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Enduro/AM - The Weight Game

PB Forum :: Pinkbike Groups
Enduro/AM - The Weight Game
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Posted: Oct 21, 2021 at 22:20 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
chunter wrote:
dirtnapped wrote:
Correct, from the rails to the seating surface. I’m currently using a Charge Spoon, and I am after 5-10mm. I’m ok with minimal padding as long as the shape fits.

I think you’d literally have to measure them individually in the flesh. But like BBLB said, I don’t think there’s a large variation. Based on side profiles, I feel like a WTB Silverado is pretty low in stack, but that’s not much to go on.
Good suggestion... as mountain saddles go I think that's about as low as you'll find.

One of the lowest stack that I know.

Classic comfort right there! Wtb is good people

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 0:20 Quote
Get a dropper with finer travel adjustments.

It makes no sense to search around for some Goldilocks thin saddle to save a few mm of dropper post.

People think they’ll die if they can’t ride a 200mm dropper.

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 2:01 Quote
Hi everyone. At work we're doing a pretty exciting new project which I can't say much about yet but we're looking for some input from the community. I've got a short survey with some fairly basic questions that'll help us a lot - of course we want to make sure it's as relevant as possible to the average person so this input will really help.

Hopefully you don't mind me hijacking the weight game forum for this, I think you guys are the most relevant (and opinionated Razz ) group on here. Should only take a minute or 2 to fill in and of course any feedback (missing options, etc.) is appreciated.

Linky

Of course you'll be the first to know once I can say a bit more but for now you'll just have to speculate Wink

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 3:10 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
I don't see why you would need more than 1 "master" mechanic... you need one dude who can do complex shit, stays up to date on leading edge tech, knows how to work on suspension and build wheels and then you need some dudes who can put bikes together and change tubes and tires and adjust derailleurs.

Last shop I was at had builders at the warehouse. Mechanics at the shops were there to churn out repairs. At our shop we did mostly mid to high end road and mountain bikes. We had extremely rich clientele who demanded the best work. "Some dudes who can put bikes together and change tubes" wouldn't cut it. And the profit/margin numbers for that company were insane.

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 8:20 Quote
seraph wrote:
Last shop I was at had builders at the warehouse. Mechanics at the shops were there to churn out repairs. At our shop we did mostly mid to high end road and mountain bikes. We had extremely rich clientele who demanded the best work. "Some dudes who can put bikes together and change tubes" wouldn't cut it. And the profit/margin numbers for that company were insane.
That's the shop that you said was paying people well though right? So that seems like a well organized semi boutique approach.

Last road bike I bought, the mechanic told me it wasn't possible to run the climbing switches on my 9170 levers without an external b junction running wire to reach shifter independently rather than internal routing with the bar end junction because they don't have the third e-port... so I had to explain to him how to do it with the JC130 Y wire. Then they couldn't figure out how to get the R9100-P to show power, so I had to explain that shimano still requires a magnet. They really don't do high end builds there so I wasn't overly bothered that they were nonplussed on how to deal with this setup but, in reality, a customer buying a $12k bike shouldn't need to clue in the mechanics on how to put it together. So I think there's a real value to every shop having one highly competent guy and if a shop can support paying a few of those guys then that's even better but more of a case by case basis.

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 9:07 Quote
Being professional ought not to cost too much anyways, take the passion that’s exhibited freely here on PB, a truly enthused MTB/road mechanic would be all over it, always ready for that new new

Nerd fest turned into a working wage

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 10:00 Quote
I've been lurking here for a while and finally want to put my 2 cents in as an industry professional.

Mechanics working in a shop are going to always be limited in their potential salary cap as there's generally not enough margin left on the table to continue to increase their pay to the extent that's been said previously in this thread. There's ways to make more money, but it involves taking on substantially more risk by starting your own gig. I don't think this would be much different than any other industry as a mechanic in that you eventually work up to a given industries salary cap. Same as a sales rep; a sales rep in the bike industry will not make as much as a sales rep in the pharmaceutical industry.

Only way to get past that cap is to venture out on your own and take the risk.

I do think mechanics will start to see things being more lucrative as shops shift away from being so heavily invested in the bike sales side of things as D2C channels start picking off more and more customers. Shops will shift more heavily into the service side of the industry which in turn would mean less overhead.

I started my career in the industry working in a bike shop in sales. I fully understood that unless I wanted to own my own shop, I'd never be able to attain the level of income I wanted. That's why I shifted to working as a supplier/manufacturer and invested a ton of sweat equity to build up to the position I really wanted to be in.

In my experience there's plenty of opportunity out there, you just have to be willing to take a risk or make a change. Complaining that you should be making more money doesn't really work when the shop simply doesn't have the profits to support that. Take a look at your current shop's operation and understand some additional revenue you can bring to the table with your skillset by offering a new service. Make a business plan for the owner and put in the sweat equity to make it a success.

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 10:16 Quote
clapforcanadaa wrote:
I do think mechanics will start to see things being more lucrative as shops shift away from being so heavily invested in the bike sales side of things as D2C channels start picking off more and more customers. Shops will shift more heavily into the service side of the industry which in turn would mean less overhead.
.
This is a big aspect of why I think mobile mechanics are going to be a big opportunity in the future. There are a huge number of people out there who do not know how to assemble and setup the fit on their bikes no matter how simple D2C brands try to make it and I see D2C as a market that's only going to get bigger.

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 10:20 Quote
clapforcanadaa wrote:
I've been lurking here for a while and finally want to put my 2 cents in as an industry professional.

Mechanics working in a shop are going to always be limited in their potential salary cap as there's generally not enough margin left on the table to continue to increase their pay to the extent that's been said previously in this thread. There's ways to make more money, but it involves taking on substantially more risk by starting your own gig. I don't think this would be much different than any other industry as a mechanic in that you eventually work up to a given industries salary cap. Same as a sales rep; a sales rep in the bike industry will not make as much as a sales rep in the pharmaceutical industry.

Only way to get past that cap is to venture out on your own and take the risk.

I do think mechanics will start to see things being more lucrative as shops shift away from being so heavily invested in the bike sales side of things as D2C channels start picking off more and more customers. Shops will shift more heavily into the service side of the industry which in turn would mean less overhead.

I started my career in the industry working in a bike shop in sales. I fully understood that unless I wanted to own my own shop, I'd never be able to attain the level of income I wanted. That's why I shifted to working as a supplier/manufacturer and invested a ton of sweat equity to build up to the position I really wanted to be in.

In my experience there's plenty of opportunity out there, you just have to be willing to take a risk or make a change. Complaining that you should be making more money doesn't really work when the shop simply doesn't have the profits to support that. Take a look at your current shop's operation and understand some additional revenue you can bring to the table with your skillset by offering a new service. Make a business plan for the owner and put in the sweat equity to make it a success.

This so dang much! evolve or die!

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 15:37 Quote
I kinda wonder where the highest margins are in the bike industry?

Probably ebikes and events. Selling machine built Chinese wheels with different branding?

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 17:27 Quote
Margins for who? The manufacturer or the shop?

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 18:28 Quote
It is not margins. Margins can be what f*cking ever. It is about what people voluntary agree to be paid. As long as there are enough of them, there is ZERO reason to pay them more. As soon as they are not around, offers will go up.
It does not matter how much money I have. I pay my gardener the going rate.
Any attempt to artificially change such an arrangement of voluntary, free, and honest market results in shit and eventually war and murder. No better system exists and will not exist and anyone not understanding that is an idiot.

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 19:08 Quote
Margins matter for an employee owned business.

If someone wanted to make the most money in the bike industry, what type of business should the start?

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 19:50 Quote
PHeller wrote:
Margins matter for an employee owned business.

If someone wanted to make the most money in the bike industry, what type of business should the start?

I feel like labor has the best margins because its simply your time, and the more efficient you are the more you make.

Posted: Oct 22, 2021 at 21:20 Quote
tbeezle wrote:
PHeller wrote:
Margins matter for an employee owned business.

If someone wanted to make the most money in the bike industry, what type of business should the start?

I feel like labor has the best margins because its simply your time, and the more efficient you are the more you make.

Labor does have the best margin, generally. All you have to factor in is how much you pay your employee, and how much labor they can churn out. Last shop I was at, we charged $600 for a frame-up build. Current shop I'm at we charge $160. Eek


 
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