Being scammed over Paypal (Read 1st post)

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Being scammed over Paypal (Read 1st post)
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Posted: Aug 20, 2010 at 10:41 Quote
NOTE: Read **BuySell Safety & Tips for your full information.

I was looking over a few of the threads for being scammed and I beleive a guide for paypal scams should be made since it has happened to me and it shouldn't happen to anyone.

When you consider the safest possible way to do a transaction for selling your bike you think face to face right? But what if local isn't possible and COD isnt an option? Paypal comes to mind. Paypal brags about being safe and reliable. But you can even be scammed over paypal.

What happened to me was:

I was contacted through PM about my NS Majesty. I told the user that since it was going from Canada to the UK, I would only do paypal. The user agreed and I received the users paypal address to make the transaction. I requested the funds and shortly after received an email saying I had got the funds.

Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y75/solarboydjango/paypalscam.jpg
The email also stated that "your funds have been received but may take a few days to show up in your account". Seeing as how it was an international transaction, I beleievd this... my biggest mistake.

I was planning on waiting to actually see the money before shipping. But the user told me as it was for “theirs sons birthday” they would have to cancel the transaction if I did not ship soon. I contacted paypal to ask when my money would be received. They said the user still needed to accept. I told the user this and they said they paid. They then claimed to have talked with paypal as well and that paypal would email me to explain.

I received an email from services@paypal.com. At the time, the email address and contents seemed legit. The email specified that the money was taken out and it was a problem on paypals end. They also told me to ship off my product.

Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y75/solarboydjango/paypalscam2.jpg
I did so. A few days later, still not seeing the money, I contacted paypal. I read them both emails and they alerted me that it was fraudulent. I was scammed.

What the user did was:

The two emails I received were fake. The first saying I received the money, and the second stating that the money was coming and to send the package. The first email had paypals logo and was a duplicate of the real deal. The second having what seemed to be a legit paypal address from customer service.

Summary:

1. You can even be scammed over paypal.
2. Paypal transactions are instant. So if they say it may take a few days it’s a scam
3. Never ship without seeing the money first if doing over paypal.
4. Paypal will NEVER tell you to ship out your package
5. If the email contains attachments (you can see a paperclip icon in your email box) its a fake. Paypals logos are imbedded in the email do not require any attachments.

I hope no one here falls victim to a paypal scam... Please learn from my mistake.


**MERGED THIS THREAD WITH MY OLD ONE**

Read the following tips, and if you need advice, just ask. I (Psyclist) am on here quite a lot.

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-If the email says 'Dear customer' or anything like that, it's a scam email. Paypal ALWAYS call by your full name.

-Paypal transactions are instant. If the emails says it may take a few days it’s a scam.

-Never ship without seeing the money first.

-Paypal will NEVER tell you to ship out your package.

- If the email contains attachments (you can see a paper-clip icon in your email box) it's a fake. Paypals logos are embedded in the email do not require any attachments.

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Here is a printscreen I took from Paypal which is pretty self explanatory.


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Signs To Look Out For

There are plenty of scams using Paypal's name

1 - they send you an email saying money has been sent but due to new security measures it will not be credited until you send the tracking info. So you send the item, email the tracking info, then check Paypal and there is NO money in your account. You call Paypal who tells you they never emailed you, there was no transaction and they NEVER ask for tracking info before crediting your account

2 - they send you money from a hacked Paypal account, you ship the item, then the real account holder discovers the theft, reports it to Paypal and the money is refunded from your account

3 - they send you a fake Paypal email saying money has been sent but you have to click on a link to verify the transaction - which leads you to a fake but real looking Paypal log-in page that you log into -- and you just got your account hacked

4 - they send you money from a real Paypal account, ask you to ship to a certain address, then file a chargeback. If you did not check with Paypal that the address they gave you was the "verified" address and you sent anywhere but the verified address, they claim they never received the item and Paypal refunds them. It doesn't matter if you have proof it was delivered to the other address along with an email from the buyer telling you to ship to that address. If you ship anywhere but the verified Paypal mailing address, you have NO protection and Paypal will always side with the buyer

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Remember to look out for the following on emails to spot a fake:

-The first thing to check is who the email addresses. Does it say Dear (or dear paypal member) and then have your full name? If not then it’s definitely not a genuine email from PayPal.

-Paypal NEVER ask you to enter sensitive log in info via a link in an email or by downloading an attachment.

-Email addresses from fraudulent websites/emails can be faked easily. To give you a false sense of security, the 'From' field may include an email address which looks like it is from a trusted brand. Beware, email addresses can be altered easily.

-Scams usually tend to have a tendancy to rush you with urgency. Most phishing emails threaten that your account will be in jeopardy if you do not undertake some action immediately. An email that urgently requests you to supply sensitive personal information is usually an attempt at fraud.

-Fake links can hack your computer just by clicking on them, so beware! Many phishing emails have links which look valid, but send you to a fake site. Always check where a link is going before you click: move your mouse over the URL in the email and look at the URL in the browser. As always, if it looks suspicious, don't click it. Open a new browser window and type the URL, for example www.paypal.co.uk or www.natwest.co.uk.

-Attachments in phishing emails are dangerous. Never click on an attachment in a suspicious or unusual email: it may download spyware or a virus on your computer. PayPal (and most reputable companies) will never email you an attachment or a software update to install on your computer.

-Some fraudsters will insert a fake browser address bar over the real one, making it appear that you're on a legitimate website. Just because a URL contains the word 'PayPal', doesn't mean it is PayPal.

Examples of fake PayPal addresses: http://signin.paypal.com@10.19.32.4 http://83.16.123.18/pp/update.htm?=https://www.paypal.com/=cmd_login_access www.secure-paypal.com

Always log in to PayPal by opening a new browser and typing in the following: https://www.paypal.com

The term 'https' should precede any web address (or URL) where you enter personal information. The "s" stands for secure. If you don't see "https," you're not in a secure web session and you should not enter any personal data

-Look out for the lock icon and if it's out of place. Make sure there is a secure lock icon in the status bar at the bottom of the browser window. Many fake sites will put this icon elsewhere on the page to deceive you.

-Look out for the logo, design and type. The brand logo, design and fonts used on a fraudulent web page may look obviously wrong or out-of-place, but some fake websites have a very professional design which closely mimics the original site, so use the tips above to determine whether a site is genuine or not.

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How to ensure that emails are really from PayPal:

-Check the greeting. We always address you by your first and last name, or the business name on your PayPal account

-See if the email asks for personal information. A PayPal email will never ask you for any of the following:

-Bank account numbers

-Debit and credit card numbers

-Driver's license number

-Email addresses

-Your full name

-Your password, or answers to your PayPal account security questions

-Check for attachments. We will never send an attachment or software updates to install on your computer.

Additionally, If you think you've received a fraudulent email, forward the email to spoof@paypal.com and then delete it from your mailbox.

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What is phishing?

'Phishing' is a form of web forgery designed to steal your identity, usually for financial gain.

It works by using false pretences to get you to disclose sensitive personal information, like credit and debit card numbers, account passwords, or bank account details.

One of the most common phishing scams involves sending a fraudulent email that appears to be from a trusted company or brand (i.e banks,Paypal etc.) This email then directs you to a fake version of a well-known website and records any information you enter, such as your password, financial details and more.

How does online fraud work?

Online fraud usually begins with someone sending millions of phishing emails disguised as messages from a trusted company or brand.

The typical phishing email will contain a story concocted to lure you into taking an action, such as clicking a link or button in the email (or less often, calling a phone number).

These links or buttons will take you to a fraudulent website which will also mimic the appearance of the well-known company's website. You will then be asked for personal information, like your bank details, credit card number, National Insurance number, or account password. So you think you're giving information to a trusted company when, in fact, you're sharing it with criminals.

Posted: Aug 20, 2010 at 10:50 Quote
This should be a sticky, it tells people things they need to know about Paypal Scams...contact http://marquis.pinkbike.com/ with a link to the thread and he should sticky this for you, I think it's a good call!! Smile

Posted: Aug 23, 2010 at 15:36 Quote
I'm gutted for you mate, really hope you get this resolved.
Any chance you can post screen shots of the "fake" e-mail from paypal so we know what to look out for?

Posted: Aug 23, 2010 at 18:49 Quote
Oh yeah. Thats a great idea! I'll get some screen shots and add them to the first post.

EDIT:

Added the screen shots of the emails to the first post. Click the photos to enlarge it so you can read it easier...

Also notice the scammer screwed up the copy right which I failed to notice (200Cool and the incorrect use of grammar and punctuation at some points.

Posted: Oct 16, 2010 at 18:03 Quote
yeah, e-mail phishers are something to watch out for.
It's so hard for anything to be 100% legit.

Posted: Oct 28, 2010 at 16:09 Quote
Sorry to hear about your losses. If whenever you receive a paypal email saying you've got funds etc, open your browser and type in the paypal address manually and login to check your account to see if there is any related transaction there, which should minimize the chances of getting scammed.

Posted: Nov 23, 2010 at 15:35 Quote
This guy is trying to buy a bike from me now, he was suspicious right off the bat claiming he was a petroleum engineer on an oil rig wanting to buy a bike for his cousin and that he does not have access to a phone, said he would have "picking up agent pick up bike". So I did some research and one way they scam you through Paypal is they set up shipping themselves so they have tracking info which would be your proof that you shipped the bike, they then claim after the transaction is complete that they never received the package, Paypal would ask the seller for proof of shipping which is a tracking number and signature showing delivery which they have and you do not, if you do not have that they automatically refund the buyer from your account and you are screwed! Apparently there are many cases of sellers having this happen so make sure you have proof it was shipped because Paypal doesn;t give a shit about sellers.

Posted: Dec 16, 2010 at 10:24 Quote
This is happening for lots of stuff, even things posted on craigslist. My parents were selling a travel trailer, and the same story. Never send anything until you actually have the money in your account that you can see, and don't ship anywhere but verified addresses. Let the buyer put a change of address form in with the post office and get it transferred.

Posted: Dec 16, 2010 at 10:41 Quote
GuvnerHutch wrote:
This guy is trying to buy a bike from me now, he was suspicious right off the bat claiming he was a petroleum engineer on an oil rig wanting to buy a bike for his cousin and that he does not have access to a phone, said he would have "picking up agent pick up bike". So I did some research and one way they scam you through Paypal is they set up shipping themselves so they have tracking info which would be your proof that you shipped the bike, they then claim after the transaction is complete that they never received the package, Paypal would ask the seller for proof of shipping which is a tracking number and signature showing delivery which they have and you do not, if you do not have that they automatically refund the buyer from your account and you are screwed! Apparently there are many cases of sellers having this happen so make sure you have proof it was shipped because Paypal doesn;t give a shit about sellers.

Another very similar has happened to me, i played along with it for a while. Very funny tho.

They wanted an item of mine, i told them the price, they agreed to use paypal. I recevied an e-mail from paypal (fake) saying the funds are ready to be transfered, but waiting. Then i received an e-mail saying there was an issue with the shipper and that i had to send 900$ (that is expensive for shipping) via western union before the 3000 (price of bike) would be transferred into my account. I sent a fake western union money order. The next e-mail i got was from paypal/FBI. i was ohhh so scared.

Posted: Dec 17, 2010 at 13:23 Quote
The wording used within the second e-mail also gives it away, not the best constructed sentances I have ever seen.

Posted: Jan 8, 2011 at 18:01 Quote
i sold a slk 350, 2 bikes and i had 7 or so e-mails wanting to purchase but to do it through paypal cause they are in a rush to buy, a gift for someone,overseas,on an oil rig...etc., etc.,this kind of "push" should send u a red flag....look for this kind of garbage, and by the way, i did not fall for this and actually reported a scam on pinkbike

Posted: Jan 12, 2011 at 19:41 Quote
Heh, well I just got an email from some guy wanting to buy my bike.

His wording was off, and he "...was glad to know the ad was in good condition..." He didn't refer to any specifics about the bike, but rather referenced it generically, making me thing he is just surfing classifieds. He says his deaf wife will be making payment, and she is pregnant. He wants my address, etc etc.

I think it sounds fishy, and based on reading the above, looks like I should take a pass.

Posted: Jan 12, 2011 at 19:52 Quote
knobzy wrote:
GuvnerHutch wrote:
This guy is trying to buy a bike from me now, he was suspicious right off the bat claiming he was a petroleum engineer on an oil rig wanting to buy a bike for his cousin and that he does not have access to a phone, said he would have "picking up agent pick up bike". So I did some research and one way they scam you through Paypal is they set up shipping themselves so they have tracking info which would be your proof that you shipped the bike, they then claim after the transaction is complete that they never received the package, Paypal would ask the seller for proof of shipping which is a tracking number and signature showing delivery which they have and you do not, if you do not have that they automatically refund the buyer from your account and you are screwed! Apparently there are many cases of sellers having this happen so make sure you have proof it was shipped because Paypal doesn;t give a shit about sellers.

Another very similar has happened to me, i played along with it for a while. Very funny tho.

They wanted an item of mine, i told them the price, they agreed to use paypal. I recevied an e-mail from paypal (fake) saying the funds are ready to be transfered, but waiting. Then i received an e-mail saying there was an issue with the shipper and that i had to send 900$ (that is expensive for shipping) via western union before the 3000 (price of bike) would be transferred into my account. I sent a fake western union money order. The next e-mail i got was from paypal/FBI. i was ohhh so scared.
what did the FBI one say

Posted: Jan 12, 2011 at 20:27 Quote
my business does hundreds of paypal transactions every year it is close to impossible to get scammed unless you are extremely careless

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