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How to Remove 48 Spline Cranks

tools: hammer/mallet, allen key (6 or 8mm), and a socket extension

26 Comments

  • + 3
 Your cranks shouldn't slide on that easy
  • + 2
 If installed correctly they should. That's what the little pouch of grease that comes with them is for. Parts (like cranks) are made and designed to be assembled and disassembled without friction. Otherwise they'd hardly be precision parts.
  • + 0
 They should not slide on that easy is right, the crank is supposed to be pressed on by a tool that comes with the cranks ( or just use your bolt like most normal people )
  • + 2
 i've had various sets of cranks that slide on and off without a tool, these were a bit TOO easy, but the rest have slid right on.
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  • + 1
 might a recomment for others to use a mallet Wink easier on your bike and easier on what ever your using as an extension say a socket extension.
  • + 2
 read the description
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  • + 1
 mallet is best, a hammer + piece of wood is generally a no no but if you don't have a mallet it's all you can use. or brute force
  • - 1
 or get a towel or sumthing and put the towel on the crank and hit it with a hammer i used it =] not a scratch =P
  • + 2
 but that takes some of the impact out, best use a mallet
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  • + 1
 The cranks that came on my bike are 8 spline and it's a MID BB, so if I get new 48 spline cranks do I need a whole new BB?
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  • + 1
 or use a spare crank colt and lossen it and beat it with a hammer, work evey time for my, but the socket extension is smart
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  • - 2
 Eek WOW!! Eek

Talk about the absolute WRONG way to remove and install cranks!
The title of this video should be "How NOT to remove 48 spline cranks".

There is such a thing as a crank arm removal tool. Also a crank arm installation tool.
I'm guessing you don't know what those are. Frown
  • + 1
 what if you don't have money for tools or you forgot your tools at home?
  • + 1
 there's nothing wrong with putting pressure on a solid steel spindle...
  • + 0
 Well, I'm not sure I remember the last time I saw anyone out riding with a hammer hanging out of their pocket. Seems like an awkward choice of tool to carry with you while out riding. Also, most crank sets these days come with the proper tools. They are also a tenth the size and weight of a hammer.
Lastly, this demonstration also demonstrates the misuse of these tools as well as how to remove/install crank arms & spindle.
  • + 1
 i nowhere said this is how to do it when out riding, ideally if you maintain your parts they should slide apart by pulling like these could have. for the record, i have resorted to using a socket the side of the spindle rather than an extension, this evenly disperses the impact around the spindle, making it harmless
  • + 1
 I was referring to bret, but the thing with the socket extension won't work on all cranks. Yours happened to have a small arm bolt. A lot of sets use larger diameter bolts. With these, the socket extension could damage the threads in the spindle. Also, the impacts on the spindle with another piece of steel slowly cause it to mushroom out. After a while it won't fit together properly. If installed correctly the first time, crank arms should slide right off the spindles with no need for any impacts. Also, the spindle should slide in and out of the BB with no friction. It all comes down to weather or not the BB shell was sanded out and or all the paint and powdercoat removed before the bearings were put in. Also, crank sets come with a little pouch full of crease. Most kids just throw it away and prefer beating their parts with a hammer, but if used correctly everything installs and removes without a beating.
  • + 1
 i jsut knock mink off with a brick usually, works a treat
  • + 1
 In Gary's world he is always right guys. There is no point telling him he is wrong. He is saying the correct proper way to do it but won't accept that there are lots of ways to do things proper. Gary if you don't put in on perfect and then when you go to slide it off it doesn't come off and you don't have tools then what do you do?
  • + 1
 Ignoring Bret's lack of poetry......

If anything, giving the arm a tap or two should be all you need. If installed correctly there should never be a need for a hammer. I saw a video posted on here a while back where a guy had his bike in a stand and was swinging a huge mallet like a baseball bat. So hard it had nearly knocked his bike and stand over. This was also a "how to" video. Pretty much when it comes to bike maintenance, a hammer should not be a part of the required tools.
  • + 1
 In some cases (profile for example) require the use of a mallet, however with specific instructions and crank arm removal tool designed to be struck with it. No matter what, a hammer and a socket extension is not the proper way to get this done, nor is it the proper use of the tools themselves.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 would this work a mtn bike too?
  • + 1
 depends on what mtb cranks but usually no you might need a crank puller cause most mtb bearings are threaded in..
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  • + 1
 I use my old 14mm axle with wheel nut on the end. easy as yours Smile
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  • + 1
 OMG! i'm a stupid! Smile
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