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Roco Air tst overhaul

Marzocchi Roco air tst overhaul and oil change.

92 Comments

  • + 2
 thanks for that mate.I have a mate with this air shock and he needs a service on it.I have your phone number so if i get stuck i will call you hahahahaha......i have written all the steps down so should be fine...you are a tech Geek bro and we love you for that.....ride on big man
  • + 3
 hahahhahahahha Thank you mate! If I can be of any help please just mail me or yes give me a call. This was a light run through on how to overhaul the shock. This procedure will work for any shock with an air valve air or coil. Thank you for the positive reenforcement! RideOn Brother!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Damn! Really good! Smile I was wondering..have you ever serviced or taken apart a Marz Roco Air LO? I want to buy one for a new build and I would like to know how to service it. I always liked marzocchi with theyre "home serviceable" stuff.
  • + 1
 Sorry mate!

The Marz LO will most likely be an awesome ride but it does not have an external air valve, so you couldn't service it. (take out the oil an change it)

You could however service the air sleeve and grease it up.

I do however recommend the LO it looks awesome!

Thank you for the complements!
RideOn mate!
  • + 1
 No worries m8! I got a tst instead and it's awsome! Now thanks to you I know how to overhaul it. Btw can an english guy visit japan without knowing japanese? :p I always loved the place in springtime (from seeing pictures)
  • + 1
 Yes, spring time is superb! Warm but still a bit chilly. As for not know Japanese you can get by pretty good depending where you are. But, most anyone know enough english to give direction or help you in a tight situation! Well, I hope the tst works out for you, the advantage is you can overhaul it yourself! ahhahahhahahha RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hi Nico. First of all, THANKS A LOT for making such a great video! I just purchased a used Roco Air TST R and it feels like it would welcome a good overhaul. I've watched your video about 30 times, and also got the factory IFP heights from here: marzocchiworkshop.blogspot.com.ar/2013/02/service-guide-roco-rc-coil-shock.html.

Now I have a couple of questions:

1- What kind of grease should I use to lube the seals and o-rings when reassembling the shock?
2- What kind of degreaser do you recommend so the seals and quad-rings won't get damaged? Is it OK to use isopropyl alcohol spray?

Again, thanks A LOT for your time and patience.
  • + 1
 Thank you brother! Im very happy you enjoyed it! As for the IFP heights you can go lower or deeper for a more linear feel or you can move it up hight in the chamber making a more progressive ride, just make sure the IFP isn't too high! 1. For the grease there are lots on the market. Im using either shimano hub grease or slick honey. You can also use rock shocks judy butter. 2-If you can put isopropyl alcohol in a spry bottle that will work best. However here in Japan I cant buy isopropyl alcohol inexpensively so, Im just using a regular parts cleaner. Its always worked very well however Im very sure alcohol is much safer for the seals. Lets me know if you have any other questions, I will do my best to help out! Yesterday, I overhauled my Vivid air. It came out good but, if I could get another Roco that would be awesome. The roco has been my favorite shock to date! RideOn mate! Niko
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hi niko, a huge thanks for taking the time to post informative vids like this one. Very detailed and easy to follow. As a total noob to the world of dual suspensions, I recently picked up a used bike that came with a roco tst on the rear and it doesn't seem to hold any air in either cannister when I tried pumping up with a shock pump. Am I missing something simple or is the shock broken and in need of repair? Cheers and thanks for any suggestions!
  • + 1
 MrGreen I sent you a personal message! Please take a look mate! RideOn, Niko
[Reply]
  • + 1
 hi, is there a way to modify travel with how much oil you put in? i have roco tst with trail switch, ith has adjusted shaft travel to 2.25" for my 650b conversion. it is tuned from bike co and they told me travel can be changed by oil volume used. i would like to be able to switch to full travel (2.5") for my 26" wheels for park ride days. any idea on this?
  • + 1
 Sorry Brother!
There is no way to reduce the travel with oil.

However if you were to created spacers making the main piston sit further in the shock body, then yes maybe you could reduce the travel.

However, I personally would recommend just getting a simple air shock for 2-3 hundred dollars rather than trying to reduce the travel.

So, if your current shock is 2.5 just purchase a 2.25 eye to eye shock and that would be much easier because to overhaul your shock each time would damage your seals and threads over time.

However on other aspect to take into consideration is if, you had a shock with a shorter eye to eye you would have to measure the where it bottoms out.
The shorter shock body might be too short and the rear wheel could possibly bottom out hitting your seat stay or other damage as well.

What you do think?

I have a simple x-fusion on my other bike now, it feels great!
It had just air,rebound and lockout!
Something like that would be killer!
Here is a link!

www.xfusionshox.com/product/shocks/o2-series/rlx.html
  • + 1
 thanks niko,
now i wander what the guy from bike co meant by telling me they can use oil volumes to manipulate travel. this roco is 8.5" eye to eye with 3" long shaft. he said he can limit shaft travel at any point. of course for my 26" version at 2.5" max and for 650b conversionn at 2.25" max to prevent damage from bottomout. so you are saying that only way to limit travel is by installing shims? i have been doing this with my previous shock rp23. the only reason i want to be able to use this shock in both modes is because it isjust so much better than rp23.
  • + 1
 I have no idea dude, because that makes no sense at all! Im sorry not shims you would have to install a spacer to reduce the piston rod from extending fully behind the shim stack in a way to not correspond with rebound or compression functions. Which could work but I would recommend getting a new shock in a shorter version like the 2.5 then just swap it out. However oil and shims would have an effect on how the shock performs but not reduce the travel. Yes, keep this quite but the RP23 is junk compared to the Roco. It rides good but bottoms like crazy where the roco is smooth form soft bumps to huge its! rideOn bro!
  • + 1
 niko,
when you say bleed screw in your responses in regards of bleeding the shock, do you mean the screw that holds ifp or the screw at the tail of the shock? is it 5wt oil that is recommended for the shock?
thanks
  • + 1
 Yes, sorry! First with IFP out of the piggy you want to slowly pour oil in the piggy back and let it start settling. Its important to go slow so you are not creating any bubbles, like beer if you pour it fast you will have lots of foam so go slow. Then, fill the piggy full of oil and slowly drop the IFP with the screw out in the piggy back. Let just naturally settle in, then cover the hole with your thumb or finger and push it in some. After that using the IFP slowly bleed the shock. letting it rest is important as when there is air bubbles form easy.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great video.
My shock makes a lot of noise is that due to air in the system? I see no oil leaking.

I am also having problems setting up my roco wc air 9.5x3 not sure on where the compression should be. I ride dh and freeride.

Any tips would be great.
  • + 1
 It might be due to air thats trapped in the chambers, taking all the air out and then taking off the outer cans then some fresh grease might take away the unwanted noise! In this video the first couple of steps is all you need to do then put the air cans on which will reset the negative air chamber and give you a very smooth ride! The compression in the WC is highspeed so, if your doing lots of jumps and drops keep it about 5-8 clicks open from fully closed. If your just riding generally fast DH runs I say run the compression in the middle. And if your just wanting to use all your travel and go as fast as you can, run the compression 5-8 clicks closed from fully open! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 great video!
I've been searching some info to service this shox for ages, Unfortunately I'm not so good in mech stuff,
Anyway I still couldn't understand
1- how and with which tool you took off the first seal out of the big canister
2- which grease did you use?
3-the procedure to fill it up with oil. How much oil did you put in it?
Do you stll have the original video with this procedure at normal speed?
thanks very much
  • + 1
 Thank you very much!
I need to make more video for people who need to know!

The steel seal?
I used two screw drivers the then you just press outward on both sides.

As for oil, there is no way to measure on a rear shock.
you have to balance the oil from the piggy back and keep pushing air out.
When you have a bubble free system then you just have to set the ifp's level height and your set.

When you are finished, push on the ifp piston if its hard there is no air in the system if it steel feels spongy you need to bleed more air out!

Sorry, I dont have the original footage.
If I did it would be about 30-40 minutes long as I bled the shock!

Just ask me any questions and I can maybe help when you are overhauling the shock!

Good luck mate!
  • + 1
 thanks.
I saw you first poured oil in the main black can (how much?), then you screwed the body, and finally bled it through the piggy. Should I bled the piggy with the ifp piston in it ot put it later?thanks
  • + 1
 At first its just as much as you can get in without too much spilling. There wont be enough because when you flip the shock it the piggy back is empty. So,then with the ifp piston out fill the piggy back until its full and start slowly very slowly bleed the air out. Then when you think most of the air is out you add the ifp and then bleed with the ifp in. I compress the shock and then feel the piggy with oil, then I slide in the ifp just past the threads on the inside. Then, screw in the middle screw and place the top cap on. I then feel the piggy back up with air and that pushes all the oil though the system. Then, take off the top cap and fill some oil over the ifp. With a pair of needle nose pliers pull on the ifp and this will sort of vacuum out all the air. Then, I take out the middle screw making sure there is enough oil on top. When you take out the screw air bubbles should rise up! Then I pull the ifp higher in the piggy back and reset the screw. Push on the ifp and it will either fill spongy or very firm. Then with the shock fully extended I add the top cap and fill it with 100psi. then with you hand cycle the shock and this will further push oil though the system bring all the air to the ifp. Open it up and keep doing this until no more bubbles come up! Finally the ifp should feel rock hard when set air free! RideOn!
  • + 1
 thanks no much for details, As soon as I'll get some good stuff to drink before I'm gonna try it. I'll let you know for sure. Thanks again, Of course If you pass by here in Turin, you're welcome for a ride on the alps. cheers
  • + 1
 Oh WOW, I would love to ride the alps with you buddy! Thank you Very much! Good luck with your overhaul and feel free to ask more questions. It all makes more sense when your in the build. RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Perfect!

I'm just about to dive into a WC air rebuild and service, this is exactly what I needed to see!!

One thing, I find the WC air plush but for my frame it lacks a little LSC, so my plan was to mod the compression shim stack a little bit, either add a small amount of preload to the stack or change the shims.

Do you know what the hole dia for the shims is?
  • + 1
 Thank you! I too felt the same so instead of messing with the shims, I'm using 15wt oil with a little more air so just a tad bit less sag than normal. However the piston's shims are easy to change or increase if you want. The head comes off with a twist of an allen wrench, and then you can add more shims. The diameter for the shims are 8mm but what size circumference you will need Im not sure of. Good luck let me know if you have some questions!
  • + 1
 the circumference is 2 x Pi x Radius.
So, if the radius is 4mm the circumference will be 25.132mm
Edit: This was a really old comment, oh well! Maybe it'll be useful to someone Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hi ,

I took my shock apart but ran into some problems.

I couldn't get the ifp to the right height do you think it is because i put to much oil in?

and the main chamber will not fill up with air.

Any help would be great.
  • + 1
 Take out the bleed screw to bleed out air and oil from the ifp. The middle hole in the ifp will allow you to take out any extra oil or add more while bleeding out all the unwanted cavitation. Then you can slowly slide the ifp to the right position. Please give it a try! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Oh you're such an AirTST when it comes to shock service Smile

And stop drinking suspension oil! Is that how you deal with your problems?

Thanks for the vid, If I ever buy a frame with Roco I'll appreciate it!
  • + 1
 hahahhahaha Very cleaver there mate! The suspension oil lubes your vital internals allowing for more play, ahahahhahah The roco is a super smooth shock, I recommend it hands down. For those who like a coil like air shock this one is pretty good!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Can you go into some more detail on how to get all the air out of the shock? I have a Roco TST coil and the damper for the two is almost identical. It's brand new but I want to tinker with it, Thanks for the video!
  • + 2
 Yes, its very important there is no air in the system.
The coil version is much simpler as the piggy back is on the opposite side.
For a coil simply fill the main chamber with oil then before hand have your shim stack saturated in oil.
Then slide the shim stack rod into the main body overflowing the oil and your 90% to get an air free system on the first go.

For the air shock on the other hand its very complicated but as you saw in the video, I just slowly balance oil from the piggy back regulating it into the main body by filling the piggy back up then putting the cap on and cycling the shaft very slowly until I here or feel the oil filling the chamber.
It usually takes 2-6 times.
Then, when I know there is oil in the main chamber, I fill the piggy back up completely with the shaft fully compressed.
Then I slide in the IFP piston and put on the top cap.
Next, I fill the piggyback with air and without cycling the shock I then remove all the air and open the piggyback.
I first push on the IFP and if its rock hard your good to go.
If its feeling kind of spongy then you have to open the bleed screw and with oil on top and remove more bubbles.
Its sort of a bubble game for 2-6 times until you get the piston feeling solid.
If you try it you will understand more.

Last, you need to set the IFP's height in the piggyback.
A lower or deeper setting will give you a more linear ride and a higher setting will give the full stork a more progressive ride.
But, if its too high you won't get full travel.

Please tinker and let me know if you run into a question!

RideOn!
  • + 1
 Thanks a lot man! When I get around to rebuild it I'll be sure to reference this and let you know how it goes.
  • + 2
 Awesome, Just mail me with any question and I will walk you through it. Overall its really easy just very tedious and time consuming. But, with your garage skills you will have no problem. RideOn!
  • + 1
 So when you first reassemble the shock, you put the IFP at a minimum depth with the shock fully compressed, so when you replace the top cap and add air to the piggyback it extends the shock to its full travel while moving the IFP down to it's proper depth?

If so I've never heard of someone using that method before but it's pretty clever. Most tutorials I have read say to add the IFP with the shock fully extended and bleed screw removed, then push it to proper depth using your fingers, and replacing the bleed screw before pumping up the shock.

Can't wait to break this thing open and TINKER!
  • + 2
 Yes, thats correct, then as it extends to proper depth you are pushing all the oil into the main chamber, this also allows air to be pushed out and you can then bleed the air out. I repete the 3-4 times until the IFP becomes solid to the push. After the shock is fully free of air then yes, I add oil on top to of the IFP open the bleed screw and then set the proper depth if necessary. I run my shock very progressive as I dont want to bottom out so, I usually run my IFP high in the chamber. When opening the shock the only real danger is stripping a screw and damaging the seals so just be careful, other wise any problem can be fixed. Have fun buddy! RideOn!
  • + 1
 Sweet. My shock is functioning great but making a high pitched squeak on the rebound stroke, I think that is a sign of cavitation so I will take it apart soon and try out your method. What oil weight do you recommend for it? And have you done any modifications to the shim stack?

Thanks again for sharing the knowledge!
  • + 2
 Yes, on my coil roco I played with the shims but unless your bike has a really high leverage ratio its not necessary. I found that changing the oil works better for me and I don't have to buy shims. So, for example if your shock feels too soft and under damped even with lots of compression, you can either use 10wt or like I did 15 wt oil. If you had extra shims you can add more but it really does change the ride and you would have to keep overhauling your shock to get the right combo, which I did, ahahhaahahha I dont know what the squeak is but if could be a slight amount of cavitation or just a funny phenomenon with your rebound. If you do overhaul your shock I recommend starting with 10wt oil which is just a little bit heavier than the stock oil. RideOn buddy!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 congrats niko Big Grin never seen any one service a roco air... i am so regreated i didnt bought the dhx5 air for my bike Frown i bought the spring dhx5... cuzz everyone was telling me to dont buy the air and buy the coil one... Frown
  • + 1
 The rear shock are the same as the forks, just you have to make sure you dont build it up with any air in the system. The dhx coil is much better than the air from fox but the roco is up to par with any coil shock for sure! RideOn!
  • + 0
 i know ... the reason i didnt bought the air shock is because everybody was telling me it would bring me trouble... like leaks and thinks like that...
  • + 1
 hhahahahahhahhahahahah thats funny!
  • + 1
 niko im going to buy a dhx5 air by the way... do you know if the procedure are the same of this roco? just in case i have to rebuild it... im just woried about the air can the rest for me its just bleeding and give the right measures on the piggy back... and by the way the air can doesnt have to be filled with nitrogen right? hope to hear about you soon you have been very usefull and great mate with everybody you have the spirit that only few have... guys like you are rare in these days Wink
Ride On Brother!
Cheers!
  • + 1
 Yes, I have overhauled the fox many times as well. The procedure is exactly the same as the roco! Both shocks look identical inside, but they ride different, ahahahhha The air can is easy to take off and clean, it can be filled with regular air. I dont have a means of filling it with nitrogen, Im quite sure there really in no big advantage to nitrogen other than it hold up to heat and leaking a tad better! Thank you very much for the kind words brother! I hope everyone has a kind heart! I hope this video can help when you need to overhaul your fox! RideOn Brother and have a Happy New Year!
  • + 1
 thanks alot nico ... i think the air can is loosing pressure ... since im rebuilding it should i replace all the o-rings like on the damping too or just replace the o-rings of the air can?

by the way happy new year for you too Wink
Ride On!
  • + 1
 The o-rings if you can always change them when you overhaul your shock. However, I never have on this roco even after 4 years. The air cans o-rings can be tricky, if you get too much grease on them they will leak. So, I usually grease them well then wipe them off with a clean lint free towel. If so, they should not leak even if old. However if they still continue to leak you must change them out! RideOn brother!
  • + 1
 is it possible to pass air from the air can to the damping if i empty the piggyback with pressure in the air can?
  • + 1
 No, its totally a different chamber. The air can is like a coil spring on the damper. The piggy back's air puts pressure on the internal floating piston making the damping. Then, the air can's air provides the overall stiffness to the shock.
  • + 1
 thats what i thought... so the air can is definitly loosing pressure when i ride it when its suposed to be riden... HARD Razz air can o-rings and fox float fluid coming soon lets see... its like a guy on youtube told that the air pressure can pass too the damping if the air can has pressure and the damping dont...
  • + 1
 Yes, its sounds like you need new seals! Well, if your piggyback's air pressure is low thats not good and you might get air in your dampening. But, not from the main air can. The internal floating piston in the piggy back needs pressure to keep it pushing on the oil consistently. If not then yes your shock can get some cavitation.
  • + 1
 ill try to bleed the damping thanks again niko
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If you use 15wt oil in the sleeve to allow for less air in the canister, What weight oil should I be using for higher pressures?
  • + 2
 Im sorry mate, I don't follow your question. I only used 15wt oil in the main damper body, then in the large air can I used slick honey grease. The more grease you use, the lower the air volume so a more progressive ride. Then, the second step air can or the outer sleeve just a slight lather of slick honey is necessary. As for higher air pressures like myself, 15wt oil should do great in the damper. I usually ran my Roco at about 180-200psi on my last bike, but that ranges differently on your bike's ratio.
  • + 1
 Ahhh! Thank you very much! Smile
  • + 1
 Did that make sense?
  • + 1
 yeah, it did! Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hats off, if I tried to do the same, I'd only mess things up lol
Glad your Roco is in good shape again!
  • + 1
 ahahhahahah Im sure you could do better than that, ahahahhahahh The roco is in great shape but I still need to gather a seal kit from somewhere.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Very helpful tutorial ! But could you tell me how much oil you should put in ?
  • + 1
 Thank you!

Well, I would say about 50-70mm of oil but its not exact.
Once you fill the main chamber, (2:35 in the video)
Then you need to flip the shock and fill the piggy back.

After that, you have to just keep extracting air from the system. It can be very laborious and takes about 3-4 hours.
I let the shock sit once I think its has no more air then, bleed the system.

You have to set the floating piston at your desired height as well which creates more or less oil.

Unlike a fork which you just fill and go the rear shock's oil need to be as 100% air free as possible rather than how much oil you fill it with.

I hope that made some sense!
RideOn dude!
  • + 1
 Thanks very much !
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that was very good man !!!...will have to take another good look at it but it was perfect...how's the Rocco now ???
  • + 1
 Thank you buddy! The roco is awesome, I have this one for 4 years now so, its been overhauled and set to perfection for a long time. I just have been wanting to do this video for some time as the roco comes on a lot of complete bikes and its potential is yet to be seen as most people can't set it up properly. I love my roco, ahahhahah RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Dang, that was a good video.... better than a lot of companies can do - LOL... Nice work. Thank You.
  • + 1
 Thank you buddy! This video came together nicely! The Roco is a great shock! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This was a great video man. Thanks for showing all of us such a complete proceedure! TeachOn bro!
  • + 1
 Thank you brother! I will continue to teach and do my best in all situations! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this makes me want to buy one of these shocks just so i can take it apart and put it back together again!
  • + 1
 hhahahahhhahahha You might just fall in love with it like I did! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great operation niko!
Marzocchi should hire you Razz
  • + 1
 Yes, Please call them and give them your recommendation. ahahhahahha That would be cool to work for a suspension company. However Im too busy to even ride at the moment with my own business and working 2 job might kill me, ahhhhahahha RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Make sure you oiled yourself before a shock service, nice one. RideOn!
  • + 1
 Yes, if Im not oiled and lubed Im just a grumpy old fart, ahahahhahah RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 another great vid Big Grin ,Ride On
  • + 1
 Thank you mate! The roco air is a killer shock!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Nice man !
You know your bike tup

Keep on with the good stuff Big Grin
  • + 1
 Thank you buddy! I love to ride and build as well! Its fun getting to know your bike, ahahha RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Niko,you are joker man! Smile
  • + 1
 hahahah thank you buddy! Yes, Im a joker! RideOn!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 great vid...GREAT SONG....
  • + 1
 I love this song too! With whiskey flow in me it feels so nice!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Awesome! to bad i dont have a roco that needs to be rebuilt!!!! hahahaha
  • + 1
 hhahahhahhaha
Someday maybe?

RideOn dude!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great vid with good workmanship dude! Smile
  • + 2
 Thank you, I hope to do more videos like this when I have the time. Its actually really had to work and film at the same time. Also its impossible to get in every little step unless you want a 2 hour video, ahhahahhaha RideOn matey!
  • + 1
 Hahaha yeah i had the same problem hahah, looking forward to the next one all ready matey.
  • + 1
 thank you mate! Is there a fix or overhaul you want to see. My forte is suspension but I can do it all like you. Now that summer is here I would like to do another shop video on a Hot afternoon.
  • + 1
 I wouldnt mind seeing the inside of you suntour's... they look great im thinking about getting some. Smile
  • + 1
 This is a video on how to oil change the damper rod.

www.pinkbike.com/video/210368


Then this is on how to change the travel.


www.pinkbike.com/video/215831


Im loving my durolux, its rides like the 36 float and feels just as smooth!

You would love it.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 bike shop man!!
  • + 1
 Hair shop man!
[Reply]

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