Sexiest AM/enduro bike thread. Don't post your bike. Rules on first page.

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Sexiest AM/enduro bike thread. Don't post your bike. Rules on first page.
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Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 11:45 Quote
I guess I will have to repost it in a couple months when it has a different fork on it that matches the shock a little bit better . . . .. Wink

Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 11:51 Quote
mixmastamikal wrote:
That is an interesting thought. I know the appeal that is marketed is that you have a different axle path than traditional telescopic fork to deal with square edge hits better but I never had thought about how that would alter trail until now which it obviously has to.

The possible benefits of linkage forks go far beyond just the axle path. The designer has control over:

• Axle path / compliance: it's not constrained to moving in a straight line.
• Brake dive: with traditional forks, about 30% of the brake force is compresses the fork as dive (plus the rider's weight shift); linkage forks can have as much or little resistance to dive as the designer wants.
• Friction: Moves on bearings, instead of sliding on linear bushings.
• Motion ratio: Doesn't have to be an inherently linear, 1:1 ratio.
• Bump steer: Some linkage systems can have different steering input:output ratios at different points in the travel.

There are many ways they can improve on telescoping forks, but also a lot of opportunities to get it wrong and create an expensive mess.

To keep on topic with this thread, another problem is the appearance: people are used to telescoping forks and linkage designs aren't always the prettiest things. Maybe we'll eventually think telescoping forks loop primitive or cheap. Maybe not. If you were riding in the '80s, though, people used to feel telescoping suspension forks were an abomination, so you never know!

Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 11:52 Quote
mixmastamikal wrote:
I guess I will have to repost it in a couple months when it has a different fork on it that matches the shock a little bit better . . . .. Wink
Lookin forward to it!

Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 12:03 Quote
mixmastamikal wrote:
I guess I will have to repost it in a couple months when it has a different fork on it that matches the shock a little bit better . . . .. Wink


Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 7:19 Quote
mixmastamikal wrote:
That is an interesting thought. I know the appeal that is marketed is that you have a different axle path than traditional telescopic fork to deal with square edge hits better but I never had thought about how that would alter trail until now which it obviously has to.

My buddies shop was lent one from Trust a while ago and he just took it down to Moab for a couple of weeks and was very impressed with the performance especially with regard to square edge hits like they claim. However I also know someone who rides lot of freeride and bigger jumps and he bought one and rode it for a while and it was not for him at all so he sold it. Said off of lips it was very squirrly and unpredictable. Granted he is not a suspension guru like my other buddy is so it could have been primarily due to setup.

Here is his bike which I think is pretty sexy other than the uncut steer tube (Demo Fork) but that EXT Storia makes up for it.

Range 29 with Trust Shout and EXT Storia V3 Shock
I have heard others complain about the way linkage forks feel on jump faces. I think it mostly has to do with the fact that the front center isnt drastically shortening like it is on a telescoping fork, but rigid forks jump good. So maybe if the kinematics were tuned right it could actually work pretty well.

Jumping weird is a deal breaker for probably everyone besides maybe a racer who will make that sacrifice because the fork is so much better elsewhere.

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 7:47 Quote
skerby wrote:
[ ... ] the front center isnt drastically shortening like it is on a telescoping fork, but rigid forks jump good. So maybe if the kinematics were tuned right it could actually work pretty well.

Trust forks shorten more rapidly than telescoping forks. At 50% compression, a Trust Shout has shortened the front-centre twice as much as would be the case with a telescoping fork. This does not have to be the case with linkage forks; as you said, it's a matter of choice on the kinematics.

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 7:50 Quote
My brief experience with the Trust message was positive as a whole. Thing was really capable for its intentions, really ironed out the rough.

Two things that were initially alarming for me, but ended up being easy to adapt to were:

1. Tight corner "slaps" created a feeling of the front wheel tucking. I believe this is a direct effect of the wheels rearward axle path, and something that didnt kill me but just felt strange.

2. The fork feels stiffer than an equivalently sprung telescopic fork when pushing down through the bars or landing drops/jumps. Made for a couple of weird airbourne manouevres to begin with, but soon felt quite normal. The landings were a little harsher, though.

Lotta potential for linkage forks. I can get over the looks quite easily. Certainly provide some thinking material.

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 10:57 Quote
As far as looks of linkage forks go, when you're on the bike with them fitted you can't really see them.

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 11:27 Quote
deli-hustler wrote:
As far as looks of linkage forks go, when you're on the bike with them fitted you can't really see them.

i think they're hoping that you'll be riding fast enough that no one else will see it either haha

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 13:00 Quote
sosburn wrote:
deli-hustler wrote:
As far as looks of linkage forks go, when you're on the bike with them fitted you can't really see them.

i think they're hoping that you'll be riding fast enough that no one else will see it either haha
That as well

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 22:30 Quote
Some of the approaches I use when marketing linkage forks:

1. Even the most conservative current bikes would've looked crazy several years ago.
2. Race cars don't look pretty, they look fast.
3. What's more embarrassing: riding a weird-looking fork or being dropped by someone riding a better-performing fork?

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 22:33 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Some of the approaches I use when marketing linkage forks:

1. Even the most conservative current bikes would've looked crazy several years ago.
2. Race cars don't look pretty, they look fast.
3. What's more embarrassing: riding a weird-looking fork or being dropped by someone riding a better-performing fork?

Don’t really care how a bike looks, just care if it’s fast

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 22:34 Quote
thunder-nuggets wrote:
Don’t really care how a bike looks, just care if it’s fast

I think we're in the wrong thread! lol

Posted: Dec 11, 2019 at 22:40 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
thunder-nuggets wrote:
Don’t really care how a bike looks, just care if it’s fast

I think we're in the wrong thread! lol

lol right! Haha

Posted: Dec 12, 2019 at 1:02 Quote
I'm more about what works and is easy to use


 
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