Sexiest AM/enduro bike thread. Don't post your bike. Rules on first page.

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Sexiest AM/enduro bike thread. Don't post your bike. Rules on first page.
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Posted: Oct 8, 2019 at 19:45 Quote
Soupherb wrote:
Enduro43 wrote:

Nice build

Who won the bike?

Posted: Oct 8, 2019 at 20:49 Quote
PHeller wrote:
is that Focus Sam 9.9 a 29er or 275? I can't friggin tell.

it's 275

Posted: Oct 8, 2019 at 20:50 Quote
Probably more around 33-34.

PHeller wrote:
Rad. Even with coil its probably still well under 30lbs, no?

Posted: Oct 8, 2019 at 23:10 Quote
diego-b wrote:
Nobble wrote:
MrMiyagi wrote:


Yeah right Big Grin . Like anybody would notice that.
A lot of people would.

A lot of people also notice the negative effect clutch derailleurs have on suspension performance.
Those people are full of it.

Try riding same trail back to back and you'll definitely notice how much the clutch effects suspension.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 13:31 Quote
Is the clutch drag not just extra LSC though? I have found that stiction and LSC sorta go hand in hand, like they feel really similar and sorta do the same thing.

From a guy that has been forced to run chainless a couple times because my chain broke at a bike park, I did notice the extra smoothness, but mostly noticed how quiet my bike was.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 14:55 Quote
The amount that you feel how the clutch/chain will change alot depending on the bike you ride.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 14:55 Quote
skerby wrote:
Is the clutch drag not just extra LSC though? I have found that stiction and LSC sorta go hand in hand, like they feel really similar and sorta do the same thing.

From a guy that has been forced to run chainless a couple times because my chain broke at a bike park, I did notice the extra smoothness, but mostly noticed how quiet my bike was.

1. Yes, clutch friction and static bushing & seal friction ("stiction") are a kind of low-speed compression damping. The difference is they're static friction, which breaks away and becomes - much less - dynamic friction. It's the lowest quality, least predictable kind of compression damping. Ideally, these things would be zero and all compression damping would be from sources with zero static friction.

2. I'm not convinced people actually feel clutch friction. Push the clutch with your hand. Now push down on your bottom-bracket with the same force. How much did your suspension move? That gives a sense of the relative contribution of clutch friction.

I believe the "smoothness" of a chainless bike is a placebo effect, enhanced by the silence, and the surprising results of riders like Gwin and Mulally were due to the riders being extremely mindful to ride smoothly, knowing they didn't have the option to pedal out of a poorly executed turn.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 15:29 Quote
Clutch friction is the most noticeable on the hardtail.



Wink

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 20:26 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
skerby wrote:
Is the clutch drag not just extra LSC though? I have found that stiction and LSC sorta go hand in hand, like they feel really similar and sorta do the same thing.

From a guy that has been forced to run chainless a couple times because my chain broke at a bike park, I did notice the extra smoothness, but mostly noticed how quiet my bike was.

1. Yes, clutch friction and static bushing & seal friction ("stiction") are a kind of low-speed compression damping. The difference is they're static friction, which breaks away and becomes - much less - dynamic friction. It's the lowest quality, least predictable kind of compression damping. Ideally, these things would be zero and all compression damping would be from sources with zero static friction.

2. I'm not convinced people actually feel clutch friction. Push the clutch with your hand. Now push down on your bottom-bracket with the same force. How much did your suspension move? That gives a sense of the relative contribution of clutch friction.

I believe the "smoothness" of a chainless bike is a placebo effect, enhanced by the silence, and the surprising results of riders like Gwin and Mulally were due to the riders being extremely mindful to ride smoothly, knowing they didn't have the option to pedal out of a poorly executed turn.
do you believe that people can't tell the difference in "sticktion" between air and coil shocks too?

The clutch force has a noticeable effect on the way the bike tracks small bumps. You can feel most clutch derailleurs breakaway if you push down on the seat. Its less obvious on a brand new derailleur, but one with a few days in a bike park will feel noticeably notchy. It's also most noticeable in the smallest gears because the clutch has more mechanical advantage due to the position of the cage.

I notice both on my downhill bike.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 21:18 Quote
Nobble wrote:
do you believe that people can't tell the difference in "sticktion" between air and coil shocks too?

The clutch force has a noticeable effect on the way the bike tracks small bumps. You can feel most clutch derailleurs breakaway if you push down on the seat. Its less obvious on a brand new derailleur, but one with a few days in a bike park will feel noticeably notchy. It's also most noticeable in the smallest gears because the clutch has more mechanical advantage due to the position of the cage.

I notice both on my downhill bike.

Okay.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 3:09 Quote
Making your bike silent gives one of those weird placebo effects where you think the bike is somehow better. I went crazy with the mastic tape and Velcro on my latest build and thought I had just hit mtb nirvana somehow.

The biggest one for me was cushcore and 20psi in the tyres. When you combine that with coil front and rear suspension you get a sense of invincibility that can get you into trouble lol.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 6:19 Quote
my bike is pretty silent just because my freehub is pretty quiet, i really love hearing my tires in the dirt but its also good cause a lot of trails i ride arent exactly legal and them musty ass rangers are known to listen for loud freehubs (its a thing around here; rich guys buy bikes with chris king or i9 hubs, rangers listen for the loud hubs and wait at the bottom of trails with tickets in hand) so mine is quiet more out of necessity to poach

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 11:05 Quote
Too bad Shimano canned scylence. That would have been pretty trick.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 11:47 Quote
Bflutz625 wrote:
Too bad Shimano canned scylence. That would have been pretty trick.

The rear hub was shaping up to be the standout of the new XTR group:

• Silent
• Light, unlike other silent hubs
• Zero driver drag
• Super wide flange spacing
• Available in an 11-speed version with even wider flange spacing

Most people seem to assume Boost and Super Boost spacing inherently creates stronger wheels due to wider flange spacing, but it's not always the case. At least one company simply puts different end caps on their non-Boost hub to create a Boost hub. Many Boost hubs have narrower flange spacing than some non-Boost models. Compared to some hubs, the 11-speed Scylence hub was going to have nearly one centimeter more offset on the drive side alone.

I don't think people realize how superior this hub nearly was.


 
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