Enduro/AM - The Weight Game

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Enduro/AM - The Weight Game
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Posted: Apr 4, 2020 at 17:18 Quote
The BBG was a rad tire from Kenda that I would love to see a modern version.

Posted: Apr 4, 2020 at 17:23 Quote
Back in the day I was a fan of WTB tires, and before that I was into Tioga.

Posted: Apr 4, 2020 at 17:56 Quote
Every tire company has had their moment - I suppose that's why we remember them! Some made products that aimed right for the middle of the market and executed it well, like Maxxis, and some chased the fringe markets and were often ahead of their time.

WTB has always been pushing toward large, light tires, with models like the Tyrannoraptor 2.25 and (undersized) Weirwolf 2.55 LT. Panaracer had the enormous (for the time) Fire FR 2.4 and Specialized had the short-lived BigHit 2.5 that would've been brilliant if any rim at the time could've supported it.

shirk-007, Yes the BBG was incredible in its time.

seraph, Tioga's Factory DH 2.3 with the lighter casing was a preview of aggressive trail tires from half a decade in the future. Great tires. I remember testing them in '98 or '99 and I just wasn't ready for them: the traction and compliance were amazing and they didn't seem to slow me down, yet they said "DH' on the hotpatch and such a heavy ( Rolleyes ) and huge ( Rolleyes Rolleyes ) tire couldn't possibly be efficient, so I didn't continue with them, even though I was riding faster and having more fun. Facepalm

Posted: Apr 4, 2020 at 18:22 Quote
I was running leftover tiago dh 2.3s up until I didn’t own a 26 inch anymore, so about 2013 when the original process came out. I found an un used stash of those tires in the basement of the shop I worked for and obviously no one wanted to buy them by that time so the owner said I could run them, they actually were a pretty good front tire for riding fresh cut trails in Vermont.

Posted: Apr 4, 2020 at 22:13 Quote
When first got into mtb I was hooked on the IRC Kujo DH. That was a cool tire.

Posted: Apr 4, 2020 at 23:14 Quote
The last tires I ran on 26" rims were Intense Tyres. I wonder why they never made 27.5" and 29" tires? They had some killer tread patterns.

I ran the Edge in the rear

And the Invader in the front

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 1:22 Quote
dirtnapped wrote:
When first got into mtb I was hooked on the IRC Kujo DH. That was a cool tire.

Good tires at the time, but the rubber compound was just too hard. IRC quietly kept making decent tires, though, and the new Tanken is decent. Panaracer, too, speaking of Japanese tires.


seraph wrote:
The last tires I ran on 26" rims were Intense Tyres. I wonder why they never made 27.5" and 29" tires? They had some killer tread patterns.

They were made by Vee. Notice the similarities between the Edge and the Bulldozer, for example. I was a big fan of the "DH", the predecessor of the Invader, on my downhill bike and the EX DC Lite version (light casing, dual compound with faster rebound on the central lugs) was great on the trail bike.

Intense / Vee tires were the first to use an extremely slow rebounding rubber. Not the softest durometer, but the benefit of slow rebound changed bike tire design.

Get a current Vee and you'll be getting a vastly evolved version of the old favourites. Vee, like Kenda, seems to be making a real effort to modernize.

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 7:45 Quote
R-M-R wrote:

Intense / Vee tires were the first to use an extremely slow rebounding rubber. Not the softest durometer, but the benefit of slow rebound changed bike tire design.

What are the benefits of a slow rebounding tire??

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 12:02 Quote
I was referring specifically to the rubber compound, but the same can be true of the entire casing. The extent to which the rubber conforms to the contours of the surface is due to how soft it is, measured by the durometer. The problem with a fast rebounding rubber is it then wants to rebound right back to the original shape, while a slow rebounding rubber will hold the shape of whatever it's against.

Both a low durometer (soft and sticky) and slow rebound (doesn't deflect away) help traction. Low durometer tends to reduce durability more than slow rebound, while slow rebound reduces rolling efficiency. Finding the right balance of these factors isn't easy! The change that Intense / Vee brought about was a willingness to introduce the rebound rate variable, which had previously been avoided.

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 13:34 Quote
Weren’t the maxxis slow reezay tires available around the same time?

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 13:50 Quote
theweaz wrote:
Weren’t the maxxis slow reezay tires available around the same time?

My recollection is the Intense tires came first.

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 14:39 Quote
Pretty sure sloweezay was out years before Intense... I think Maxxis was discontinuing it around the time Intense was beginning to use it.

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 15:18 Quote
It's possible the SRY40 came first. Not how I recall it, but it's been a while. Definitely not phasing it out at that time, though, as I purchased SRY40 tires almost a decade after my first Intense tires. Maxxis still uses 42a and 40a compounds on their 3C MaxxGrip tires, which I think are the original ST42 and SRY40 compounds (or minor variants).

Posted: Apr 5, 2020 at 17:23 Quote
I've owned so many pairs of supertacky DHF's. Such a great tyre.

Posted: Apr 7, 2020 at 10:22 Quote
Question for the suspension wizards among us - is the 2018 27.5" Fox 36 RC2 170mm air shaft the same one that would be used in a 2019 29" Fox 36 Grip 2 to get 170mm travel?

I know the same Rockshox air shaft gives a different amount of travel for 27.5" and 29" forks, but my Googling makes it seem as though they are the same shaft between Fox forks of different wheel sizes. Fox also appears to use the same air shaft for RC2 and Grip 2 damper forks, just specifies that they need to be 2018 or newer.

Can anyone confirm or deny? Thanks!


 
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