Show your all mountain bike

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Show your all mountain bike
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Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 13:54 Quote
thunder-nuggets wrote:
metaam wrote:
I wonder how many people will make use of the alternative shock and rear end set ups that are available with this frame.

literally no one

theres one dude in enduro weight game who preaches about it any chance he gets but honestly i dont think its very practical

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 14:18 Quote
Beecee336 wrote:
Cool concept but like nuggs said. I'm not sure anyone will use them.
Sick bike though. I've thought about trying one out. They're local to me. Pretty good bunch of guys. And the custom options from the factory is pretty rad.

yeah, cool idea for the people that can do it, but most people just set it and forget it

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 14:45 Quote
I would bet that 90% of adjustments on frames go completely untouched after a month or so of novelty n probably better then 80% never get touched at all.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 18:48 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
I would bet that 90% of adjustments on frames go completely untouched after a month or so of novelty n probably better then 80% never get touched at all.

I bet half of the 80% don't even know their bike has geo adjustments.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 18:51 Quote
I bet 5/3% don't know what geo is.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 5:55 Quote
Geographical location for adjusting geo on frames

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 8:09 Quote
lance-h wrote:
badbadleroybrown wrote:
What frame is that, a Canyon?

I thinks it’s a Gorilla Gravity

Yup, it's a Guerrilla Gravity.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 8:20 Quote
metaam wrote:
I wonder how many people will make use of the alternative shock and rear end set ups that are available with this frame.

I doubt that anyone is buying all the parts to make the swap between rides. However I think IF you had bought the bike in an enduro set-up because you lived someplace with steep gnarly terrain... but then had to move to a place with more flow / xc trail type riding (or vice versa), you could then buy the parts to make the swaps. Which would save you from having to buy another bike. It's a cool option even though most buyers will never make use of it.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 8:27 Quote
drake88 wrote:
metaam wrote:
I wonder how many people will make use of the alternative shock and rear end set ups that are available with this frame.

I doubt that anyone is buying all the parts to make the swap between rides. However I think IF you had bought the bike in an enduro set-up because you lived someplace with steep gnarly terrain... but then had to move to a place with more flow / xc trail type riding (or vice versa), you could then buy the parts to make the swaps. Which would save you from having to buy another bike. It's a cool option even though most buyers will never make use of it.
The biggest reason GG did this is so they can cut down on the number of standard parts they need to manufacture and stock. This allows them to run more sustainably. What would happen if they designed a line of 4 bikes that all used different front triangles, made 50 of each in each size, then went to market with them. If one of the models is not popular, but one model is more popular than the number of bikes they made, they are kind of SOL and stuck with a bunch of unsold bikes. the current business model is designed to prevent that from happening.

to me it seems to be less for the consumer than people are making it out to be.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 10:03 Quote
drake88 wrote:
metaam wrote:
I wonder how many people will make use of the alternative shock and rear end set ups that are available with this frame.

I doubt that anyone is buying all the parts to make the swap between rides. However I think IF you had bought the bike in an enduro set-up because you lived someplace with steep gnarly terrain... but then had to move to a place with more flow / xc trail type riding (or vice versa), you could then buy the parts to make the swaps. Which would save you from having to buy another bike. It's a cool option even though most buyers will never make use of it.
my home trails are pretty xc, my plan is to get a trail pistol for day-to-day riding, and convert to a Smash for BC riding. All I need to swap is shock and seatstay, my fork has adjustable travel.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 10:06 Quote
skivt27 wrote:
drake88 wrote:
metaam wrote:
I wonder how many people will make use of the alternative shock and rear end set ups that are available with this frame.

I doubt that anyone is buying all the parts to make the swap between rides. However I think IF you had bought the bike in an enduro set-up because you lived someplace with steep gnarly terrain... but then had to move to a place with more flow / xc trail type riding (or vice versa), you could then buy the parts to make the swaps. Which would save you from having to buy another bike. It's a cool option even though most buyers will never make use of it.
The biggest reason GG did this is so they can cut down on the number of standard parts they need to manufacture and stock. This allows them to run more sustainably. What would happen if they designed a line of 4 bikes that all used different front triangles, made 50 of each in each size, then went to market with them. If one of the models is not popular, but one model is more popular than the number of bikes they made, they are kind of SOL and stuck with a bunch of unsold bikes. the current business model is designed to prevent that from happening.

to me it seems to be less for the consumer than people are making it out to be.

Oh I agree, there's definitely an advantage from a manufacturing side. If that's what helps them grow their business and reduce risk I'm all for it!

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 10:09 Quote
skivt27 wrote:
drake88 wrote:
metaam wrote:
I wonder how many people will make use of the alternative shock and rear end set ups that are available with this frame.

I doubt that anyone is buying all the parts to make the swap between rides. However I think IF you had bought the bike in an enduro set-up because you lived someplace with steep gnarly terrain... but then had to move to a place with more flow / xc trail type riding (or vice versa), you could then buy the parts to make the swaps. Which would save you from having to buy another bike. It's a cool option even though most buyers will never make use of it.
The biggest reason GG did this is so they can cut down on the number of standard parts they need to manufacture and stock. This allows them to run more sustainably. What would happen if they designed a line of 4 bikes that all used different front triangles, made 50 of each in each size, then went to market with them. If one of the models is not popular, but one model is more popular than the number of bikes they made, they are kind of SOL and stuck with a bunch of unsold bikes. the current business model is designed to prevent that from happening.

to me it seems to be less for the consumer than people are making it out to be.

The way GG is doing it is cool, and definitely serves the company (and environment) more than the consumer.
but i think for the most part, other companies like SC who put flip chips in their frames are just making more work for themselves. its a cool to think about having the option to run 27.5+/29 but i mean really how often are consumers switching that stuff up? if you design a bike one way, it should be optimized for that way and sold in that final, optimized configuration.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 16:40 Quote
Everyone thinks they're smarter than the engineering teams who design most bikes.
Few people are actually right about this.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 21:58 Quote
sosburn wrote:
skivt27 wrote:
drake88 wrote:


I doubt that anyone is buying all the parts to make the swap between rides. However I think IF you had bought the bike in an enduro set-up because you lived someplace with steep gnarly terrain... but then had to move to a place with more flow / xc trail type riding (or vice versa), you could then buy the parts to make the swaps. Which would save you from having to buy another bike. It's a cool option even though most buyers will never make use of it.
The biggest reason GG did this is so they can cut down on the number of standard parts they need to manufacture and stock. This allows them to run more sustainably. What would happen if they designed a line of 4 bikes that all used different front triangles, made 50 of each in each size, then went to market with them. If one of the models is not popular, but one model is more popular than the number of bikes they made, they are kind of SOL and stuck with a bunch of unsold bikes. the current business model is designed to prevent that from happening.

to me it seems to be less for the consumer than people are making it out to be.

The way GG is doing it is cool, and definitely serves the company (and environment) more than the consumer.
but i think for the most part, other companies like SC who put flip chips in their frames are just making more work for themselves. its a cool to think about having the option to run 27.5+/29 but i mean really how often are consumers switching that stuff up? if you design a bike one way, it should be optimized for that way and sold in that final, optimized configuration.


Having more options is always better. You might like a peticular setup, but someone else might have different setup preferences. It’s better to have them, (adjustable geo) and not need them, than to need them and not have them.


 
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