Road Bike Info & Discussion -*ASK ROAD QUESTIONS HERE*-

PB Forum :: Road Cycling and Touring
Road Bike Info & Discussion -*ASK ROAD QUESTIONS HERE*-
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Posted: Apr 4, 2019 at 21:40 Quote
The Dew is your least sexy and most efficient commuting option (of the ones you listed).

VPentagon wrote:
How much does frame design/sizing affect cycling efficiency? I am looking at the 2019' Kona Dew Plus 52CM or 2010 'Kona Lava dome 26 or 2013' Chromag Stylus for communting around the city of Vancouver.

Not sure if i want to have a rigid fork or suspension fork since i do go on the sidewalk if there is space to feel safer instead of being on the road making my jumps off curbs a little easier

Posted: Apr 5, 2019 at 18:05 Quote
VPentagon wrote:
How much does frame design/sizing affect cycling efficiency? I am looking at the 2019' Kona Dew Plus 52CM or 2010 'Kona Lava dome 26 or 2013' Chromag Stylus for communting around the city of Vancouver.

Not sure if i want to have a rigid fork or suspension fork since i do go on the sidewalk if there is space to feel safer instead of being on the road making my jumps off curbs a little easier

Sure, all those bikes can be setup for efficient pedaling, as long as they have the right reach for your torso, and you can get the saddle high enough. Theres nothing stopping you from putting some slicks on the MTBs. Efficiency differences at that point will be relatively negligible, as they're all riser bar bikes, and you'll get around fine. The MTBs will just be a little heavier.

I assume you mention this obscure mix of bikes because you already own/have access to the Stylus and Lava Dome, but are considering the Dew? If that's the case, I say you put a set of slicks on the Lava Dome and use that. Try it out at least. Lots of people commute on XC mountain bikes with road style tires. I personally wouldn't commute on the Stylus, as it might require more component changes to get a good fit. It's also visibly a nicer MTB, and a potential theft magnet. But If it's all you've got, it can be made to do the job. Definitely not recommended though.

~HOWEVER~ If this is a choice between buying any of them, get the Dew. The 47mm WTB Horizen tires roll great, and you can run them fairly soft so they'll absorb the road vibration. As for hopping curbs? You don't need suspension for that. I've jumped stair sets on fixed gear bikes with 28c tires. The Dew will handle it fine.

Posted: Apr 6, 2019 at 0:01 Quote
wrote:
wrote:
badbadleroybrown wrote:
1. Don't go on the sidewalk, ever... it's a sideWALK, it's not meant for bikes and you just make us look like a*sholes and perpetuate the whole "road is meant for cars only" bullshit.

2. Sizing is EVERYTHING on a road bike. If it doesn't fit, you'll never be particularly efficient and likely won't enjoy riding.

I should of been more clear on what I meant on going on sidewalks, but I always take side streets and never main roads. I don't ride on sidewalks as if i own it anyways. I always give people walking the lane or room if i am or pull off to the side behind objects and wait as they pass by so i'm not in the way if i do though.

smike wrote:
The Dew is your least sexy and most efficient commuting option (of the ones you listed).

Yeah.. I had a feeling that was going to be the most efficient, but just wanted to be sure haha.

alreadyupsidedown wrote:
Sure, all those bikes can be setup for efficient pedaling, as long as they have the right reach for your torso, and you can get the saddle high enough. Theres nothing stopping you from putting some slicks on the MTBs. Efficiency differences at that point will be relatively negligible, as they're all riser bar bikes, and you'll get around fine. The MTBs will just be a little heavier.

I assume you mention this obscure mix of bikes because you already own/have access to the Stylus and Lava Dome, but are considering the Dew? If that's the case, I say you put a set of slicks on the Lava Dome and use that. Try it out at least. Lots of people commute on XC mountain bikes with road style tires. I personally wouldn't commute on the Stylus, as it might require more component changes to get a good fit. It's also visibly a nicer MTB, and a potential theft magnet. But If it's all you've got, it can be made to do the job. Definitely not recommended though.

~HOWEVER~ If this is a choice between buying any of them, get the Dew. The 47mm WTB Horizen tires roll great, and you can run them fairly soft so they'll absorb the road vibration. As for hopping curbs? You don't need suspension for that. I've jumped stair sets on fixed gear bikes with 28c tires. The Dew will handle it fine.

I normally ride Medium sized frames on dual suspension bikes. Never had a hardtail or a " pedaling efficient " bike before. I don't own any of the bikes i've mentioned but those are ones that catch my interest locally to me. I will be for sure running slicks. The Stylus and Lava dome is what " I think " will suit me and my wants but who knows until i try it like you said, but yeah the Stylus is a nicer looking bike and definitely don't want to worry it being stolen since i just want to use it purely as a communting bike. I'm 5'11 and 19' Inch frame seems like a good size for me if i get a bike like the Dew

I really like the Dew though. It is a pretty nice bike too, but going back to the Stylus as being to nice of a bike to be riding around especially the Dew being so new too so it'll be hard not to catch peoples attention especially in the green pastelly color. Maybe i'll grab some plasti dip paint or wrap the bike in some tape to make it " look " crappy haha if i do get the Dew. It'll be hard to find a fine line of a bike that rides good but doesn't look nice at the same time or maybe i'm just over thinking it. Being able to run disc brakes is a must though haha. Maybe i'll do some more searching on Craigslist or fb marketplace and see what i can find.

Thank you very much for those that have replied though!

Posted: Apr 6, 2019 at 15:06 Quote
wrote:
wrote:
The Chromag is way too slack for the road. It's gonna feel sluggish. It's also designed around a 160 fork, which is overkill for commuting, to put it lightly. The lava dome is not terrible, but as I said earlier, the Dew is the only one that was actually meant for (mostly) pavement, so it'll feel the best.

VPentagon wrote:
badbadleroybrown wrote:
1. Don't go on the sidewalk, ever... it's a sideWALK, it's not meant for bikes and you just make us look like a*sholes and perpetuate the whole "road is meant for cars only" bullshit.

2. Sizing is EVERYTHING on a road bike. If it doesn't fit, you'll never be particularly efficient and likely won't enjoy riding.

I should of been more clear on what I meant on going on sidewalks, but I always take side streets and never main roads. I don't ride on sidewalks as if i own it anyways. I always give people walking the lane or room if i am or pull off to the side behind objects and wait as they pass by so i'm not in the way if i do though.

smike wrote:
The Dew is your least sexy and most efficient commuting option (of the ones you listed).

Yeah.. I had a feeling that was going to be the most efficient, but just wanted to be sure haha.

alreadyupsidedown wrote:
Sure, all those bikes can be setup for efficient pedaling, as long as they have the right reach for your torso, and you can get the saddle high enough. Theres nothing stopping you from putting some slicks on the MTBs. Efficiency differences at that point will be relatively negligible, as they're all riser bar bikes, and you'll get around fine. The MTBs will just be a little heavier.

I assume you mention this obscure mix of bikes because you already own/have access to the Stylus and Lava Dome, but are considering the Dew? If that's the case, I say you put a set of slicks on the Lava Dome and use that. Try it out at least. Lots of people commute on XC mountain bikes with road style tires. I personally wouldn't commute on the Stylus, as it might require more component changes to get a good fit. It's also visibly a nicer MTB, and a potential theft magnet. But If it's all you've got, it can be made to do the job. Definitely not recommended though.

~HOWEVER~ If this is a choice between buying any of them, get the Dew. The 47mm WTB Horizen tires roll great, and you can run them fairly soft so they'll absorb the road vibration. As for hopping curbs? You don't need suspension for that. I've jumped stair sets on fixed gear bikes with 28c tires. The Dew will handle it fine.

I normally ride Medium sized frames on dual suspension bikes. Never had a hardtail or a " pedaling efficient " bike before. I don't own any of the bikes i've mentioned but those are ones that catch my interest locally to me. I will be for sure running slicks. The Stylus and Lava dome is what " I think " will suit me and my wants but who knows until i try it like you said, but yeah the Stylus is a nicer looking bike and definitely don't want to worry it being stolen since i just want to use it purely as a communting bike. I'm 5'11 and 19' Inch frame seems like a good size for me if i get a bike like the Dew

I really like the Dew though. It is a pretty nice bike too, but going back to the Stylus as being to nice of a bike to be riding around especially the Dew being so new too so it'll be hard not to catch peoples attention especially in the green pastelly color. Maybe i'll grab some plasti dip paint or wrap the bike in some tape to make it " look " crappy haha if i do get the Dew. It'll be hard to find a fine line of a bike that rides good but doesn't look nice at the same time or maybe i'm just over thinking it. Being able to run disc brakes is a must though haha. Maybe i'll do some more searching on Craigslist or fb marketplace and see what i can find.

Thank you very much for those that have replied though!

The Chromag is way too slack for the road. It's gonna feel sluggish. It's also designed around a 160 fork, which is overkill for commuting, to put it lightly. The lava dome is not terrible, but as I said earlier, the Dew is the only one that was actually meant for (mostly) pavement, so it'll feel the best.

Posted: Apr 7, 2019 at 13:37 Quote
Looks like the Dew Plus comes in black as well, which might help solve that problem.

Do you have a safe place to lock it?

Posted: Jul 31, 2019 at 18:18 Quote
Hey everyone, I'm looking to get a road bike to train during the winter months. I'm leaning towards a Wahoo Kickr as I would like to ride outside as well. My budget is in the 1-2k range. Is the Canyon Endurance line a good fit for me?

Posted: Jul 31, 2019 at 18:50 Quote
Canyon are great bikes... but I'd strongly recommend not blowing $1200 on a trainer when your bike budget is only $2000.

Get a Kickr Snap and expand your bike budget to $2700. Or expand your bike budget to $2500 and get some solid bibs for $200... or keep your bike budget at $2000 and get some nice shoes, bibs, jerrsey, and helmet for $700.

Posted: Jul 31, 2019 at 20:00 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
Canyon are great bikes... but I'd strongly recommend not blowing $1200 on a trainer when your bike budget is only $2000.

Get a Kickr Snap and expand your bike budget to $2700. Or expand your bike budget to $2500 and get some solid bibs for $200... or keep your bike budget at $2000 and get some nice shoes, bibs, jerrsey, and helmet for $700.

Are you including the trainer in that budget? Sorry if it wasn't clear but I meant around $2000 on the bike alone.

Posted: Jul 31, 2019 at 20:36 Quote
Habaden wrote:
badbadleroybrown wrote:
Canyon are great bikes... but I'd strongly recommend not blowing $1200 on a trainer when your bike budget is only $2000.

Get a Kickr Snap and expand your bike budget to $2700. Or expand your bike budget to $2500 and get some solid bibs for $200... or keep your bike budget at $2000 and get some nice shoes, bibs, jerrsey, and helmet for $700.

Are you including the trainer in that budget? Sorry if it wasn't clear but I meant around $2000 on the bike alone.
The wahoo kickr is a $1200 trainer... it's silly to buy a $2000 bike and a $1200 trainer.

So, you're looking at spending $3200 total between bike and trainer. Get a Wahoo Snap for $500 and that leaves you enough to get something like the Canyon Endurace CF SL Disc 8.0 with the remaining $2700... solid DT wheelset, full Ultegra group, Conti GP4K tires... super solid build that'll serve you well for a long time and perform much better than what you'll get for sub $2k.

Trainer rides suck, they don't suck any more or less on a $1200 direct drive trainer and the only real advantage to those trainers is protecting carbon rims. I have a CycleOps H2 and it ads nothing over a typical wheel on roller type smart trainer. Put your money into the bike, not the trainer.

Posted: Aug 2, 2019 at 10:32 Quote
Anyone have much experience with the Trek Crossrip? A local guy is selling frame/fork for $100 and was thinking of building up a commuter/gravel bike. I've been looking at single speeds/fixies for a while as it doesn't make much sense to ride around the city on my trail bike and then this came up. Would definitely be nice to have something with a bit more tire clearance.

Posted: Aug 3, 2019 at 10:57 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
Habaden wrote:
badbadleroybrown wrote:
Canyon are great bikes... but I'd strongly recommend not blowing $1200 on a trainer when your bike budget is only $2000.

Get a Kickr Snap and expand your bike budget to $2700. Or expand your bike budget to $2500 and get some solid bibs for $200... or keep your bike budget at $2000 and get some nice shoes, bibs, jerrsey, and helmet for $700.

Are you including the trainer in that budget? Sorry if it wasn't clear but I meant around $2000 on the bike alone.
The wahoo kickr is a $1200 trainer... it's silly to buy a $2000 bike and a $1200 trainer.

So, you're looking at spending $3200 total between bike and trainer. Get a Wahoo Snap for $500 and that leaves you enough to get something like the Canyon Endurace CF SL Disc 8.0 with the remaining $2700... solid DT wheelset, full Ultegra group, Conti GP4K tires... super solid build that'll serve you well for a long time and perform much better than what you'll get for sub $2k.

Trainer rides suck, they don't suck any more or less on a $1200 direct drive trainer and the only real advantage to those trainers is protecting carbon rims. I have a CycleOps H2 and it ads nothing over a typical wheel on roller type smart trainer. Put your money into the bike, not the trainer.
Or just be a man and buy rollers.

Posted: Aug 3, 2019 at 10:59 Quote
Smart trainers and rollers aren't even comparable products though. Rollers are rad for learning a smooth stroke but they're not gonna give you variable resistance and definitely not gonna give you interactive adjustable em resistance from an app.

Be a real man and buy both!!! lol

Posted: Aug 3, 2019 at 12:49 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
Smart trainers and rollers aren't even comparable products though. Rollers are rad for learning a smooth stroke but they're not gonna give you variable resistance and definitely not gonna give you interactive adjustable em resistance from an app.

Be a real man and buy both!!! lol
Fair I guess, I've only ever used trainers to smooth out my pedal stroke.

Posted: Aug 3, 2019 at 12:52 Quote
Smart trainers will give you a killer workout, especially if you can stomach riding one for extended periods. I have a buddy that can do two hour zwift sessions but I get bored out of my mind after about 45 minutes max. Really pretty cool tech compared to old school fluid trainers.

Posted: Aug 12, 2019 at 9:56 Quote
Looking for help with a compatibility issue... I have a commuter bike setup 3x9 (42/32/24t) with Shimano Sora STI levers. Currently a Deore front mech is installed, which has a different pull ratio than the levers. Anyone know of a top pull 3x9 front derailleur that exists to solve my problem? I am aware of converters like Jtek, etc., and I'm trying to avoid that.


 
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