Enduro/AM - The Weight Game

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Enduro/AM - The Weight Game
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Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 12:24 Quote
Though I just bought my wife Specialized saddle. Mimic. Best fitting wide saddle.

Yes, I am a hypocrite. But f*ckers do make nice saddles.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 12:39 Quote
They do, indeed.

I've actually heard some dudes get on with the Power Mimic saddles just fine too.

My ass likes wide saddles. I'm a wide guy, and no not just fat (although some of that too). I've tried any number of different narrow saddles and they just don't work for me. Big channel, little channel, doesn't matter, my sit bones have been "measured" at 156-158 multiples times. I guess I've got lady hips. Specialized gets my saddle money because they are one of the few who makes different saddles in varying widths, so not only can I play with shape and cutout, but I can test a 155 against a 168.

I understand why some companies can't or don't want to compete against that amount of selection, but I'm not going to gamble on comfort.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 13:00 Quote
Circe wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
Circe wrote:
Yeah, but you had to ride a Specialized. Ewww...I will admit that SJ Evo was a dope bike.

I can't deny the public image issues with Specialized. Still, if we're looking at it in terms of making the world a better place, there's probably more good to be done by buying the cheapest bike that meets our performance criteria and donating the money we save to a charity.


You ever break a Specialized rear triangle? Oh sorry, that's not covered under our warranty. It's not considered part of the "main" frame. Right.

.

I am not going to tell you that I dont get frustrated with Special-ed sometimes over things..

But the number of warranty hookups they have given customers over the years that I personally would not have is kinda amazing.. Or have given whole bike replacements for issues on forks/shocks/wheels

And I have replaced 3 rear triangles this last year that specialized warrantied for customers..

I think most brands out there are going to have horror and success stories with customer service.

Specialized wouldn't warranty my carbon enduro frame that I hucked 40ft into a rock... Which fair enough. But inside dude dug around the back room and found a "paint sample" alloy enduro frame and sold it to me for $150. Definitely an acceptable outcome for a situation I created.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 13:36 Quote
Circe wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
Circe wrote:
Yeah, but you had to ride a Specialized. Ewww...I will admit that SJ Evo was a dope bike.

I can't deny the public image issues with Specialized. Still, if we're looking at it in terms of making the world a better place, there's probably more good to be done by buying the cheapest bike that meets our performance criteria and donating the money we save to a charity.

OR, I could vote with my money and support brands that care. For example, SCB and their killer customer service approach. See PHellers story.

You ever break a Specialized rear triangle? Oh sorry, that's not covered under our warranty. It's not considered part of the "main" frame. Right.

I could also become vegan because of climate change, or I could try to eat a balanced diet and support certified organic farmers that practice sustainable animal husbandry.


Yikes.

Okay, so it's a customer service issue. Fair enough and I understand your concerns. Personally, I'll take my chances with a cheaper frame that leaves enough money to buy a mountain of spares for the difference - providing the company doesn't have a bad record of availability of spares - but I do see the value in solid customer service and in rewarding companies that get it right without even needing to rely on customer service.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 14:23 Quote
Yeah I broke the seat stays on my pitch a bunch of years ago and they gave me they only warranty the main triangle of the frame no stay/links. But to be fair the replacement seat stay was around $100 so not a crazy price either.

Knolly has been great warranty wise for me and a few friends in the past.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 15:00 Quote
Specialized Stumpjumper Carbon Evo Pikes Reverb Stans Flows Mrp

All this talk of old Specialized’s reminded me of this. My first proper “pedalable” bike. At the time I couldn’t believe how well it went up hills and how smooth the pikes were. I’d never experienced anything like it and it was sub 30lbs. Funny how I thought smaller bikes were more playful and better to ride than something that would actually fit me

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 15:17 Quote
Aside from the rear derailleur and decals on the Pike, I'd have a hard time placing the age of the bike.

There was huge progress between 2000-2010, but aside from big wheels and longer geometry, not a lot has changed in the last 8-10 years.

Well, except the Fox Float CTD. Glad we're past those days.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 15:20 Quote

This bike was such a good bike it peddled pretty well and was a solid descender. If it wasn’t for the 1-1/8 steerer it would still be a solid bike.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 15:27 Quote
PHeller wrote:
Aside from the rear derailleur and decals on the Pike, I'd have a hard time placing the age of the bike.

There was huge progress between 2000-2010, but aside from big wheels and longer geometry, not a lot has changed in the last 8-10 years.

Well, except the Fox Float CTD. Glad we're past those days.

It’s funny how the size of the cassette can age a bike. It’s funny to think I rode most of the climbs I do now on eagle on a 34-36/11. Probably the main reason my fitness has gone

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 15:39 Quote
PHeller wrote:
Flagstaff local enduro pro Alex Pavon taking one for the team by posing for those stretching exercises.

I can't help but feel that Abbey, who was doing the yoga stuff regularly got tired of all the shitty comments.

I rode a 2015 Nomad the other day. Pretty crazy how weird 2015 "aggressive" geometry feels in comparison to my newschool 120mm 29er. The Nomad felt like a BMX bike. It's owner and I are pretty much the same build and height, but he runs a 35mm stem.

It's been interesting to ride my v3 Nomad back to back with the Evil Insurgent my mate just bought. At just over 5'9" the L Nomad fits me really well though.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 15:56 Quote
PHeller wrote:
There was huge progress between 2000-2010, but aside from big wheels and longer geometry, not a lot has changed in the last 8-10 years.

Well, except the Fox Float CTD. Glad we're past those days.

• Geometry has completely changed how bikes fit and handle.
• Stem lengths dropped by almost half.
• 700c wheels came on strong, gave way to 650b, and are now mostly dominant again.
• Pedaling kinematics have changed a great deal.
• Air shocks have proper negative springs.
• Motion ratios are no longer designed to compensate for wonky spring curves.
• The front derailleur vanished and chains stay on by themselves.
• Dropper posts became standard equipment.
• Fat bikes emerged.
• Plus tires came and went, but they left us with 2.6", which is far larger than old-school 2.7".
• Rims increased in width by about 40%.
• Tire compounds are stickier, yet also roll faster.
• Tubeless tires took over.
• e-bikes are out-selling human-powered bikes at many price points in many markets.
• Saddles have large channels and / or cut-outs and my junk really appreciates it.


mtbman1980 wrote:
[ Pitch ]

That generation of Pitch was better than most bikes twice - even three times - the price.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 16:29 Quote
R-M-R wrote:

• Geometry has completely changed how bikes fit and handle.
• Stem lengths dropped by almost half.
• 700c wheels came on strong, gave way to 650b, and are now mostly dominant again.
• Pedaling kinematics have changed a great deal.
• Air shocks have proper negative springs.
• Motion ratios are no longer designed to compensate for wonky spring curves.
• The front derailleur vanished and chains stay on by themselves.
• Dropper posts became standard equipment.
• Fat bikes emerged.
• Plus tires came and went, but they left us with 2.6", which is far larger than old-school 2.7".
• Rims increased in width by about 40%.
• Tire compounds are stickier, yet also roll faster.
• Tubeless tires took over.
• e-bikes are out-selling human-powered bikes at many price points in many markets.
• Saddles have large channels and / or cut-outs and my junk really appreciates it.


But besides these things not much has changed.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 16:31 Quote
I have been riding nothing but the Levo since last September.. Probably 30-40 rides since then with zero time on any other bikes. I definitely don't really have any issue with jumping it or tossing it around on the trail.

Dad and I went for a ride last week and he rode my Levo and I jumped on my "not exactly light" 34lb steel Hardtail.. It was absolutely silly how light and playful the hardtail felt to jump.. And then going back to the Levo I definitely noticed how adapted I had gotten to its weight.

I could see the appeal of the Levo SL now.

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 16:38 Quote
https://forestal.com/en/home

How about a 38.4 lbs ebike. What is your Levo weight?

Posted: Mar 24, 2020 at 16:41 Quote
swan3609 wrote:
I have been riding nothing but the Levo since last September.. Probably 30-40 rides since then with zero time on any other bikes. I definitely don't really have any issue with jumping it or tossing it around on the trail.

Dad and I went for a ride last week and he rode my Levo and I jumped on my "not exactly light" 34lb steel Hardtail.. It was absolutely silly how light and playful the hardtail felt to jump.. And then going back to the Levo I definitely noticed how adapted I had gotten to its weight.

I could see the appeal of the Levo SL now.
shirk-007 wrote:
https://forestal.com/en/home

How about a 38.4 lbs ebike. What is your Levo weight?

I can't decide whether this is on topic.


 
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