Enduro/AM - The Weight Game

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Enduro/AM - The Weight Game
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Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 10:32 Quote
you ca make anything you want for yourself, not to sell though

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 10:46 Quote
Arnoodles wrote:
Nobble wrote:
PHeller wrote:
They patented the attachment method to the threaded piece of metal that the nipples threads on.

Basically, they patented a "chinese finger trap" method of attaching the string to the metal piece.
link to the patented part? A similar design has been used for years in high pressure hydraulic and electrical cable management applications.

Just like every conceivable suspension geometry was used in cars.

Novel application of existing technology is patentable.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 15:27 Quote
PHeller wrote:
Ok - another topic:

I have the opportunity to switch out my order for a 120 (or 130)mm trail bike for a 145mm sled. I could also short stroke the 145mm bike down to 140mm.

I could build them virtually the same weight.

The 145mm has 10mm longer chainstays. Otherwise geometry can be made nearly identical.

For those of you on shorter travel bikes, when do you miss the longer travel option? I feel like for 90% of my riding, I have no need for a longer travel bike. Especially since I'm planning on running a coil (at 130mm travel) on the shorter travel bike.

A guy a follow on the gram who rides daily and was thinking of giving up his bike due to back problems has noticed an incredible improvement riding a longer travel bike over his previous 135mm bike (he went Hightower to Carbine).

Thoughts?

Short travel here , just to bring the fun factor back plus risk Vs reward

A lot of people seem to be riding the merry f*ck out of their Evil bikes with a simple fork swap out - best of both for the best bang for your buck. Highly capable & built to take anything in their wake - dual/single

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 16:21 Quote
B650wagon wrote:
you ca make anything you want for yourself, not to sell though
Not in the US... you can still be sued even for personal usage, but it's not economically reasonable to do so.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 17:19 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
B650wagon wrote:
you ca make anything you want for yourself, not to sell though
Not in the US... you can still be sued even for personal usage, but it's not economically reasonable to do so.

True, you can be sued for anything here!

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 17:51 Quote
Soupherb wrote:
PHeller wrote:

For those of you on shorter travel bikes, when do you miss the longer travel option?

Short travel here , just to bring the fun factor back plus risk Vs reward

A lot of people seem to be riding the merry f*ck out of their Evil bikes with a simple fork swap out - best of both for the best bang for your buck. Highly capable & built to take anything in their wake - dual/single

You mean from a standpoint of - going for a shorter travel bike your less likely to bigger drops and faster descents because the bike holds you back a bit?

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 17:54 Quote
PHeller wrote:
You mean from a standpoint of - going for a shorter travel bike your less likely to bigger drops and faster descents because the bike holds you back a bit?

BMXers hit 20-stair sets to flat. It's not about what you can or can't do, it's about how you want the bike to feel and how interactive you want the ride to be.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 17:56 Quote
Shorter travel bike + full coil setup and same tires + riding the exact same terrain at the same speed = more destroyed rims.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 18:08 Quote
Kitejumping wrote:
Shorter travel bike + full coil setup and same tires + riding the exact same terrain at the same speed = more destroyed rims.

Have you considered more pressure in your tires?

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 18:14 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Kitejumping wrote:
Shorter travel bike + full coil setup and same tires + riding the exact same terrain at the same speed = more destroyed rims.

Have you considered more pressure in your tires?

Rebuilt the rear wheel with a spank vibrocore and it has been holding up much better.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 18:37 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
PHeller wrote:
You mean from a standpoint of - going for a shorter travel bike your less likely to bigger drops and faster descents because the bike holds you back a bit?

BMXers hit 20-stair sets to flat. It's not about what you can or can't do, it's about how you want the bike to feel and how interactive you want the ride to be.

aka how much punishment your body/fitness can handle and to some extent the bike as well.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 18:55 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
PHeller wrote:
You mean from a standpoint of - going for a shorter travel bike your less likely to bigger drops and faster descents because the bike holds you back a bit?

BMXers hit 20-stair sets to flat. It's not about what you can or can't do, it's about how you want the bike to feel and how interactive you want the ride to be.
For me, travel has a lot more to do riding through rough shit and maintaining control than it does with drops and shit like that. Try taking a rigid bike through a rock garden or some blown out roots and changing direction... that's where full suspension shines imo.

Posted: Jun 20, 2019 at 19:11 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
PHeller wrote:
You mean from a standpoint of - going for a shorter travel bike your less likely to bigger drops and faster descents because the bike holds you back a bit?

BMXers hit 20-stair sets to flat. It's not about what you can or can't do, it's about how you want the bike to feel and how interactive you want the ride to be.

For me, travel has a lot more to do riding through rough shit and maintaining control than it does with drops and shit like that. Try taking a rigid bike through a rock garden or some blown out roots and changing direction... that's where full suspension shines imo.

Yes, absolutely. And when you're not riding that kind of terrain, the bike is squishier and less responsive. Trade-offs. The question that started this was why a person might want less suspension and the answer is responsiveness / agility. Neither is better in every situation or for every rider.

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 11:03 Quote
Gonna try some Revolution Grips. Got some on sale at Jenson for 35% off so decided why not? $50 for grips that normally cost $90? Hell yea.

I've been rocking ESI copies for a few years now and they certainly work. A recent couple of rides on classic lock-on grips was a rude awakening that my hands/wrists need more than just solid rubber.

My problem is, I don't like thick grips. I like really soft thin grips. Hopefully the Rev Grips combine the best of both worlds, the "softness" of thick pillowy rubber or silicone ESI Chunky, but with better durability and a smaller OD.

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 12:00 Quote
PHeller wrote:
Gonna try some Revolution Grips. Got some on sale at Jenson for 35% off so decided why not? $50 for grips that normally cost $90? Hell yea.

I've been rocking ESI copies for a few years now and they certainly work. A recent couple of rides on classic lock-on grips was a rude awakening that my hands/wrists need more than just solid rubber.

My problem is, I don't like thick grips. I like really soft thin grips. Hopefully the Rev Grips combine the best of both worlds, the "softness" of thick pillowy rubber or silicone ESI Chunky, but with better durability and a smaller OD.

Rev Grips can't offer much "pillowy" effect for their thickness: there's simply no way to do that when more hardware is crammed between the surface and the bar. Their rubber is thinner than a push-on grip of comparable diameter.

What Rev Grips can do is offer a lot more shear movement. This may be more effective than radial movement, so the design has potential. It's possible the Revs could feel as firm as typical Lock-Ons (which I agree are too firm), yet not wreck your hands. Looking forward to your review!


 
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