[Post Your Projects] Road, & Fixed Gear

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[Post Your Projects] Road, & Fixed Gear
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Posted: Apr 14, 2018 at 12:59 Quote
Kop5 wrote:
That's the frame. I can take some closeups of the funky pattern stuff (I don't even know what to describe it as) on the tubing tomorrow
My hipstersled

I own the nearly identical frame but without so radical a headtube angle. I've posted pictures of it when I first got It and will post the finished product once the restoration is complete. Fun to own a cool and very rare bike.
They were all manufactured in Mississauga. Cheers.

Posted: Apr 21, 2018 at 0:58 Quote
ktm87 wrote:
this is a old 70s schwinn Le Tour frame i had laying around. i wanted a road bike so i figured id make it work.
Im a machinist so i machined down the head tube a little and the headset cups a little to make the bike fit a 1 1/8 threadless fork. currently machining new rear dropouts and disc tabs. also need to get QR cups to get my matching front wheel on.

Interesting, how much did you take off the cups and HT?

Posted: Apr 27, 2018 at 18:24 Quote
I have a 2018-2019 winter project bike lined up but cannot find any info on this old steely. Perhaps someone had seen this bicycle before.

Posted: May 10, 2018 at 7:11 Quote


Budget friendly build using parts I had laying around.

Posted: May 31, 2018 at 12:25 Quote
I dig it. Looks rad. The turquoise fork and brown go quite nice together. What saddle is that?

Currently uploading some pictures of the GT Tachyon I built up for my girlfriend.


Posted: May 31, 2018 at 14:28 Quote
Overall I am really pleased with how this build turned out. Stylistically, the white and brown aren't really my thing, I would have preferred to keep the look more in keeping with the early 90's ' a e s t h e t i c ', but this is what my girlfriend wanted, and objectively, I think it looks pretty good.

Some thoughts, based on a brief trail ride at Kelso, and around town:

This thing really does ride nicely. So smooth. The WTB tires roll great at low PSI, even with tubes in them. Great on and offload, as long as you stay out of the mud. This tire's popularity makes total sense- it's just so excellent overall. The slender fork, 1" steerer, and steel quill stem pretty much kill all road buzz, and smooth out even chunky stones and sharp roots. This is definitely as compliant as it gets without suspension, gizmo stems and posts, etc.

I was somewhat worried about the the Ritchey VenterMax bars (Comp) when they arrived, as they looked comically wide, and the ergo bump felt all wrong. Once they were wrapped up however, the bump felt great in the hand. These bars require the lever reach-adjustment to be brought in as close as possible. You've gotta, to get the ramp/hood transition right, and actually be able to grab the lever from the drops. I would say they definitely favour riders with larger hands. Once you get going, they offer an impressive amount of control. I was easily able to hustle the bike around berms and over dips and jumps, and I have never really ridden a drop-bar bike offload. The slight back sweep on the tops is nice, and despite their wackiness, they still feel like a road bar.

The Shimano 1x11 SLX/105 drivetrain with Tanpan performs excellently for the cost. Shifts are smooth and crisp on the XT 11-46 cassette, and the clutch keeps everything secure and silent. Back pedalling will drop the chain down from the largest cog, I suspect this is a result of the short chain stays, and not quite perfect chainline. I went with a 110mm BB, so I could run the narrowest setup with the chainring on the outside of the crank spider, but if I were to do it again, I would run in on the inside, and select a slightly wider BB. In actual riding, it's not noticeable at all, and I see no need to swap for the time being.

I definitely underestimated how well this thing would roll- The 40T chainring will probably have to be swapped to at least 44T in the future, as it is not difficult to spin this thing out on the road- Granted I haven't tried it with foot retention.

Cantilever brakes suck. I spent a lot of time trying to dial in the feel, and maximize the power, but it's still not really what we'd hoped for. To be fair, I am using relatively soft squeal-free pads that squirm a bit, and un-machined rims don't help. At the end of the day though, disc brakes have taken over for a reason, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Setup alone makes them worth it, I would rather bleed a hydro system then mess with post mount pads again.

Brooks saddles are really comfortable, even during the break-in period. My girlfriend loves it.

The Velo Orange rims are 17mm internal width, and I spent a lot of time worrying that they might not be wide enough for the rubber. We will see what happens with real MTB tires, but I don't see there being a problem. The only wider option that will take rim brakes is the Velocity Cliffhanger, and they are really just too heavy and expensive to make any sense.

I have yet to put the bike on a scale, but it came out feeling lighter than expected, especially considering that weight was not high on the component-spec priority list. That's not to say it's light- It's just no worse for what it is than say, a Specialized Sequoia, or other steel all-road bike. A keen builder could shave a couple of pounds off this build easily- Bars, stem, saddle, post, cassette etc could all be a lot lighter. However, I think a healthy balance was struck. This build came to about $1600 cad, which I feel is very reasonable for how good it feels.



Ritchey Venturemax Comp


Posted: May 31, 2018 at 20:32 Quote
Wow, that thing looks great! I was surprised by the choice of paint initially, but I think it's actually quite nice. Excellent fusion of vintage/retro and modern.

Posted: Jun 8, 2018 at 6:51 Quote
alreadyupsidedown wrote:
I dig it. Looks rad. The turquoise fork and brown go quite nice together. What saddle is that?

Currently uploading some pictures of the GT Tachyon I built up for my girlfriend.

Selle Anatomica NSX

Posted: Jun 8, 2018 at 7:05 Quote
I have that bar on my gravel bike and like it alot!
alreadyupsidedown wrote:
Overall I am really pleased with how this build turned out. Stylistically, the white and brown aren't really my thing, I would have preferred to keep the look more in keeping with the early 90's ' a e s t h e t i c ', but this is what my girlfriend wanted, and objectively, I think it looks pretty good.

Some thoughts, based on a brief trail ride at Kelso, and around town:

This thing really does ride nicely. So smooth. The WTB tires roll great at low PSI, even with tubes in them. Great on and offload, as long as you stay out of the mud. This tire's popularity makes total sense- it's just so excellent overall. The slender fork, 1" steerer, and steel quill stem pretty much kill all road buzz, and smooth out even chunky stones and sharp roots. This is definitely as compliant as it gets without suspension, gizmo stems and posts, etc.

I was somewhat worried about the the Ritchey VenterMax bars (Comp) when they arrived, as they looked comically wide, and the ergo bump felt all wrong. Once they were wrapped up however, the bump felt great in the hand. These bars require the lever reach-adjustment to be brought in as close as possible. You've gotta, to get the ramp/hood transition right, and actually be able to grab the lever from the drops. I would say they definitely favour riders with larger hands. Once you get going, they offer an impressive amount of control. I was easily able to hustle the bike around berms and over dips and jumps, and I have never really ridden a drop-bar bike offload. The slight back sweep on the tops is nice, and despite their wackiness, they still feel like a road bar.

The Shimano 1x11 SLX/105 drivetrain with Tanpan performs excellently for the cost. Shifts are smooth and crisp on the XT 11-46 cassette, and the clutch keeps everything secure and silent. Back pedalling will drop the chain down from the largest cog, I suspect this is a result of the short chain stays, and not quite perfect chainline. I went with a 110mm BB, so I could run the narrowest setup with the chainring on the outside of the crank spider, but if I were to do it again, I would run in on the inside, and select a slightly wider BB. In actual riding, it's not noticeable at all, and I see no need to swap for the time being.

I definitely underestimated how well this thing would roll- The 40T chainring will probably have to be swapped to at least 44T in the future, as it is not difficult to spin this thing out on the road- Granted I haven't tried it with foot retention.

Cantilever brakes suck. I spent a lot of time trying to dial in the feel, and maximize the power, but it's still not really what we'd hoped for. To be fair, I am using relatively soft squeal-free pads that squirm a bit, and un-machined rims don't help. At the end of the day though, disc brakes have taken over for a reason, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Setup alone makes them worth it, I would rather bleed a hydro system then mess with post mount pads again.

Brooks saddles are really comfortable, even during the break-in period. My girlfriend loves it.

The Velo Orange rims are 17mm internal width, and I spent a lot of time worrying that they might not be wide enough for the rubber. We will see what happens with real MTB tires, but I don't see there being a problem. The only wider option that will take rim brakes is the Velocity Cliffhanger, and they are really just too heavy and expensive to make any sense.

I have yet to put the bike on a scale, but it came out feeling lighter than expected, especially considering that weight was not high on the component-spec priority list. That's not to say it's light- It's just no worse for what it is than say, a Specialized Sequoia, or other steel all-road bike. A keen builder could shave a couple of pounds off this build easily- Bars, stem, saddle, post, cassette etc could all be a lot lighter. However, I think a healthy balance was struck. This build came to about $1600 cad, which I feel is very reasonable for how good it feels.



Ritchey Venturemax Comp


Posted: Jun 8, 2018 at 12:55 Quote
Current coolfiber sleds, sorry for the bad quality, linked from instagram.
The S5 finally got its OSPW's and the Tarmac got a bit more beaten up since last time posted.. Rolleyes
If anyone else got a spare sworks tarmac i can recommend this setup, it beats everything!

Posted: Aug 16, 2018 at 9:02 Quote
singlespeedtoday wrote:
Wow, that thing looks great! I was surprised by the choice of paint initially, but I think it's actually quite nice. Excellent fusion of vintage/retro and modern.

Thanks for the kind words, it was a bit of a guess trying to figure out what would look good. If I did it again, Id do a few more parts in black like the headset, stem and post, but I think it's good. Those black cranks just look so clean.

The paint is temporary, as we were having trouble finding a nice pearl metallic off white in a sturdy enamel. But it will happen eventually, as this is just acrylic lacquer and it's already chipping. The flat white does give it that trendy Specialized Sequoia feel.

Only issues we've run into so far: You've really gotta be careful to avoid tweaking the alignment of the slender steel derailleur hanger when loading and packing the bike. The big long mech can exert a lot or torque when bumped, and even a slight bend can make it hard to get the trim right across the wide range cassette.

Also Cantis still suck. I think I need to get some different pads. It's way too easy to outride the brakes on this thing, the frame geometry is capable of so much more than they can handle.

Posted: Aug 16, 2018 at 9:11 Quote
StumpyJR wrote:
I have that bar on my gravel bike and like it alot!

Yeah it's pretty cool. So much control. It's weird but you just gotta have faith.

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