Aggresive Hardtails Post Em !

PB Forum :: Freeride & Slopestyle
Aggresive Hardtails Post Em !
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Posted: Sep 13, 2017 at 10:25 Quote
Wades bike is so Bitchin! That is the dude I hit up when I have frame building questions as he lives a few blocks away. Such a rad dude. That bike had 410 chainstays to start. He said it rode funny and cut and made them a bit longer. haha

Posted: Sep 13, 2017 at 11:05 Quote
favis wrote:
Let me see if I can explain myself better if there is a triangle and the acute angles are the race and axle instead of using both the legs of the triangle to achieve the desired offset use the hypotenuse with the direction of travel at an angle to the steering axis

You mean keep the same offset, but angle everything at the crown. Like an odyssey director:

One potential problem (feature?) of this solution is the offset will change as the fork goes through its travel.

It's also possible to keep the same offset, but do it by shifting the crown(s) forward like a zzyzx:

Posted: Sep 13, 2017 at 23:49 Quote
SirChomps-a-Lot wrote:
favis wrote:
Let me see if I can explain myself better if there is a triangle and the acute angles are the race and axle instead of using both the legs of the triangle to achieve the desired offset use the hypotenuse with the direction of travel at an angle to the steering axis

You mean keep the same offset, but angle everything at the crown. Like an odyssey director:

One potential problem (feature?) of this solution is the offset will change as the fork goes through its travel.
The director fork is exactly what I meant I didn't think about the offset changing through the travel though

It's also possible to keep the same offset, but do it by shifting the crown(s) forward like a zzyzx:

Posted: Sep 14, 2017 at 11:08 Quote
ggpoww wrote:

Very nice. m7000 is so hot right now. I'm rebuilding my stylus with m7000 as well.

Posted: Sep 14, 2017 at 11:14 Quote
SirChomps-a-Lot wrote:
ggpoww wrote:

Very nice. m7000 is so hot right now. I'm rebuilding my stylus with m7000 as well.

Thanks! You'll love it, hard to beat for the $

Posted: Sep 14, 2017 at 12:39 Quote
I am interested in taking the next step to a harcore AM HT. I'm considering a On One 45650b, Dee Dar, Kona Cinder Cone, and a Trek Roscoe 8. I ride mostly single track and occasional downhill slopestyle.

Which of those, ( or any other) would you guys recommend?

Posted: Sep 14, 2017 at 12:51 Quote
Primo123 wrote:
I am interested in taking the next step to a harcore AM HT. I'm considering a On One 45650b, Dee Dar, Kona Cinder Cone, and a Trek Roscoe 8. I ride mostly single track and occasional downhill slopestyle.

Which of those, ( or any other) would you guys recommend?
I would look at some of the Brittish hardtail bikes like Ragley Blue-pig or Mmmbop, Stanton Switchback, Orange P7, Cotic BFe, Vitus Sentier, BTR Ranger or maybe some hardtail from Bird or Whyte!

Posted: Sep 14, 2017 at 17:57 Quote
tobgren wrote:
Primo123 wrote:
I am interested in taking the next step to a harcore AM HT. I'm considering a On One 45650b, Dee Dar, Kona Cinder Cone, and a Trek Roscoe 8. I ride mostly single track and occasional downhill slopestyle.

Which of those, ( or any other) would you guys recommend?
I would look at some of the Brittish hardtail bikes like Ragley Blue-pig or Mmmbop, Stanton Switchback, Orange P7, Cotic BFe, Vitus Sentier, BTR Ranger or maybe some hardtail from Bird or Whyte!
I love my blue pig but the standover is very high. Consider something else if you have short legs.

Posted: Sep 14, 2017 at 23:31 Quote
Primo123 wrote:
I am interested in taking the next step to a harcore AM HT. I'm considering a On One 45650b, Dee Dar, Kona Cinder Cone, and a Trek Roscoe 8. I ride mostly single track and occasional downhill slopestyle.

Which of those, ( or any other) would you guys recommend?

Can I ask, why those in particular? Is it availability or budget?

Posted: Sep 15, 2017 at 8:32 Quote
Quick question for those who are riding "new geometry" aggro hardtail : How do they behave in overall riding, like uphill and flat sections?

I ask because I'd weld myself a new frame this winter and trails around here are really a good mix of all. I use to be a xc racer and while I'm not interrested in setting uphills records, I still enjoy going up at a good pace, well sometimes!

Bike will be runing a 140-160 fork (Mattoc or yari) probably 27.5x3 and/or 29x2.4.

Thanks!

Posted: Sep 15, 2017 at 8:40 Quote
Long reach and steep seat angles are great for uphills too. Naturally it's harder on tight and twisty bits but you get a much better seating position.

On flat sections with lots of corners you'll need to run a dropper post to get good maneuverability. The steep seat angle takes space away for you hip to move around while standing.

Posted: Sep 15, 2017 at 8:49 Quote
ggpoww wrote:
SirChomps-a-Lot wrote:
ggpoww wrote:

Very nice. m7000 is so hot right now. I'm rebuilding my stylus with m7000 as well.

Thanks! You'll love it, hard to beat for the $

Hey, have you ridden it much? Any dropped chains? I'm thinking I probably don't need a chain device but good to hear some opinions.

One of the reasons I'm stoked on m7000 is the long-wearing steel chainring teeth.

Posted: Sep 15, 2017 at 9:20 Quote
pyromaniac wrote:
Long reach and steep seat angles are great for uphills too. Naturally it's harder on tight and twisty bits but you get a much better seating position.

On flat sections with lots of corners you'll need to run a dropper post to get good maneuverability. The steep seat angle takes space away for you hip to move around while standing.
Just wondering what is considered a steep seat angle? I consider my switchbacks, both the long one and regular a bit harder to climb on in general over old school xc geo and not as snappy to get back up to speed coming out of squared corners on flattish stuff but all that is a fair trade off for the performance and fun factor on descents.Any time I hop on an xc bike now it feels really twitchy at first.

Posted: Sep 15, 2017 at 9:21 Quote
75 and above is steep, 73 and below is slack


 
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