side of the platform. Three countersunk screws on the leading edge and two on the trailing provide bite. The bodies can be purchased separately if required.

Tioga MT-ZERO pedal

Bearing Housing
The heart of the pedal is the 'ZEROaxle' bearing system that consists of a massive, over-sized bearing pressed into the grey housing. It is this housing that threads into the crank arm, with an M6 hex head screw running through the bearing and threaded into the pedal body. The attachment screw doesn't have to deal with much in the way of load carrying as a burly looking extension on the steel body fits directly into the bearing's inner race. The single large bearing is responsible for the job that would normally be done by at least two bearings (or bushings) on a standard pedal, but Tioga is confident that the design can stand up to some serious cross-country and all-mountain use. Interestingly, Tioga doesn't recommend the pedal for pure downhill or freeride-type riding, which is exactly the sort of use that most platform pedal users take part in. Yes, platforms are becoming more common as downhillers hang up their long-travel bikes for capable mid-travel rigs, but Tioga's warning still has us questioning just what market the MT-ZERO pedal is intended for. Having said that, we have to applaud Tioga for bringing the clever design to the market with an acceptable retail of around $100 USD in a world where boutique pedals routinely go for more than double the price.


Performance

Traction
We have to admit that, with a rather tame looking layout consisting of five flat-top screw and two cast-in pins per side, we weren't expecting the MT-ZERO pedal to offer much in the way of traction. That theory was quickly rejected once we hit the dirt - there is a surprising amount of bite on hand, with the pedals providing a very secure feel. No, they can't compete with the more aggressive pedals out there, but we have to say that the MT-ZERO is on par with most options on the market, even those that use grippier, open-top set screws for bite. How is that possible given the docile pin layout? There are a few different factors at play, but the biggest contributor has to be the thin profile that puts the sole of your feet nearly right on top of the axle center line. This extremely low foot position improves traction because the pedal body doesn't want to roll underfoot as much as a pedal with a taller profile would.

Tioga MT-ZERO pedal

Traction is impressive despite the slight concave and mild pin layout.




The easiest way to understand how and why it makes a difference is to use an exaggerated example, and one that Tioga themselves cite: imagine yourself using pedals with 6'' tall wooden blocks strapped to them, effectively increasing their body height more than six fold. That inflated height means your feet will want to rotate back and forth easier around the center line of the pedal axle, making for what would likely be a very unstable feeling. Tioga employs the exact opposite approach with the MT-ZERO, bringing your feet closer to the axle center line. Sure, it may only be by a few millimeters compared to other pedals, but we believe that it is enough to actually improve stability.


The body's built-in concave, going from 7mm at the leading and trailing edges to 4mm in the center, is another factor, although the 1.5mm of incurvate is the same as many other pedals on the market. Massive, open cutaways on the body likely also play a part, letting the sole of the shoe sink further into the pedal, thereby allowing the pins to work harder. All told, those three points create a pedal that certainly bites much more than we first guessed it would.

The platform size, at 92mm long x 96mm wide (at its widest point), is roughly the same size as some other options out there, although there isn't as much foot real estate available. This usually wouldn't be an issue, but the MT-ZERO's large outboard bearing takes up room that would otherwise be available for your shoes. The result is that you are left with your feet hanging off of the pedals' outer edge, even though the actual platform size isn't overly small. This, combined with the increased Q factor of the pedals, results in a wider overall pedal/foot profile compared to using a more traditional design. The outcome is less clearance in the width department, but we have to say that we found ourselves clipping pedals less rather than more. The added ground clearance certainly helps in this regard, but it comes at the cost of a slightly wider overall width.

Reliability
Many riders who saw us using the MT-ZERO pedal would point to the ultra-thin platform, shake their heads, and say, "Those are going to break." On the contrary, the bodies have proven to be very resilient - they are perfectly straight as we type this - but we'd expect that given their investment-cast chromoly steel construction. The large majority of platform pedals use steel pins that are threaded into a softer aluminum body, allowing them to be bent or ripped right out of the malleable aluminum in the event of a heavy impact. We dragged the MT-ZERO pedal over rocks with the disregard that comes only from using something you don't actually own, but the steel pin/steel body makeup brushed it all off without any hint of damage. The same goes for the two cast pins on the outer edge of each side of the pedal body - they don't wear down as you would normally expect to see aluminum molded pins do.

Tioga MT-ZERO

Bigger doesn't mean better - the ZEROaxle bearings didn't last long under us.


The bearings, on the other hand, didn't last more than a handful of rides before they became noticeably rougher. It was downhill from there, with the bearings becoming coarse enough that we could feel them through the soles of our shoes. A bit of maintenance was called for, hopefully accomplished by just lifting the bearing seal up and dripping in some light lube, but that was kiboshed by the non-removable bearing covers that are pressed in place. Yes, the covers do pop out if you really want them to (Tioga doesn't want you to do that, though), but the bearings use steel shields instead of the more common rubber shields, meaning it is a bit more involved to remove them when it comes time to drip in some lube. The bearing itself is 100% not removable, being machine pressed into the housing in a permanent manner. Instead, Tioga offers replacement housing assemblies consisting of the housing that threads into the crank arm, bearing and bearing cover, and attachment bolt. While this is a handy one-stop way to do things, we'd much rather have easier access to the bearing itself in order to give it some much needed love.

Tioga MT-ZERO

The MT-ZERO's remarkably thin steel bodies gave us zero trouble.


Issues
The MT-ZERO pedal is so slim and striking that pretty much everyone we rode with questioned us about them. Most were curious as to if the ultra thin platform could handle abuse, and if we suffered less pedal strikes while using them. The answer to both of those questions is a resounding yes, but the benefits come at a cost. The design's large external bearing forces your feet out into a very wide stance compared to what we are all used to, effectively making for a massive Q factor. The difference sounds small - about 13mm on the DMR V8 pedal versus 19mm for the MT-ZERO, but you also have to factor in the 15mm thick bearing housing on the Tioga pedal that prevents your feet from sitting inboard slightly on the platform. Those are big numbers when you are talking about bike ergonomics, especially when your feet have gotten used to a certain position after years and years of riding. The feel is akin to being forced to walk with your feet ten inches further apart than you usually would, despite the difference being measured in millimeters. In a word, awkward. We couldn't get used to the change of foot position, either, with it never feeling right to us. For this reason, Tioga admits the MT-ZERO pedal is not going to be everyone's cup of tea, and we'd have to agree with them.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesTioga has put a lot of time and effort into their axle-less design, and the result is certainly an impressive looking pedal. Barring the crank-specific Flypaper pedal, the MT-ZERO is likely the thinnest option on the market. We do question the very awkward ergonomics of the design, though, with us never being able to come to terms with the bow-legged position that the outboard bearing design forced us into. This, along with the fast wearing and non-serviceable bearings, has us questioning if the increased ground clearance is worth the trouble. If you are of the mind that you must have one of the thinnest pedals out there, or maybe you live and ride in an extremely rocky area, at least give them a spin around the parking lot to see if the wider stance works for you before throwing down your money. - Mike Levy


www.tiogausa.com
Must Read This Week









195 Comments

  • + 79
 Just a thought, but would it be possible to put the giant bearing on the opposite side of the crank arm and run the small axle part through the pedal threads so the pedal can sit closer to the crank arm? Anyone get what I'm saying or is it only me...?
  • + 103
 That wouldnt work purely because of crank-rear triangle clearance.... I think
  • + 23
 It would most likely run into the chaintays cos the clearence is like 1/2 inch usually
  • - 20
 also, wouldn't your ankle be hitting the crank arm if they were that close?
  • - 14
 I think that the bearing is going to rip your ankle up every time you hit the 6 o'clock position anyways. So either way I think it's really a lose/lose design...
  • + 52
 Im thinking for "crank-integrated" pedal bearing?
  • + 36
 Don't give them ideas, they might steal it from you.
  • - 10
 sarcasm> sure crank integrated. so new cranks too.. yeah the way forward.. .. sarcasm> i still bow to straitline and their bushing design.. although the axles do bend a bit easy..
  • - 10
 I am always stunned that some companies try to invent the wheel over and over again with some stuff which is good as it is...?? Where is actually the advance in that ???...and the weight, c´mon Rolleyes
  • + 4
 the flypaper pedals that were mentioned use a crank bearing design, but they were limited to one model of crankarm, as there arent many crank designs where the amount of space required for a bearing can be removed without making the crank arms significantly weaker..
  • + 18
 Is it me.... or is this "thin is in" craze just getting to be too much?
  • + 16
 yes. it might just be the camera angle, but that second picture looks BENT
  • - 7
 Will it bend if it hits my shins?
  • + 3
 You dumb... Fact, think about it
  • + 3
 EXACTLY.
I'm in the market for a pair of Syncros Meathooks. Know why? Don't run clips, good reliability, and they look good to boot.
Thin is not "in" in my garage.
  • + 7
 @nervous-hamster this was introduced in the early 80's! Tests made in those years showed also that this was a far more stifier design of pedal + crank than the regular one, but people wanted to stick with campagnolo so i didn't had much succes! hilarystone.com/images/sale%20images/Dura-Ace-AX-cset_pedals_small.jpg
  • + 3
 @NittyGritty: the bearing will never hit your ankle since it will always be next to the ball of your foot.
  • + 5
 @denverdh666 - They are perfectly straight, it is just the camera angle.
  • + 5
 @themountain- What's wrong with coming up with new ideas? What if people want to try something new and different? Don't be so ignorant... innovation is what makes every company unique.
  • - 14
 Bla-new ideas-bla...whats so special or new or better on that pedal ?? There is no ignorance in that when I say : A pedal is a pedal....nothing really to make better on it there, or am I wrong?? :?
  • + 7
 You're totally right. Same way a bike is a bike, right?
  • + 2
 Im really disappointed with my straight line pedals. The axle has so much resistance, they undo themselves. Even after loctite and a service..
  • + 1
 Go with SMAC Innovations pedals.
  • + 12
 I would start using safety wire before I would buy these pedals.
  • + 4
 PRESS FIT PEDAL BEARINGS for your crank-arms! Who'll win the race??
I can hear Shimano's 3D CAD machines booting up as we speak.......Or is that SRAM's?
  • + 7
 @themountain, Lets face it, you are wrong. If people didn't re-think old ideas to find ways to improve, you probably would't be riding the bike you are today. This is the same for Almost everything, people have come to learn that there is a better ways to make most things, they just havn't been thought of yet, pedals included. Good on tioga for having a go. They are the people ensure that they bike you buy tomorrow will be better and more functional in innovative ways than you previous one! Good on them, if this idea doesn't take off, move on and maybe you might strike one that does!
  • - 1
 looks like a shit design, the fact its from tioga probably means its a shit design.
  • - 1
 well thats a bit cruel.. but a single bearing will never hold the abuse and use a pedal encounters.. so tioga or not.. yeah shit design.. i think i am going to buy a chaincleaner now.. Whip
  • + 2
 www.ht-components.com/ht_portal/product/list?cname=pedal&cname2=dh%2Ffr%2F4x&productCname=EVO

been
Dh all year on these, awesome pedals with no issues whatsoever, and just as thin.
  • + 3
 why not put bushings in instead of bearings? solve your grinding issues id think
  • + 1
 Bearing in the crank arm maybe?
  • + 1
 i can only see that making the issue worse, more leverage for the axle to push the bearings and pit the races
  • + 1
 either way, pedals need some sort of support at either end of the axle...
[Reply]
  • + 8
 Spank's Spike pedals are better than these, they are lighter, more pins for grip, used them for a whole year and they still don't really need any maintenance. If Tioga manage to figure out that bearing issue these could be Awesome too!
  • + 3
 This. Spank just has a more refined design. All the benefits, just better.
  • + 3
 That's true, Spank makes a very nice and thin pedal
  • + 1
 A grease port a la old-school WTB Grease Guard technology would do the trick.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Looks as if its bent in the photo, may be the angle but it looks like it could happen with how thin it is?
  • + 2
 I noticed the same, and was wondering aswell if it's really bent or just the angle. Anyways, even though I love Tioga, I would never buy these pedals. Also 480g is nowhere near light IMO
  • + 6
 It is just the camera angle. They are perfectly straight.
  • + 1
 yeah they definitely look really easy to bend outwards, would not be surprised. could hardly call that an axle
[Reply]
  • + 7
 so its the thinnest to offer unheard of ground clearence? lets pretend the giant external bearing race does not exist and that where the crank usualy hits the ground, lets pretend the race wont hit the ground first..................hmmmm i see a flaw, i think its just a........ah bugger i have forgotten the word for products like these
  • + 14
 I don't always smash my crankarm... but when I do I mangle my bearings as well.
  • + 5
 Typically when I clip a pedal, my bike is at an angle. If you tilt a bike 20 degrees or whatever, the widest and lowest points (read: your pedals) are going to drop closer to the ground. All those measurements become exaggerated. I don't think the point is to give you a few millimeters more clearance when you're riding in a straight line down a paved road.
  • + 5
 Sure, that's true on descents but this is an XC/AM pedal. I bang my crankarms like a sybian when I'm climbing the technasty.
  • + 1
 Exactly, would only take a one or two careless pedals over a rock to smash those bearings to oblivion
  • + 4
 Crank and pedal strikes are two different things in my book, and I would say that I hit my pedals much more than the ends of my cranks arms. While we weren't overly impressed with the MT-ZERO pedal, the bearing housing is actually pretty beefy. Smashing it the point of causing vital damage wouldn't be a concern for myself, even if I lived somewhere rocky. That said, I didn't hit it hard so who knows.
  • + 2
 @erikthefatty what you are saying doesn't get said enough in the numerous thin-pedal discussions. When you introduce bike lean into the equation, pedal width may influence ground clearance as much as pedal thickness. You could show that on a single piece of paper with high-school trigonometry. But it doesn't make it into the marketing pitch... You could be giving back with width everything you gain with thinness, at a given angle.
  • + 1
 @Snfoilhat,

What you gain from making them thinner is the ability to make a pedal wider while having the same clearance at the same lean. That is what should be noted as an advantage over other pedals. Of course as the you lean further this advantage reduces so as a manufacture you would have to work out what the optimum lean to width dimension is.

As has been mentioned for an extra 2.5mm of height from the spank pedals I would take them any day of the week. The bearing is also smaller on the inner edge so means the end of the crank is still taking the hits rather than the bearing case. They also look better in my personal opinion.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 "We dragged the MT-ZERO pedal over rocks with the disregard that comes only from using something you don't actually own,"

As someone who has been able to use many high priced bike items and never pay for them: WORD. This is a true feeling, and it's really amazing.
  • + 2
 Where should I go to school to get a profession like that?
  • + 1
 larry: work at bike shops, go to school for engineering or marketing or something like that. iunno. i fell into it.
  • + 2
 Engineering, it will open your eyes to a whole other world
  • + 1
 Yep, thats the plan.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I am old enough to remember when people were down on carbon fiber frames, especially for downhill use. The haters that spoke out on brands like Lahar, Krutor etc.... But it was the pursuit of the "new idea" that led to the Wilsons and V-10s that we have now...The thin petal is going to lead to better bearings, axles, pins, and sizing that will improve stiffness, weight and feel ---- enjoy the pursuit of the next big thing, or go ride your steel bonded, threaded fork, thumbshifting, downtube shifting 10 speed schwinn to the bar and chill...Smile
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I see a potential for a new standard - a good one actualy! More and more manufacturers make those thin flat pedals (and for good reasons!) with large bearings on the inside - what if we make cranksets with doubled diameter for pedal mount to host that bearing? That would help with the elusive Q-Factor as well, isn't it? Big Grin


C'mon SRAM, gimme a XX12 crankset and XX12 pedals with such insert, and I promise to jump on current 11sp XX1 tomorrow! You can make XX12 12 speed and I buy two!

No matter what RC writes on clipless to scare flats back to the cave, the flat pedals still have lots of potential to develop and to shine as ever! Thanks to people like Five Ten, Point One, Tioga, Straitline, Spank, Spec, lately also Hope!, we move flat pedals out of their V8 dark ages! Keep on pushing those boundaries!

So far, those Tiogas are added on shopping list for my XC bike...
  • + 5
 dude serious ? after the bearing problems noted here.. ?
  • + 2
 At least on the which to choose list Smile I'd love to try something so thin!
  • + 1
 Flypaper still make ultra thin pedals that work, but they'll set you back about $600 and a set of FSA cranks. I don't really see what these have over Crampons and Pdiums, a couple of mm is worthless if they're not reliable (or safe).
  • + 1
 You could be onto something.The same way bottom brackets have been trying to move the bearings further and further outboard, could mount one either side of the crank arm. (obviously just standard ones instead of the huge ones here) to get better strength.

Though saying that, I'm 220 lbs and have yet to even service my DMR Vaults after about 8 months use. So existing tech can still work just fine.
  • + 2
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/2336473 read photo description - take note of date. Dean started this thing- everyone else is just ripping him off directly or was inspired to atttempt to create their own version by him
  • + 1
 Fair enough bnarlz!
  • + 1
 ah @bnarlz thats just what I was talking about. his come out the back of the crank too.. Interesting!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Those are just a joke !!!

"Tioga doesn't recommend the pedal for pure downhill or freeride-type riding"
"The bearings, on the other hand, didn't last more than a handful of rides before they became noticeably rougher."
"In a word, awkward. We couldn't get used to the change of foot position, either, with it never feeling right to us. For this reason, Tioga admits the MT-ZERO pedal is not going to be everyone's cup of tea, and we'd have to agree with them."
  • + 10
 I take it as a step on a way towards better pedals, no matter the outcome - I respect them for trying that out, putting the head out by releasing it into the public. I think it is the true innovation, way more than shaving 5g every year, changing colour scheme, making axles wider, suspension curves slightly more linear, tubing slightly thinner just the business as usual. A kind of pussy develoment is what I see from most of companies out there everything a tiny bit forward, just in case it breaks OR to make more money by constantly releasing new stuff for certain people wanting to be up to date... This is going balls out for it and I like it!

Tough yea, the bearings must be crap indeed, why complicate the servicing nr1, then dust shields instead of seals? on a bicycle? That's a joke indeed
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Love when pinkbike finally puts out a true product review. these pedals look stupid, there heavy, they wear out due to the amount of leverage applied on the bearing. they seem to be as shity as they look.
  • + 8
 Thanks for the props, but I always find it strange when only critical reviews are thought of as ''true''. There is a lot of great stuff out there.
  • + 1
 True Mike, but I've seen an absolutely terrible bike's inherent aspects ignored in a review (the review focused on the components of the bike) in the same magazine where that same bike had a double-page ad ($$$$$) right up the front. Honesty can hurt the hip-pocket, so negative reports are few and far between. I haven't seen this happen on PB, or not that I've noticed.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Canfield Crampons! Lighter, stronger, thinner, proven and in a plethora of colors! Oh yeah, rider owned company!
  • + 1
 Yep, I feel like my ultimates are thinner than these, even with the axle...
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Crampon Ultimates by Canfield Brother's may be expensive but they are absolutely the best pedal I have owned. 6mm at the leading edge, and 10mm in the middle, and fully servicable.
  • + 2
 Canfield Brothers Crampon Pedal are the best ..I run 165mm cranks on my DH and for some reason makes them not so short...
  • + 1
 Ya, still rockin' my Crampons!
  • + 4
 We have a set of Crampons on test as well.
  • + 1
 Are you going to test the new hope pedals? I'd be very interested to hear a good review on those!
  • + 2
 We don't have them right now, but the Hope pedals would be interesting. We'll look into it. Thanks for the suggestion.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 When Dean made the flypapers he was modifying cranks and were not available to bolt onto any stock crank. He came up with a solution for the problem but other circumstances ended his progression for this product. I know someone that has prototypes that have been rolling around for 5 years with no problems...
  • + 1
 now you know two- and i know of 4 more pairs still rolling.
.www.pinkbike.com/photo/2336473
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Thinner is the way forward but the bearings are always gonna give trouble, these Tiogas are only 1mm thinner than my Canfield Crampon classics.
I bought the Crampons to get more clearance after the V8's I was running on my xc bike nearly sent me off more than once, I have put in about 2000k with the crampons and finally the drive side bearings disintegrated half way around the Llandegla black - replaced the bearings (£4 each form a local supplier) and drilled and tapped them with 12 extra pins per pedal, they've been to the Alps twice on a Blur and now live on an Uzzi I use for DH - amazing grip now i've sorted the convex issue with extra pins and apart from replacing the bearings every year or so - are pretty much indestructible, an expensive pedal when new and with problems - but can be killer :-)
  • + 2
 If thin is the way forward, then I better buy a bunch of my DXs now... I can't stand this trend... the THINNEST I ever want to see a pedal is right about where the Straitline SCs are, and that's it folks.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This might sound crazy, and I am the first to complain about "new standards" but can it be that hard to add some kind of standardized bearing mount to a crank instead of a pedal thread then surely this type of design is much more feasible and practical for all.
Dibs on the ip if anyone creates it Smile
  • + 1
 Turns out I may be too late with this idea. Should have read all the posts first Frown
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Great that someone is thinking outside of the box but I really do hate looking at these pedals.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 using a single row ball bearing for an application like this is usually not a good idea. the side loads trash the bearings quick. There are double row ball bearings, but those are wider ... and above these are double row angular contact bearings .... these bearings are also a bit wider, but resist side loads better ... tioga should perhaps look into this? Smile )

www.dhkbearings.com/photo/original_6498711cc197e2f2f879c058633d4305/double-row-angular-contact-ball-bearings-3917b.jpg
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Canfield Bros pedals. FTW. I have a pair of the classic and a pair of the ultimates and are by far the nicest pedals I have owned. and only 10 mm thick on the ultimates.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice pedal V.0.7112 Beta...

The bearing needs to go into the crank with full radial seat. The bearing needs to be a tapered roller thrust type. Most likely two to give full complement of radial and axial forces. They probably need to be way oversized. Clumsy look..

Sounds expensive and fitting and maintenance might be a nightmare. So slightly better than Tioga pedal but not by much.

Cheaper and better: Large plain bearing, crank is machined to take a replaceable journal, keyed - so non rotating. That would take the logic into the crank and there is enough meat on the crank for a lubrication nipple for a grease gun. So there is no axle limiting height of the pedal. Could be paperthin and made of superstrong and ultralightweight unobtainum.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The Q factor issue should not be taken lightly...

I had to replace my bottom bracket on my now second/ old bike. It was an old Isis and needed to be replaced/ upgraded with a external bearing bottom bracket .

The bike never rode the same after that. My legs would tire out very easily and muscles would be sore that never were before.

That was at least half the reason I bought a new bike. Te other half was that it needed new suspension , front and rear if it was going to b ridden on a regular basis.

The bike has since been converted to flats / the buddy bike.
  • + 1
 P.s. to keep it safe, I did rebuild the front and rear suspenison .
  • + 1
 Thats weird, I was looking at an old ISIS of mine and replaced it with an ex BB crank . The crank arms were much less curved leaving the same crank to chain stay gap even though the bearings were external. It didnt seem to affect the width of my pedal stance at all. But I didnt actually make an accurate measurement.

Maybe you are just getting old. Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 These will be amazing! I cant believe there could be much negativity towards them i'm going to pop them on my xc bike as soon as they come out. I can see the logic with thinner pedals and i really would not worry about them snapping. Anyone with half a brain will be able to see there thick enough to hold the weight of a rider, ok maybe not a hucker, but in that respect you not going to catch me riding xc with a pair of monster T's on my epic!! Just coz you can buy them it might not mean there aimed at your style of riding. Im all for them !!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I just looked at these at my LBS and they definitely are very impressive! They are super thin and look awesome, i just kinda held them up to my shoe and they felt grippy enough, but I wasn't able to actually try them out on a bike so I don't know if the huge bearing housing does in fact get in the way or not. I'm very tempted to buy them, but the unknown factor of reliability and longevity is leading me towards a more well known and well used pedal like a spank spike or wah wah style.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Sometimes it's really not worth doing something different for the sake of doing something different.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I will be harsh and say I do not like it at all. You are just looking for new products to sell for 2013. That bearing makes the slim peddle null in terms of weight and ease. DX style pedals should, and will always, rule for flats. These get 4 goons out of 4.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 the lateral forces on that bearing case are going to be inordinately high, unless the rider weighs about the same as a squirrel and the small screw holding the platform is going to wear. ultimately resulting in it falling off, if it's not already bent by repetative shock. a total waste of $100.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have blackspires sub 4. When I remove the pedals from the bike I notice the axle is slighlty bent on both of them. If axles can be bent I think these will brake at some point as there is no axle all the way through the pedal body! I do not trust them, sorry! Just my opinion.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wow if they put a standard ball bearing in tge instead of an angular contact then I'm doing one big engineering fail related face palm right now! It will explain why the bearing died so quickly though if they did, as with all that leverage on the bearing it will have just as much side thrust as downward thrust....
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I would bet my money the guy that designed that doesn't ride or at most is a once-a-month-XC.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Its a nice concept but the lack of center axle is scary looking. Basically the entire load resting on that one threaded bolt end. Nice being flat but not sure if I would consider that design for any amount of money.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 480g? that's almost 200g more than my mg1s. not even in the right weight ballpark. if these could lose even 125g i think they'd be a viable option.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 That's pretty brave putting all that effort in designing a flat pedal that is purely for XC and AM when the majority of XC and AM riders ride clipped in.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hey everyone! Just wanted to let you know we just got a HUGE batch of CRAMPON ULTIMATES! Just about every color you can think of too! Happy Thanks-day to all! Hope everyone gets to HUCK something!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Shame the bearings are rubbish looks pretty good idea with no axle to bent and no bushing to crap itself.
Anyway am done with high end(expensive) pedals after both axle bent on my last pair(dmr vaults) after 3 months.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 looks like they should of done some real market research and sked riders if they liked the look of them before spending lots of money making them
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I can see that bearing chewing up the bone on the inside of your ankle if you're not careful... ouch!
  • + 2
 Good point! They could have rounded that shit off from ankle side, and place 7 or 8mm allen in the axle.
  • + 4
 It looks like it's about the same thickness as the sole on your shoe. It's not going to hit your ankle. Forgive me if I'm wrong, but I don't think there's any point in the crank rotation where the spot near the arch of your foot magically jumps 2 or 3 inches to your ankle.
  • + 1
 Good point, I overlooked that aspect of it. Well I withdraw my accusations...
  • + 1
 Even the guy in the diagram has a bruised/bleeding ankle!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Bent! - Check.....bashed/bruised ankle bones - Check..... No thanks Tioga, they seem about as good as your old tyres. I'll stick to the choice of a myriad of other more appealing pedal designs. Just personal opinion mind!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 !

I notice that those pedals are developing a downward sag at the ends. Is that the axle bending, the body bending on the bearings giving up the ghost?
Also, have you guys seen/heard of any axle failures yet?
  • + 3
 There is no "downward sag at the ends" otherwise we would have mentioned it in the review. The bodies are straight.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Pedal smack anyone?
That bearing case would be toast after one ride around the rock garden.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 these aint for me. just seen shimano saint platforms today there going on my bike.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 These look good, but more like a prototype, next years model, with a few improvements to the bearings etc and they will be on my bike for sure!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 not sure about a non fr/dh flat pedal, it probably can't be used for dirt jumping either and most xc/am riders are on clipless
  • + 8
 Yea most people are on clipless... good for them! (I guess) I like that someone thinks about those strange people like me who ride XC/AM on flats
  • + 2
 Flats for XC/AM too here! Smile although at the moment I ride some old MG1s.
  • + 1
 ^ I love MG1s, good shout
  • + 1
 I got a good feeling most people will ignore the "not for fr/dh" thing anyways, the riding people can do on their am bikes is almost the same as on a dh bike anyways
  • + 3
 Don't worry, a new breed of a badasses on two wheels is growing:

The dinner party was in full swing when Henry Ratchett said to the young man: oh mountain biking, you say, very interesting, my dear friend's son likes it a lot! He does some huge jumps and insane, I mean insane speeds, in the mountains where they have those specially built tracks! They use lifts to get up there, so high it is. It is remarkable - here he paused looking over the table at the coil at the decolt of Madam Bouazier
- very dangerous apparently! - he continued, that's why they wear this, this armor and helmets covering face! And the prices of those bicycles - he looked up - Dear God! - he gasped. So are you doing any downhill as well?

The young man's eyes frozen on the glass of wine and he said with the voice full of contempt for people who use bicycles with too much travel to cover for their lack of skill: No! I am an ENDURO rider!!!
  • + 1
 Where the heck did this quote come from? Did you write this just for the sake of a comment?
  • + 2
 Yea, I got carried away a bit...
  • + 1
 Its from that British costume series from WW I - The Downhill Abbey
  • + 1
 Holy shit WAKI l, two days in a row you inspire me and make me laugh. I may have to follow you now to not miss out on any of your inspired comments! Salute
  • + 3
 Oh man, you are more than welcome, I wish there was at least one woman that ever told me such thing - I've wasted my life...
  • + 2
 haha I feel ya.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Don't like them Wouldn't trust them
[Reply]
  • + 3
 NRG Taster's Choice. Best bang for the money.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 still got the same tioga finish on them, such a bad look. i could get a better finish if i sprayed up sand paper
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Enough is enough!!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 you see that 'DO NOT REMOVE' warning? yup, I would remove...where's me screwdriver...?
  • + 2
 It actually means "DONT LOOK AT THE LO GRADE BEARINGS"
  • + 1
 dont worry im sure their will be some super expensive ceramic ones you will be able to buy soon lol
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Wow, that really sucks Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This shit is getting stupid.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Crank specific pedal? Hey tioga, step off my nuts.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I don't have anything nice to say, so I am saying nothing at all. Smile
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Bearings pressed into the crank arm would be the next evolution. Sick
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I think the pedal bearing must be attached inside the crank, but that will be a complete new combo concept.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 All that for a pedal that is just a few mm thinner than other tried and tested models.....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Haha... I saw the thumbnail on the home page and thought it was a snapped pedal.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 While I am a die hard "love to be locked to my pedals" kind of rider....these are a really great looking design and look to offer durability and modularity. Nice job guys !!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i like how the review for the thinnest pedals has the thinnest link on the homepage
[Reply]
  • + 1
 once i was brake a rock on 3 parts when cresh pedal in rock. my luck pedal was strong and my foot was not injured.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 They would be like lifting weights to heavy. Nuke proof Electrons!
  • + 3
 Yeah, i wonder if they could make a carbon body or something? More $ obviously but if they used recycled carbon it would be cheaper and should still be strong enough Smile

P.S nukeproof electrons are lovely pedals Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Investment cast... really?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Not going so sell... neg prop me in 2 years time if I'm wrong !!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 what aload of old horseshit
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I can't spell Pedal....whoops
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How thin is too thin? This is the answer.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I feel like that would hurt my foot if I landed hard.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Has everyone just looked past the point for am and xc you are clipped in! you cannot ride xc competitively if you are running flats
  • + 5
 Not everyone is, especially here in B.C.
  • + 7
 @jak9ell, You are Wrong.
I race XC and always ride flat pedals, I've won races with everyone else riding clipless and me on flats.
Flat pedals teach you proper technique, pedaling stroke and efficiency, if you can bunnyhop over rocks and logs on flats you're better off than all the people riding clipped in who can't. Through rock gardens and such, having flats teaches you to keep your feet on the pedals without bouncing around, something that the masses rely on clipless do to for them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I count more dislikes to likes! shame really!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 xc? without clip? i dont get it........
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Clipped in all the way!!! These are nice looking pedals though Razz
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Looks cool...that's all that matters....isn't it..?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 хуйня же
[Reply]
  • + 1
 looks not solid
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Kill it, with fire!!!
[Reply]
  • - 3
 Indented use XC?
  • + 3
 Intended?... xc AND am
  • - 13
 if you're still using flats for XC/AM, you're doing it wrong. I don't care what anyone says, clips are better, fact.
  • + 7
 one footed drifts or die
  • - 3
 why buy that if in xc and am you have clip pedals? now that would be sick for freeride... but it wouldnt hang it i think...
  • - 13
 whoever neg propped me is fully (should be hospitalised) retarded.
  • - 2
 also, one footed drifts are just as easy clipped in, you just need to learn not to ride like a moron.
  • + 3
 I ride Flats Frown
  • + 1
 haha, just trollin' Wink

i like you because you sell me anglesets on the cheap
  • + 1
 What can I say! I'm a nice guy Smile I'll hopefully be coming to stay with you guys one night next year to go riding!
  • + 2
 lol, you'll probably not get much riding done if you're in bangor!
  • + 1
 Heard the drinkings ok Smile
[Reply]
  • - 2
 Sorry, but the finish on those platforms looks nasty. And they're bent.
  • + 5
 They are not bent. If they were bent, you would of read about it.
  • + 1
 Even so Mike, would you fit this shite to your 3 Grand bike ?..... Think I know the answer already, don't come back to me on that one !!
[Reply]
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2014. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv15 0.060036
Mobile Version of Website