reverend

51, Husband, father of 2, teacher of history, Japanese and PE. Love coaching the Whatcom County Composite high school XC mtb team.

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reverend buspilot's photo
Aug 3, 2016 at 0:05
Aug 3, 2016
Thanks for sharing your pictures of this adventure. Fun to travel with you. Took my 20 year-old daughter for a 1,000 mile ride last week up into the Caribou and Chilcotin mountains before crossing back to Pemberton and Whistler and home. Check out those sections of the TCAT (Trans Canada Adventure Trail). We followed it from basically 100 Mile House to Horsefly Lake and then all the way to Vancouver. Good times.

reverend buspilot's photo
Jul 24, 2016 at 13:04
Jul 24, 2016
Fun how stable these bikes are catching a little air at speed. Cool to have a friend with whom to ride, especially if you travel in a similar manner and pace. I enjoyed the solo travel, and found myself rolling my eyes a little on the day I rode with 3 riders from Kenya in Utah, who were determined to follow exactly the UTBDR (Utah Backcountry Discovery Route) and it felt like every-other intersection, we had to turn around and take a different fork. Kind of killed the flow for me. Fortunately, the Kenyans were really cool people, so the push/pull of following the route vs. going with the flow was more palatable. But I'd want to be more aware of what I was getting into were I to travel with such a group.

reverend reverend's photo
Jul 24, 2016 at 12:50
Jul 24, 2016
@nikoniko: is there really any region in Japan that is not either a mountain region, or very close to a mountain region? Ok, maybe some spots in Hokkaido are pretty flat... In my last two years of high school in Japan (81-83), I rode a Yamaha RD 400 all over the Kanto, Tohoku and Chubu/Hokuriku regions. So many fond memories of amazing mountain roads, generous hospitality... Would love to tour there as an adult.

reverend buspilot's photo
Jul 24, 2016 at 12:43
Jul 24, 2016
All river crossings I encountered with that much water, were all very swift and rapid-filled, so I avoided them. Looks like a good challenge. The thought of dropping the 950 in deep fast-moving water while on my own did not sound appealing... for some reason.

reverend jasperwesselman's article
Jul 24, 2016 at 12:37
Jul 24, 2016
reverend reverend's photo
Jul 18, 2016 at 22:52
Jul 18, 2016
@sngltrkmnd: Both are good reads. I like the autobiographic nature of Desert Solitaire. MWG is a hoot, and easy to see how some like Earth First took off from Abbey's starting point.

reverend reverend's photo
Jul 18, 2016 at 1:00
Jul 18, 2016
...also went to Lake Powell since Edward Abbey hated it so much. Tried to imagine it with a river running through the canyon. Weird to see so many boats, and large ones, in the desert. Desert Solitaire and Monkey Wrench Gang are both required reading.

reverend reverend's photo
Jul 18, 2016 at 0:55
Jul 18, 2016
Busted the little arm off the lock mechanism so was unable to lock the bag to the frame after this crash. Nothing a couple of zip-ties couldn't remedy. This was a hot day, and I'd turned around from trying to find the "Hole in the Rock" because I'd run low on water and the temps were around 40ºc. This was a little wake-up call for me. Hot, tired, alone, low on water (only 2 liters at this point) and clear that no one else had traversed that road for some time. The 950 is a bit heavy, fully loaded, so I left the bag off and righted the bike, rode it out of the deeper sand, found a rock for the kick stand, and went back to get the pannier. My first intro to 'you have to figure it all out, or the consequences might not be too pleasant'. Makes one feel very alive. Love it.

reverend reverend's photo
Jul 18, 2016 at 0:55
Jul 18, 2016
Busted the little arm off the lock mechanism so was unable to lock the bag to the frame after this crash. Nothing a couple of zip-ties couldn't remedy. This was a hot day, and I'd turned around from trying to find the "Hole in the Rock" because I'd run low on water and the temps were around 40ºc. This was a little wake-up call for me. Hot, tired, alone, low on water (only 2 liters at this point) and clear that no one else had traversed that road for some time. The 950 is a bit heavy, fully loaded, so I left the bag off and righted the bike, rode it out of the deeper sand, found a rock for the kick stand, and went back to get the pannier. My first intro to 'you have to figure it all out, or the consequences might not be too pleasant'. Makes one feel very alive. Love it.

reverend reverend's photo
Jul 18, 2016 at 0:47
Jul 18, 2016
Yes, one tour. Picked the bike up in Southern California, rode north and east on interstate 15 through Las Vegas to St. George Utah, visited Gooseberry Mesa, Zion and Bryce Canyon National Parks before heading to Capitol Reef and through to Moab and Grand Junction Colorado. A couple of days in GJ with friends before riding to meet my high school friend in Crested Butte (aka Crusty Butt) and riding together over Cottonwood Pass on the way to his house. From there I headed north on the Great Divide Motorcycle Trail to Yellowstone where I peeled off and rode Beartooth Highway (Hwy 212) out from the North East Entrance (because it figures large in "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" A book everyone should read, by the way). From there I kept the mountains to my left as I headed generally West and North and wound up in Bozeman where I dropped in on some friends for a night. From there I made my way towards Helena Montana and then to Highway 2 and from there to Washington highway 20 for the last bit. 2 nights in hotel/cabin, several nights with friends and camping the rest. Total trip time 2 weeks. Still plan to try to get to Banff this summer and ride across BC on the Trans Canada Adventure Trail (TCAT if you want to google it)... maybe even get in the Vancouver Island bit if I can. We'll see! If not, it'll be another adventure for another time.

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