Sexiest AM/enduro bike thread. Don't post your bike. Rules on first page.

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Sexiest AM/enduro bike thread. Don't post your bike. Rules on first page.
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Posted: Sep 16, 2019 at 16:32 Quote
Having broken carbon and aluminum frames... I have no idea. Depends on the manufacturer and the warranty/crash replacement. I guess whichever one had a cooler paint job? Only partially kidding haha.

Posted: Sep 16, 2019 at 16:39 Quote
Thanks, all, for the interesting feedback - and please keep it coming!

mtbman1980 wrote:
We have been told it is so expensive to produce molds etc that carbon should be more expensive.

This makes resale of premium aluminum bikes difficult compared to carbon.

Those may be two separate issues.

1. Expensive molds = expensive bikes.

Even if it's true, it's not your problem; it's the manufacturer's problem! Consumers' goals are simply to have a bike that's better - stronger, stiffer, lighter, aesthetically pleasing, more features, etc. It's up to manufacturers to meet those goals as efficiently as possible. If a more expensive process resulted in an otherwise identical product, there would be no justification to the consumer for a higher cost.


2. Resale

That's true and has multiple factors:

• The perceived discount of a used bike is based on the initial price, whether that was justified or not.
• If a material produces a better product, then it's reasonable the used price would be higher.
• If a material is more durable or repairable, that enhances the used value.

Posted: Sep 16, 2019 at 19:24 Quote
Ohh I get it and I’m sure most in here do but to the average rider you are fighting the marketing hype from the big companies and right now at least that is aluminum is inferior to carbon.

Posted: Sep 16, 2019 at 21:27 Quote
Material is pretty low on my criteria, honestly.

Ease of repair, warranty, and potential versatility of the frame are big factors, as is price, weight and to a certain extent how easy the company to deal with. Obviously geo is important, but there are lots of bikes with good geo these days.

Guerrilla Gravity’s modular frame was a big selling point to me. The ability to run it as a short travel bike today and a long travel enduro bike tomorrow is pretty rad.

Posted: Sep 17, 2019 at 21:31 Quote
PHeller wrote:
Guerrilla Gravity’s modular frame was a big selling point to me. The ability to run it as a short travel bike today and a long travel enduro bike tomorrow is pretty rad.

Do you actually reconfigure your bikes? It seems many people like the idea of adjustable geometry, multiple wheel sizes, etc., but I've met only a couple who have actually used such features.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 8:27 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
PHeller wrote:
Guerrilla Gravity’s modular frame was a big selling point to me. The ability to run it as a short travel bike today and a long travel enduro bike tomorrow is pretty rad.

Do you actually reconfigure your bikes? It seems many people like the idea of adjustable geometry, multiple wheel sizes, etc., but I've met only a couple who have actually used such features.

The GG is more configurable than just flipping a chip between high/low though. Sure there's additional investment involved, but the idea of being able to re-configure the GG from a short travel - long travel or vice versa could add longevity to the bike. For example if you bought the bike to ride gnarly tech terrain where you live, but next year you had to move for work and now the local trails are all flow...well you don't necessarily need to buy a new bike!

That being said I agree that most people won't ever be re configuring their bike from day to day depending on which trail they are going to ride. Hell, I can rarely be bothered to adjust tire pressure LOL.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 11:23 Quote
drake88 wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
PHeller wrote:
Guerrilla Gravity’s modular frame was a big selling point to me. The ability to run it as a short travel bike today and a long travel enduro bike tomorrow is pretty rad.

Do you actually reconfigure your bikes? It seems many people like the idea of adjustable geometry, multiple wheel sizes, etc., but I've met only a couple who have actually used such features.

The GG is more configurable than just flipping a chip between high/low though. Sure there's additional investment involved, but the idea of being able to re-configure the GG from a short travel - long travel or vice versa could add longevity to the bike. For example if you bought the bike to ride gnarly tech terrain where you live, but next year you had to move for work and now the local trails are all flow...well you don't necessarily need to buy a new bike!

That being said I agree that most people won't ever be re configuring their bike from day to day depending on which trail they are going to ride. Hell, I can rarely be bothered to adjust tire pressure LOL.

That's what I'm getting at:

1. Do the presence and extent of a frame's configuration options increase sales?
2. Among those who have purchased frames with such options, how many use these options and to what extent?

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 12:01 Quote
I had 2017 Slayer with ride 4 adjustment. In the spring I’d make her a little steeper. For park season I'd put her in the slackest position. Once the park closed, back to the steeper setting for pedalling around. Realistically I only moved the adjustment twice a year. Definitely not worth paying more for but if it’s there might as well use it.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 13:42 Quote
I set my Knolly to the slackest setting and haven't gone back but if I lived somewhere with mellower terrain I might put it in the steeper setting....or buy a different bike.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 14:15 Quote
Fixed geometry Patrol with no bother.

I like the idea of the flexibility on the TR250 when I had it (travel/head angle + chainstay) but after faffing a few times when I first got it, I proceeded to not touch anything after about 2 months until it cracked and got replaced.

I'm either not good enough, not sensitive enough to changes or, most likely, too damn lazy to try and optimise things. I barely even adjust tyre pressure for conditions because I just want to get on with riding, rather than be constantly fiddling trail side.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 14:46 Quote
secondtimeuser wrote:
Fixed geometry Patrol with no bother.

I like the idea of the flexibility on the TR250 when I had it (travel/head angle + chainstay) but after faffing a few times when I first got it, I proceeded to not touch anything after about 2 months until it cracked and got replaced.

I'm either not good enough, not sensitive enough to changes or, most likely, too damn lazy to try and optimise things. I barely even adjust tyre pressure for conditions because I just want to get on with riding, rather than be constantly fiddling trail side.

Edit

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 16:29 Quote
On my Remedy I ran it slack and never even tried steep.. On my Megatower I've only ran it slack and short chain stay setting. Pretty confident that's likely where it will stay too.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 16:31 Quote
It seems nearly everyone runs their adjustable geometry in the low & slack positions, raising the question of whether ideal geometry is considerably lower and / or slacker than typical geometry.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 19:35 Quote
In my case with GGs “options” while Im not rushing out to buy all the seatstay kits for 4 different bikes, its the fact that I have those options that made a big difference in my considering them, well that and the whole made in USA thing.

Posted: Sep 18, 2019 at 20:12 Quote
I wonder how many people even change things and just leave them in the same spot as when they picked it up from the shop


 
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