e*13 LG1+ pedal Review

Oct 17, 2012 at 20:19
by Mike Levy  

e.13 LG1 pedals
The novel LG1+ pedal employs a plastic and aluminum body, custom pins, and a 'Spin Control' feature that lets riders set their rotation resistance.

e*13 LG1+ pedal details:

- Interchangeable 'Impact Flexure Design' deck plates
- Webbed aluminum body
- Body spins on two IGUS bushings
- Adjustable rotation resistance via 'Spin Control' dial
- Custom pins in 1, 4, and 7mm lengths (included)
- Heat treated CroMoly spindle
- Colours: black/gold or white/gold
- Weight: 468g/PR (claimed), 482g/PR (actual)
- MSRP: $129 USD

The Details

Dual-material pedal body
The body of the LG1+ pedal utilizes a clever dual-material construction, with replaceable plastic deck plates that conceal a webbed aluminum skeleton. A separate plastic plate is used on each side of the pedal, with e*13 claiming that they offer a slight amount of deformation upon impact, a layout that they refer to as 'Impact Flexure Design'. The idea is to allow the plastic section to absorb any impacts rather than the metal pedal body, possibly preventing fatal damage to the pedal that would occur otherwise. Interestingly, the exact same material is used to manufacture the bolt-on taco chain guards on e*13's chain guides. The IFD deck plates have been molded to fit quite snugly over the pedal body, tight enough that we can't see any debris being able to get underneath, and each plate it held in place by the thread-in pedal pins. Besides protecting the pedal's metal body, the deck plates also give the LG1+ pedal its shape, with leading and trailing edges that measure 21mm thick, an 18mm height directly over the axle, and 15mm in the central webbed sections of the body.

e.13 LG1 pedals
The form-fitting IFD deck plates protect the pedal's webbed aluminum body.

Bushings, not bearings
In contrast to the common arrangement of a sealed bearing and bushing combination found within many pedals, the LG1+ uses two IGUS bushings to allow the body to rotate on the axle. A somewhat standard bushing is found at the inboard end of the body, but a concave-shaped bushing is used at the outboard end. The shape of the bushing matches the profile of the steel cone that acts as the inner race, allowing e*13 to adjust the pedal's ease of rotation via their 'Spin Control' system. The IGUS bushings are self-lubricating, meaning that they are designed to run clean and dry. The seals, however, will benefit from a touch of light teflon-based lube every now and then.

e.13 LG1 pedals
e*13's Spin Control exposed. From left: the steel cone that runs on the concave IGUS bushing, a thin washer, gold anodized adjustment dial, the locking T20 torx screw.

Spin Control
e*13 allows LG1+ pedal owners to adjust the level of rotation resistance via a clever dial on the outboard end of the axle. The Spin Control system employs a steel cone that runs on a concave IGUS bushing that matches its profile. When not locked into place, the cone can be moved in and out on the axle in order to provide more or less friction between it and the IGUS bushing, and it features a square inner profile that matches the shape of the axle end, thereby keeping it from rotating. The cone's postion is determined by where the gold coloured aluminum adjustment dial is set - thread the dial in on the axle threads and it pushes the cone up against the bushing with more force, but back it off and the pedal will be able to spin easier. A thin washer between the cone and itself helps it to turn easier, and a dual-lip seal on its inboard end works to keep out dirt and moisture. Everything is locked into place with the T20 torx screw that threads into the axle end and butts up against the gold adjustment dial. The screw locks the adjustment into place after you've set the desired amount of free spin that you're looking for. Both the gold adjustment dial and the locking T20 torx screw are tucked away within the pedal body cage, making the possibility of a rock strike very slim.

e.13 LG1 pedals
A lot of thought has gone into the custom pins used on the LG1+ pedal.

Custom pins
Whereas many platform pedals use off-the-shelf components like grub screws or standard hex head screws, the LG1+ pedal employs custom designed pins to provide traction. The pins use a relatively course thread on a wide base that should prove to be much sturdier than a smaller diameter section, and they then flare out to a wider stepped shoulder that looks to offer even more support where it interfaces with the plastic IFD deck plate. Externally, a large circumference lip tapers down to the biting tip of the pin, which is enhanced with multiple edges machined into the end of each one. A 2.5mm hex key is used to install or remove each pin from the front side of the platform, with tool access coming from underneath to prevent damage from pedal strikes and allow you to remove a bent pin easily. The pedal comes with both 4mm and 7mm pins, as well as 1mm tall blanking plugs that can be used to tune the feel of the pedal underfoot.



Performance

Traction
While other elements certainly do come into play, out and out traction is the defining feature of any well-designed platform pedal. But the amount of traction between the pedal and your shoe is a factor of multiple details, not just how large and pointy the pins are. Pedal body size and shape (platform area and amount of concave), body thickness (a thicker body will tend to want to 'roll' underfoot), as well as both the amount of pins employed and their placement all come together to determine if your feet feel glued in place or if they'll shift at the first sign of rough terrain. There are many pedals out there that are thinner, and there are others with more concave and more pins, but e*13 has managed to trump every other design on the market when it comes to traction - the LG1+ pedals simply have no peer when talking about grip. And this was in completely stock form, with the standard 4mm pins fitted. Replacing the central pins with the 1mm tall blanking plugs in order to add a degree of artificial concave produced a positive feel that no other pedal we've used can boast about. Jumping up to the toothy-looking 7mm pins on the leading and trailing edges multiplied that effect to the point where we would say that it might be overboard for all but the most aggressive riders. We wouldn't recommend this setup for those who are learning to ride with platforms because, although the grip is truly mind blowing, the consequences of a slipped pedal will be horrendous.

e.13 LG1 pedals
Battered but far from beaten. The plastic IFD deck plates have proven to be very resilient, showing only cosmetic damage after our time on them.

The amount of adhesion that the LG1+ pedal provides certainly adds a degree of confidence on the trail, especially of you are coming off of more run-of-the-mill platforms. We actually can't recall accidentally un-weighting the pedals while in the air or coming off of a lip awkwardly, and the insane traction gave us confidence even when our feet weren't placed in the ideal position, a big plus when rolling towards a tricky move without the time to reposition a badly placed foot. As you might expect, the bonkers traction that we're raving about does have a downside, though, with it certainly requiring a bit more effort to adjust your foot postion. It takes a conscious effort to make a change, and we sometimes found ourselves actually waiting until we were in the air to move our feet slightly. Can a pedal have too much grip? We think so, but the LG1+'s pin size and placement options let you decide how much you require.

The LG1+ pedal offers a massive amount of real estate for your feet, with a platform size that measures 110mm front-to-back and 100mm wide. That's more surface area than most other options out there, and we found that it resulted is less foot-overhang and therefore more support. This fact might not rate highly for those with average to small sized feet, but larger riders are sure to appreciate the added support that comes from the vast platform size. Riders who suffer from hotspots on the soles of their feet should take note.

e.13 LG1 pedals
You want traction? The LG1+ pedal is your best bet.


Reliability
At 21mm tall at the leading and trailing edges, the LG1+ pedal could be considered thick by today's ultra-slim standards. Despite this, we can't complain about more pedal strikes than usual, although this will be a function of your local terrain and the bike that they are fitted to. They did well to brush off the impact of hitting the ground when they did make contact, though, with the plastic IFD deck plates taking some solid hits without any fatal damage. The custom steel pins that e*13 has employed have held up very well. Yes, a few have had their tips ground down, especially those on the outer flanking edges, but most still have a very effective biting tip to them. We are also admittedly surprised to not have bent or knocked any of them out of the pedal body, likely an attribute of their large shoulder that provides plenty of support. Swapping pins couldn't be easier thanks to the protected reverse-tool access that ensures that you shouldn't ever have to resort to vice grips.

Spin Control
Compared to using a simple grub screw that is threaded in or out to provide more or less friction, e*13's Spin Control feature is unquestionably a more refined way to adjust spin resistance. Is it worth the extra complication? e*13's Chris Costello thinks so, saying that grub screws "are a necessary evil sometimes but are prone to getting clogged, stripped out, and end up stuck in place, particularly in places that see a lot of dirty, wet abuse". We have to agree, with those sentiments being especially true when talking about use on a platform pedal. The Spin Control system, on the other hand, is simple to use even after slamming the pedals into rocks and roots during a Summer of abuse. The tension is adjusted by using a T20 torx to back off the locking screw, and then turning the gold dial either in for more spin resistance, or out for less. Once you have it set where you want, snug the torx screw back up and you are set. In the real world we found that the gold tension adjustment dial can be quite hard to turn with your fingers (a small box wrench helps), and that we couldn't get the LG1+ pedals to spin as free as we would have liked them to. This is partly down to the use of IGUS bushings instead of bearings (although the Spin Control system requires the bushings to function), but also due to the type of seals that e*13 has used to keep Mother Nature out.

While the system is simple to use, we do have to admit that we suffered a technical issue that was 100% caused by us and not a fault with the Spin Control design. While trying to get the pedals to spin with less resistance, we inadvertently rode them with the adjustment dial and locking screw back out too far. The steel cone that would normally be running on the concave IGUS bushing was then sitting out slightly too far on the axle end, causing a small burr to form on the axle that kept us from being able to adjust its postion. Again, this was an issue caused by us and one that we fixed with a file in only a few minutes, but LG1+ pedal owners should take a second to check for too little tension by trying to rock the pedal body on the axle - if it shifts, you need to tighten up the Spin Control dial and lock it in place.


Issues
Our single complaint with the LG1+ pedals boils down to the amount of spin resistance they have, even when the Spin Control system is completely backed off. As mentioned above, this can be a positive attribute when using the pedals in a true downhill setting, allowing for consistent pedal positon when dabbing for a corner. But the downside is increased friction when pedalling. This bone of contention keeps us from recommending them for us on an all-mountain bike given that a pedal that doesn't turn free is akin to a wheel that doesn't turn free, neither being issues that we'd want to be dealing with when facing a long climb. That is a bit of a shame considering how much traction they offer - we would love to run these pedals on all of our platform-equipped bikes; they are that good. It looks like e*13 agrees with that sentiment because they are releasing an updated seal kit that they say will greatly reduce friction, thereby opening up the adjustment window of the Spin Control system. Upcoming production versions will be fitted with the new seals, and earlier models can be retro-fitted as well.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesFor pure downhill use, which is exactly what they were designed for, the LG1+ pedal is the best that we've ever used. They offer an impressive amount of traction and stability that most other pedals can only dream of, and e*13's custom pins not only prove a ton of bite, but are also very stout. They aren't the thinnest, nor are they the lightest, but the LG1+ pedals are our first choice for use on a DH bike. - Mike Levy


www.e13components.com
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104 Comments

  • + 234
 when will they make rubber pedals and spiked shoes to save my shins?
  • + 52
 If you make those, I will buy them.
  • - 16
 I have all ways wanted them do this, how had would it be lots of other sports have studied shoes
  • + 20
 Or just wear shin pads?
  • + 18
 Imagine, 5.10 pedals, with Stealth compound on an aluminium basis, with spiked shoes ... saves your shins, traction when climbing back up (especially on super slick roots) the hill, and shouldn't be much heavier than a regular pedal/shoe combo ... and I'd say the same grip as a regular 5.10/pedal

Someone has to set up a prototype for testing ... ^^
  • + 50
 The shoes would be un-walkable on any rocks or hard surfaces, not to mention damage the flooring. You'd also likely see issues with the rubber coating on the pedals being torn off when they scrape the ground.
  • - 32
 Fair enough un-walkable when walking out your house but if you decide to get off you bike halfway down a track because your a 'pussy' you deserve to speak to the floor haha
  • + 29
 nice one, how about when you need to walk back up to do another run.
  • - 3
 Excellent idea. Ribbed rubber and short studs on shoes. Will work.
  • - 27
 been done it's called clipless you phuqtards.
  • - 27
 Just learn how to ride. I ditched the shin pads 3 years ago and have yet to slip a pedal. I wouldn't be caught dead in shin pads anymore. I would destroy rubber pedals on rocks fairly quickly.
  • - 10
 hahaha Teton Larry for the win! I agree, practice! If your slipping pedals, your pedals or shoes are the problem....maybe both!
  • + 1
 Or maybe pussy rockgarden. Here we have rock gardens that can make an anti shim pad think twiice. Rubber in the pedals could suit some people, its uP to them, not to you
  • - 7
 Nah, I just air over every rock garden so that's not an issue for me. Demand must be so high for rubber pedals considering no companies make them.
  • + 8
 Larry accidents can happen whether you are wearing shin guards or not. Has nothing to do with the type of rider you are.
  • + 6
 Rubber pedals don't exist because that is a stupid idea. Just think about it.
  • - 9
 Just because accident's happen doesn't mean I'm going to rock a full pressure suit, armored gloves, shin pads, etc. All this protection is a false sense of security, and I find I ride better and fall less wearing less protection. Helmet, knee pads, and sometimes elbow guards is the most I will consider. I used to hit my shins when I wore shin pads. Now subconsciously I know that will hurt, so it never happens. I bought a pair of elbow pads in Whistler and fell on my elbows 2 hours later. Prior to that I hadn't fallen at all in 3 months. The subconscious is a powerful beast.
  • + 13
 I'm not wearing shin pads except if I'm riding in super rocky tracks, and I haven't slipped a pedal in a year. 5.10 shoes with basically any pedal will grip.

And I don't see why a pedal made of an aluminium/mg core, with a thin layer of rubber would be wrecked on rocks ...

As for why nobody has done it before, I'd be ready to bet my bike it has been tried before, tested, and they probably concluded it wasn't good enough to be on production. Yet I'd like to test it.

And it's a completely different system than clipless, you "phuqtard".
  • + 8
 Mike, my tires are made of rubber and they don't fall apart (too much) when they contact the ground. I say bring on he rubber pedals.
  • + 7
 Sweet cant wait until golf shoes are the new thing!
  • + 1
 @mxlemming comletely agree, my tyres manage to go over rocks without being torn to shreds! Sounds like a novel idea that 5 ten could do as an advertising project. Get a track runner on a dh bike Razz usain bolt doing downhill!?
  • + 2
 About the shin pads, you don't really need to crash or slip a pedal to appreciate them, I've had a BIG, sharp rock fly from my front wheel straight to my shin more than once at a high speed, or even a rock from my rear wheel hit a friend's shin while he was following me, and he didn't have pads..it did hurt quite a bit apparently.
  • + 1
 To start, your tires don't rip because they're filled with air, so they contort, whereas a rubber would rip off an aluminium body. Also you get grip from the pins sinking into the rubber, not the friction between rubber and pins (or no pins would be grippier due to larger surface area). The sole of a 5.10 is almost as thick as a pedal, and your foot contorts around it as well, and add the aluminium body and your talking about a 60mm thick pedal. This is why no one has considered making prototypes, without talking about taking it to production.
  • + 1
 just take an old pair of skate shoes and put some screws around the perimeter so you don't put pressure on them. I make my own spiked wading boots for fishing the rivers and this method works perfect for algae-covered rock bed. Then you can take the pins out of your pedals entirely. You'd probably want a very thin diameter screw so it doesn't act as a hook on your pedals.
  • + 0
 I run straitlines whenever im on flats and shin strikes arent that bad.... wearing shin pads is worse those things are ridiculously uncomfortable, then again i only slip pedals when im pedaling in rough, if you angle your feet and weight the pedal you shouldnt be slipping them...
  • + 5
 Why don't we just use Velcro shoes and pedals? Ha
  • + 3
 What needs to happen is pedals that have a replaceable rubber sleeve (thick rubber band type thing) so rather than replacing the screws on your pedals you replace the rubber when it is needed. For shoes, you could make normal riding shoes with inserts for spikes (like the cleats on track and field shoes).
  • + 1
 Yes, Velcro pedals and shoes are just as ridiculous as rubber pedals and metal shoes. Shin guards arent a paint to wear if you buy good ones, and the chances of slipping pedals if you have good shoes and good pedals, don't cheap out on a $10 pair of pedals, and spend atleast $100 you will have less chance of pedal slaps. Also I am loving these pedals, they are a good price for what you get, I am planning on getting a pair to try out, they have room for improvement, but with more improvement, lets say titanium spindle, there comes a greater price. Can't wait to see another E 13 Pedal.
  • + 1
 What about a replaceable silicone cover that slips over the pedal like an ipod ? Would be grippy but not when wet ! also might not last too long but should not cost that much if such a thing existed.
  • + 1
 velcro pedals does sound a little bit to similar to SPD perhaps, you have more freedom of foot position though Smile
  • + 4
 SUPERGLUE!!! I wouldn't mind spending my whole life on a bike!
  • + 1
 I was thinking Rubber pedals would hurt if you hit your shins too, you would rip of skin if you caught one, they would grip to your skin and possibly tear some off. that would hurt more.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 well fuck, looks like i need one
  • + 7
 Only has one leg? Wink
  • + 17
 With current bike prices, its all i can afford :,(
  • - 6
 I would still go for a pair tho...
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Here's a thought about the spiked shoe and a pedal with 5.10 rubber idea. Isn't that the same stealth rubber used on rock climbing shoes because of how much traction it has....on ROCKS? Has anyone thought about what would happen when a pedal covered in stealth rubber struck a big embedded rock? That pedal sure wouldn't slide across the rock. I think it might halt your forward progress enough so as to pitch you off the other side of your bike.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I am running these with the 7mm pins on leading and trailing edges and the 4mm pins in the middle, and wear 5.10 impacts. incredible grip, i have had my feet get into some pretty precarious positions while flying into fast rocky sections and the grip is just amazing. ive also said since day 1 that the axles don't spin as freely as id like, but hopefully the updated seal kit with improve it. regardless, taking all factors into account, ive never had a better flat pedal
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Alot of companies going with bushings over bearings for pedals. Usually that means lightweight but not in e13 case, 480g is heavy these days. As far as the spin problem due to bushing friction, its really not that bad. I run the straitline amp, same issue according to pinkbike. Spins too slow for them? Well i been on them many miles and barely notice this issue. Did i really go slower because of pedals friction?? I think not, even high end sealed bearing pedals have similar friction. Those new traction pins look great. The plastic inserts seem a bit much and add weight. Should just use that skeleten piece with pins installed.
  • + 1
 Thats a good point, are the pedals able to run without the plastic? Anyone know?
  • + 3
 The plastic wearplates are an important part of the structure of the pedal and protecting their aluminum frame. They should not be run without the wearplates. - Chris @ e*thirteen
  • + 3
 @shishka - You often can't feel it through your legs when a disc is rubbing badly, but does it slow you down? Just because you can't feel it through your legs doesn't mean that it isn't hurting. I'm talking about trailing riding, obviously, not DHing.
  • + 1
 My legs are made of titanium so def not feeling it. I refferring to the amount of time it taking me to ride my home track. With diff pedals my times are always the same. Did i burn more calories to compensate for pedal friction??? Maybe but still not slowing me down. I have about 15 pairs of pedals here. Some spin like crazy and others not at all. I really dont feel a huge diff when mounted on bike.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 People kill me with this pedal weight thing on a DH bike. The average weight of a DH pedal is still in the neighborhood of 400g! Cramptons are 395g, Straitline SC 500g, Point One 359g, Spike 400g, Nukeproof Neutron 474g, Crank Bros 50/50 3 403g and the list goes on with no incredible weight savings. We applaud bike companies that build a durable frames at the cost of weight saving to allow us little guys years of abuse before needing buy a new frame, i.e. Transition, Banshee, Intense M series; why not pedals? At the retail $129 (it's not like you can't find them cheaper) is well worth a durable pedal that you can rebuild to like new at almost half the cost! And you still haven't reached the retail cost of Podiums, Ultimates, Straitline AMP, or the new HT or Nuke pedals.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've had crampons, got the first ones direct from Canfield into the UK. Been considering these e13s, then got rhee after this review... Just done 3 hours or gnarly push up tracks in the wet in wharncliffe.. With the stock pins., sombrio shoes.. God damn. Best grip and feel a flat pedal has ever delivered. That includes Burgtec, Canfield, straining, nukeproof. Amazin.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 They look even worse than metal pedals when beaten up ! E-13 will have a nice steady sale of plastic platforms from people who wanna keep them looking tidy , very clever.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Wow... really been wanting to try these and, after reading this, I only want to more!!! I'm still a bit surprised that they rate them above pedals like the PointOne's but I'm definitely down to keep an open mind and try them!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 [quote]we found that the gold tension adjustment dial can be quite hard to turn with your fingers (a small box wrench helps)[/quote] -

Its a spline drive, why not use a splined socket and do it properly ?
  • + 1
 It's meant to be turned with your fingers, spine or not.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I LOVE my E-13 Pedals Smile Get the job done in the way they were designed to and can easily be replaced, not like a lot of aluminum pedals that get bent up or trashed .
[Reply]
  • + 1
 CRAMPON ULTIMATE, I tried those out too. They look bitchen, but they aren't as wide as the crampon. I like the older pedals much better. So much grip
[Reply]
  • + 1
 they look like sick pedals but the price is a little steep. ill keep my cheapo pedals and drill and tap them if I want longer pins.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Have these pedals in white. Grip is phenomenal however has dug a big hole into my riding shoes
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Been using the FUNN pedals with grip tape in the middle forever, lookin to change it up, was pretty settled on crampons, but now i dunno... I'm sure I won't hate either.
  • - 1
 check it...http://www.funnmtb.com/products-detail.php?pid=70
  • + 1
 not bad... still think i want to try crampons or these, though. wish that page had thickness listed.
  • + 1
 14.7mm thickness with slight concave. Pins come in 7 colours
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Those pins are every riders worst nightmare if you slip of these pedals Eek
  • + 3
 But it says a lot of thought went into them? Which companies design should we steal????
  • + 1
 Only engineers can answer that question...
  • + 1
 These are much cheaper than the twenty6 ones though, although twenty6 is basically bike porn
[Reply]
  • + 1
 @anguswyatt, how about just walk with them, they are not crampons* i think it would be very easy especialy in the dirt..
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Get a good shoe and invest in a good pedal and u won't be slipping pedals anymore.... 5/10's and spank spike pedals are the "un-slippable" combo for me...
  • + 3
 I have to agree 5/10s with Shimano MX's or DX's cus I can't read what they said on them Big Grin
[Reply]
  • - 1
 e13 gear has always been good. Bmx brand Odyssey do similar plastic construction and using two pieces interlocking them using the pins. super well thought out peddle especially if you love a low bottom bracket.
  • + 1
 Yeah but the Odyssey pedals do not have an aluminum skeleton like the E.13 pedals do.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I don't see them gripping better than ht ae01, too much grip not always a good thing.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That's call in one word: "shiner"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have these pedal,THEY ARE SO SICK ! Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Soooo complicated. Liked more the RubberPedal...
[Reply]
  • - 3
 I can't see anything great about them. Is the plastic recyclable?
Thick, heavy, probably no stronger than other pedals.
I'll stick with my PO1NTs, I can add longer pins to them, and tighten the bearings if I don't want them to spin too much. They don't spin loosely anyway.
  • + 3
 Yes the plastic is recyclable!
  • + 1
 you seem to be the e-thirteen guy, what was your reason for putting in the spin control? I figured it'd be for your pedals to not spin around on you during tricks but with IGUS bushings that's not much of an issue, not hating just curious about it
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If the can be taught to spin I want them
[Reply]
  • - 1
 these are the pedals that aggy snapped off @ chatel leaving him unable to finish his run... i dont know how everybody else shops for pedals..
  • + 1
 Everything breaks. You can't judge a product by its failures unless its failure outweighs its success.
  • + 2
 square taper bottom brackets snapped off from time to time as well , they were over all successful much like this pedal.. tell that to all the riders with 37 stitches up there calf . yes things break.. i would prefer it not to be my pedal for much the same reason.. you can get stoked on your pedal that only fails one in a hundred.. i will stick to the other pedal that hasn't failed in the 20 years i have been on a bike.. besides , is this not a place to get the opinions of different experiences?
  • + 2
 seraph crankbros mallets have won several world cups, does that mean crankbros make good products? im halfway done trying with mallets, and shimano dx's have won barely anything and they're the most durable dh clipless out there
  • + 3
 No, because Crank Brothers' failures outweigh their successes.
  • + 1
 I guess that's true when hart/gwin/atherton/minnaar or the other riders break them its not like we'll know about it
[Reply]
  • + 1
 These or Spank Spikes?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 nice but not for $129
  • + 3
 Bloody hell, didn't spot that. Good luck selling them for that much.
  • + 1
 People buy tons of straightline pedals at $150ish, so I'd say there's definitely a market for them.
  • + 1
 at 482g for the pair?
  • + 1
 517g per pair with all 56 pins in, and absolutely, I have 2 sets. They're worth it for the toughness/grip.
  • + 1
 Edit, nvm. I thought you were referring to straightlines. These do weigh 482, you're correct about that.
  • + 1
 129 is bad for pedals nowadays? these ones will outlast many other pedals possibly including straitline for the wear plates (although id be amazed if i ever managed to break my straitlines) so its not a bad investment bushings=right bearings=wrong
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Does anyone know how thin/think they are?
  • + 1
 "At 21mm tall at the leading and trailing edges"
  • + 7
 "leading and trailing edges that measure 21mm thick, an 18mm height directly over the axle, and 15mm in the central webbed sections of the body. " It says this up the top in the first paragraph.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 My Camfield Crampon pedals FTW ! ! !
  • + 1
 i personally don't like thoses they are so thin that the area that the spindle goes through acts like a pivot on your foot so i never felt like i had full grip. my cousin has thoses e13 pedals and they are amazing, huge platform, and there customer service is amazing. my cousin managed to break something on them and e13 replaced the pedal in less then a week.
  • + 0
 Check out the new CRAMPON ULTIMATE.....Any issue that you thought you didn't like is resolved! The GRIP is insane with the new pins too! There is a contest on FACEBOOK to win a set! Nothing pedals as efficiently because you are pivoting so close to the spindle!
  • - 1
 Yeah, the new pedals fixed any issues people thought they were having with the old version. My next set of pedals will definitely be Canfield Crampon's. In 5 years, pedals as thick as these E13's won't exist. This is basically outdated technology already.
[Reply]
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