Enduro/AM - The Weight Game

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Enduro/AM - The Weight Game
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Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 12:17 Quote
you can give the revgrips a shot, get killer reviews for helping hand and arm fatigue

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 12:46 Quote
countshreddy wrote:
you can give the revgrips a shot, get killer reviews for helping hand and arm fatigue

i think he was using those before

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 12:53 Quote
sosburn wrote:
countshreddy wrote:
you can give the revgrips a shot, get killer reviews for helping hand and arm fatigue

i think he was using those before

ah, late to the party here

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 13:12 Quote
I’ve been lucky to get some substantial miles in this month and was running into hand pain on long rides. I noticed a slight kink in my wrist in a seated position. Rolled my bars forward a few mm and it seems to take a lot of pressure off the hands. I’d mess with this and saddle position. Free and you can always move them back.

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 13:57 Quote
Rotating your brake levers up towards a Yoann Barelli style setup helped me with grip and hand issues, so maybe that’s something else you can freely experiment with.

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 14:01 Quote
Making sure that your grips are a large enough diameter can also help. I recently realized that I have long palms and short fingers, so I have to make sure my grips are large enough to accommodate my entire grip length. I currently run Ergon GE-1 Evo

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 14:12 Quote
seraph wrote:
Making sure that your grips are a large enough diameter can also help. I recently realized that I have long palms and short fingers, so I have to make sure my grips are large enough to accommodate my entire grip length. I currently run Ergon GE-1 Evo
Too fat can also cause issues. The GE1 is pretty much the best grip to exist...

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 14:31 Quote
After switching to push on grips I’d have a hard time going back to lock on. Between that abs flatter levers I’ve all but gotten rid of arm pump.

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 16:19 Quote
I was discussing with a few mates on a ride last week what we thought the future of e-bikes and mtb's will be in a few years' time. Figured a lot of you will have interesting opinions, so here goes.

Now that I'm back home in country Australia for a couple weeks, the average weekend can easily involve 6-7000 feet of climbing, which means 8-12 hours ride time over the two days.
We were discussing that a very low-power e-bike that added maybe 2kg to a bike would make it possible to ride a good bit more without significantly changing the way the bike felt.

Now that the big S has a 38lbs e-bike, it seems like the future of e-bikes could certainly include 33-35lbs bikes that provide ~100w instead of the standard ~250w. I think the general e-bike market will still want the battery life and power of current e-bikes, but our riding crew can't be the only one who would be interested in low-power e-bikes for big consecutive days in the alpine.

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 16:37 Quote
riish wrote:
I was discussing with a few mates on a ride last week what we thought the future of e-bikes and mtb's will be in a few years' time. Figured a lot of you will have interesting opinions, so here goes.

Now that I'm back home in country Australia for a couple weeks, the average weekend can easily involve 6-7000 feet of climbing, which means 8-12 hours ride time over the two days.
We were discussing that a very low-power e-bike that added maybe 2kg to a bike would make it possible to ride a good bit more without significantly changing the way the bike felt.

Now that the big S has a 38lbs e-bike, it seems like the future of e-bikes could certainly include 33-35lbs bikes that provide ~100w instead of the standard ~250w. I think the general e-bike market will still want the battery life and power of current e-bikes, but our riding crew can't be the only one who would be interested in low-power e-bikes for big consecutive days in the alpine.
I think what you're after is the future for lots of folks. Most people who buy ebikes use them as a tool to extend ride distance and often end up running them in eco mode most of the time.

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 16:38 Quote
I am entertaining dumping my Levo and buying an SL.. My dad and wife both have Levos that I could use if I want power.

But I'll admit that most of my ebike rides turn into me riding up stupid steep trails that I could never imagine riding a regular MTB and probably still too steep and gnarly to ride the 250w SL up.. Generally if I grab the Levo over a regular bike, I end up somewhere where I want all the power.

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 19:50 Quote
riish wrote:
I was discussing with a few mates on a ride last week what we thought the future of e-bikes and mtb's will be in a few years' time. Figured a lot of you will have interesting opinions, so here goes.

Now that I'm back home in country Australia for a couple weeks, the average weekend can easily involve 6-7000 feet of climbing, which means 8-12 hours ride time over the two days.
We were discussing that a very low-power e-bike that added maybe 2kg to a bike would make it possible to ride a good bit more without significantly changing the way the bike felt.

Now that the big S has a 38lbs e-bike, it seems like the future of e-bikes could certainly include 33-35lbs bikes that provide ~100w instead of the standard ~250w. I think the general e-bike market will still want the battery life and power of current e-bikes, but our riding crew can't be the only one who would be interested in low-power e-bikes for big consecutive days in the alpine.

YES. THANK YOU. This is what I've been ranting about since the dawn of e-bikes!

It would also help with land access issues because the output is much more "human" than "machine".

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 20:55 Quote
swan3609 wrote:
I am entertaining dumping my Levo and buying an SL.. My dad and wife both have Levos that I could use if I want power.

But I'll admit that most of my ebike rides turn into me riding up stupid steep trails that I could never imagine riding a regular MTB and probably still too steep and gnarly to ride the 250w SL up.. Generally if I grab the Levo over a regular bike, I end up somewhere where I want all the power.

How's your drivetrain life? Wondering if we'll see some non-linear effects from a big guy riding like this, producing incredibly rapid wear. Or maybe not?

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 21:00 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
swan3609 wrote:
I am entertaining dumping my Levo and buying an SL.. My dad and wife both have Levos that I could use if I want power.

But I'll admit that most of my ebike rides turn into me riding up stupid steep trails that I could never imagine riding a regular MTB and probably still too steep and gnarly to ride the 250w SL up.. Generally if I grab the Levo over a regular bike, I end up somewhere where I want all the power.

How's your drivetrain life? Wondering if we'll see some non-linear effects from a big guy riding like this, producing incredibly rapid wear. Or maybe not?
Are you interested in my experience as a shop rat?

Posted: Feb 27, 2020 at 21:16 Quote
PHeller wrote:
Anyone experience hand numbness on mostly flat trails or smooth climbs and what did you do to resolve it?

This is probably due to the lack of movement in those situations, i.e. constant pressure.

Distribute the pressure via larger grips and/or grips with a "platform" or "wing" on the outer edge. I find this style reduces the security of my grip a little, but I'll still use grips like this for a while if I develop nerve issues on the ulnar side.

Make a point of moving your hands. Take a hand off the bar whenever convenient and give it a shake. Anything helps.

Do you have more weight on your hands than most riders? If so, is it due to a short butt-to-bar distance and/or low front end?


 
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