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wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 4, 2015 at 16:09
Sep 4, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
Think about the work put into old cars. Valves at 30k, front end rebuild at 60k, engine rebuild at 100k, along with tons of parts along the way. The materials are just better today. And antifreeze has been in use since the 50's, if you want to debate that pre 60's cars are reliable, you're a bit off. They're running today thanks to a lot of work and passion, nothing to do with the original design.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 4, 2015 at 5:40
Sep 4, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
They were unreliable in today's terms. But the water pump didn't have to last 100k,since the car fell apart around it. But for the most part, antifreeze is a good thing.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 3, 2015 at 17:28
Sep 3, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
That's where water wetter comes in. It'll lube and protect parts without reducing the heat capacity or conductivity near as much as antifreeze. But that's a different subject all together, but could help in my water brake test, since water is pretty corrosive.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 3, 2015 at 9:46
Sep 3, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
I think another paper I skimmed looked at caliper temp. They're still limited since the weight differences are have an effect. I might start a thread somewhere to keep things more organized.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 3, 2015 at 8:03
Sep 3, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
Dot 3 or 4 I'm pretty sure that the heat capacity of brake fluid is less than water, cabtcan't find any hard numbers, but most fluids have a heat capacity of about half of water. The main limits would be designing a caliper to transfer a minimal amount of heat to the fluid. Which should be done already. If I really get bored, I'll plug the models into Matlab with masses and materials used with bikes.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 3, 2015 at 7:10
Sep 3, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
Did some digging, because unlike most people assume, bikes aren't the first thing to look at these kinds of problems. So, here's some test data from Adriaan Neys from Chalmers university. Note how cool the fluid is compared to everything else, this is for a car, so the masses of different components will vary, but I doubt bike components will reach these kinds of temperatures. http://i924.photobucket.com/albums/ad83/wetbed0/Untitled_zpsesvtxok8.jpg
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 3, 2015 at 6:51
Sep 3, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
Miss typed(unit conversion) 30% reduction. So, more considerable. Fluid volume was 3.46 mL, calculated from hose ID and 1000mm length. So, I could either try to do a lot more math, or possibly try it out, in a controlled, only running water in one brake kinda way.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 2, 2015 at 18:00
Sep 2, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
Ran it with Magura blood(boil at 140C) only a 2.7% reduction in energy capacity by switching to water. Since all of my assumptions are held constant, the comparison should be somewhat viable, and if your brakes stay cooler, your pads rotors and seals should last better too. I may run a test with an elixer I have laying around and report back.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Sep 2, 2015 at 17:52
Sep 2, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
True, there's a lot going on here. I didn't take the time to look at any heat transfer throughout the system, but I did make some basic calculations earlier today. So, assuming all of the fluid heats uniformly (Not entirely correct), that the caliper heats uniformly( also not correct), that the rotor heats evenly( still kinda far off), and that every part of the system is at the same temperature (Pretty far from true), the water based system is down about 60% on heat capacity due to the limited temperature range vs shimano mineral oil. I may run the numbers again, on this very simplified system, with magura blood (Boils at 140C vs 280C for shimano) and see how water stacks up against a fluid that is still viable in a common braking system.
wetbed0 paulaston's article
Aug 29, 2015 at 8:19
Aug 29, 2015
Hardcore German Tech(no?) - Eurobike 2015
Time for the links. http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/85231-when-bleeding-magura-hs33s-water.html http://www.trials-forum.co.uk/topic/162904-questions-on-water-bled-maguras/ I've read about water bled discs, but can only find so much from the bus. It's also a lot easier to bleed your brakes when you can just dunk them in a 5 gallon bucket.
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