Enduro/AM - The Weight Game

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Enduro/AM - The Weight Game
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Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 12:18 Quote
There's no reason a front linkage can't be adapted to a cross-country race design. You can't turn an enduro frame into a cross-country racer by changing the fork, so an integrated front suspension wouldn't introduce any additional limitations to that.

If an inexplicably generous benefactor were interested in only roller bearing telescoping forks and willing to pay me handsomely to develop these forks, then yes, I would jump at the chance and make it my life's work.

If, however, this spendthrift cycling philanthropist were open to alternatives, I would advise him or her to pursue integrated linkages. The upside to a roller bearing telescoping fork is only a reduction of friction on an otherwise conventional design. A proven, successful, and marketable design, of course, but nothing radically new. My interest in integrated linkages is not only in the linkage, which I think would be enough to justify the project, but also in emerging design tools and manufacturing technologies.

Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 12:24 Quote
That's interesting - you think integrated linkages like those employed by Structure are a better options than traditional "component" linkage forks? As in, we'll never reach "peak linkage" until we abandon the traditional stem/steerer/crown interface?

Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 12:41 Quote
Telescoping forks didn't get good overnight. Had we put as much time, effort, and money into linkages as we have into telescoping forks, I believe the situation would be different than the current comparison between highly refined telescoping forks and fledgling linkage forks.

It can be argued - rightly - that linkages haven't taken over the motorcycle world, so perhaps they don't deserve to take over mountain bikes. This is possible. But current, commercially viable, and high performing linkage motorcycle forks do exist, and all high-end car suspension systems are double-wishbone, which is essentially the same, so there's evidence of viability in a similar situation and evidence of market domination in a situation of less similarity.

My vision is that telescoping forks will continue to be the right choice for low-end bikes, while high-end bikes will be better served by linkages - much like how rear suspension on low-end bikes is dominated by single-pivot designs and the vast majority of high-end bikes use multi-link designs.

As I mentioned, my current interest is more than just integrated linkages. Emerging design tools and manufacturing methods will also change the high-end market in the next decade.

Also, could I request we don't use that company as the reference for integrated front linkages? My feelings toward them are ... not positive.

Posted: Dec 10, 2019 at 13:03 Quote
A fun discourse, as always.

Swan, sad to hear that heli mechanics get paid so poorly when local. I'd think airports would be clamoring for good mechanics, then again they probably only need a few.

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 6:56 Quote
Got this yesterday. Believe the hype. Pretty cool.
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Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 7:28 Quote
PHeller wrote:
A fun discourse, as always.

Swan, sad to hear that heli mechanics get paid so poorly when local. I'd think airports would be clamoring for good mechanics, then again they probably only need a few.

There are a few local mechanics that get paid decent. And if you willing to move to AK, you can make bank..

Probably for me is we have had 3 schools within 60 miles cranking out mechanics for 50 years now.. So our area is flooded with people willing to work for cheap. Most of us have left the industry.

Not to say I wouldn't jump at one of those high paying jobs if them became available. Just people retire out of those jobs and usually there is a line out the door of young guys looking to replace them while working for less $$.

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 16:30 Quote
swan3609 wrote:
PHeller wrote:
A fun discourse, as always.

Swan, sad to hear that heli mechanics get paid so poorly when local. I'd think airports would be clamoring for good mechanics, then again they probably only need a few.

There are a few local mechanics that get paid decent. And if you willing to move to AK, you can make bank..

Probably for me is we have had 3 schools within 60 miles cranking out mechanics for 50 years now.. So our area is flooded with people willing to work for cheap. Most of us have left the industry.

Not to say I wouldn't jump at one of those high paying jobs if them became available. Just people retire out of those jobs and usually there is a line out the door of young guys looking to replace them while working for less $$.

Come to Canada, the industry is hurting for people right now, demand is high, and salaries are high.

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 16:40 Quote
RMWB wrote:
swan3609 wrote:
PHeller wrote:
A fun discourse, as always.

Swan, sad to hear that heli mechanics get paid so poorly when local. I'd think airports would be clamoring for good mechanics, then again they probably only need a few.

There are a few local mechanics that get paid decent. And if you willing to move to AK, you can make bank..

Probably for me is we have had 3 schools within 60 miles cranking out mechanics for 50 years now.. So our area is flooded with people willing to work for cheap. Most of us have left the industry.

Not to say I wouldn't jump at one of those high paying jobs if them became available. Just people retire out of those jobs and usually there is a line out the door of young guys looking to replace them while working for less $$.

Come to Canada, the industry is hurting for people right now, demand is high, and salaries are high.
Except Alberta where one in four young men are unemployed and can't find work.

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 16:50 Quote
ajax-ripper wrote:
RMWB wrote:
swan3609 wrote:


There are a few local mechanics that get paid decent. And if you willing to move to AK, you can make bank..

Probably for me is we have had 3 schools within 60 miles cranking out mechanics for 50 years now.. So our area is flooded with people willing to work for cheap. Most of us have left the industry.

Not to say I wouldn't jump at one of those high paying jobs if them became available. Just people retire out of those jobs and usually there is a line out the door of young guys looking to replace them while working for less $$.

Come to Canada, the industry is hurting for people right now, demand is high, and salaries are high.
Except Alberta where one in four young men are unemployed and can't find work.

I'm talking specifically about helicopter mechanics.

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 17:15 Quote
Any problems recently with job permits with this new NAFTA and stuff

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 17:17 Quote
Axxe wrote:
Any problems recently with job permits with this new NAFTA and stuff

Is this a question or a statement?

Posted: Dec 15, 2019 at 21:58 Quote
RMWB wrote:
ajax-ripper wrote:
RMWB wrote:


Come to Canada, the industry is hurting for people right now, demand is high, and salaries are high.
Except Alberta where one in four young men are unemployed and can't find work.

I'm talking specifically about helicopter mechanics.

It an entirely different licensing up there.. It's a 4 year degree compared to our 2 year....


And moving to Canada entirely defeats the "living out of a suit case" I didn't like about my high paying gig here in the states.. One fire season, I made just under 60k in 4 months.. But I also was home 4 days within that 4 months. It was a great gig when wife was in school. But I am a home body and got tired of traveling to BFN location and living in shit hole motels for months.

Posted: Dec 16, 2019 at 12:58 Quote
swan3609 wrote:
RMWB wrote:
ajax-ripper wrote:

Except Alberta where one in four young men are unemployed and can't find work.

I'm talking specifically about helicopter mechanics.

It an entirely different licensing up there.. It's a 4 year degree compared to our 2 year....


And moving to Canada entirely defeats the "living out of a suit case" I didn't like about my high paying gig here in the states.. One fire season, I made just under 60k in 4 months.. But I also was home 4 days within that 4 months. It was a great gig when wife was in school. But I am a home body and got tired of traveling to BFN location and living in shit hole motels for months.

I got my A&P a couple years ago for some work that never materialized. I figured it would be almost as easy to get an AME licence, but maybe not.

There are few jobs up here that allow you to be a true homebody but the operators are getting so much better with schedules. most are 2 or 3 weeks on/off.

Posted: Dec 16, 2019 at 16:19 Quote
The schools down here are cranking out panel pullers. Textron is just about the only place worth working. Check out Able Engieering at Gateway in Az. New beautiful facility hiring techs.

Posted: Dec 22, 2019 at 0:34 Quote
Looking for some recommendations for SPD shoes that are reasonably weather-resistant. Have some AM45's at the moment that soak up heaps of water and take ages to dry, which isn't ideal. Aiming to use them on the enduro bike, as well as for commuting.


 
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