Enduro/AM - The Weight Game

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Enduro/AM - The Weight Game
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Posted: Jan 20, 2022 at 21:00 Quote
fredro wrote:
I ride all the time, can you send me your skills? Why let them waste....?

This is going to come off as incredibly egotistical...


I have a tremendous amount of natural skill and a very strong natural cardio ability. Then I ran cross country at a national level as a teenager and was top 20 in the US as a Junior for Cyclocross and a Cat 2 roadie.. I definitely worked to get there, but much of my skill set came naturally. I could pretty much get on any bike and race on a national level... I probably could have been like Graves where with a change in training program, I could have be competive in various disciplines. I race DH competitively in the pro class all at this same time.

I have a old timer that calls me the greatest waste of cycling talents he has ever seen....called me the Tomac that could have been. lol

When I was 22, I looked around and saw how many washed up 30 year old pros were broken off and they didn't have anything in the bank account and or really anything to them other than the years of "trying to make it". I decided that I didn't want to try and ride at that level as I didn't think the potential long term downfalls were worth the risks.... Plus I had my wife to look after and my eventual family.. Had I been single, things may have been different.


I'll ride again.. Just rentals, starting the new business and other life BS had me too busy to ride the last few years.

Posted: Jan 20, 2022 at 21:08 Quote
sooooooo there's a chance.....you sending skills? What's your Zelle? I pay now.

Posted: Jan 20, 2022 at 21:10 Quote
fredro wrote:
sooooooo there's a chance.....you sending skills? What's your Zelle? I pay now.

I'd take 3 cases of diapers that will last the kids like 4 days and I'll see what I can do.

Posted: Jan 20, 2022 at 21:51 Quote
Axxe wrote:
zeeman wrote:
That's cool, Seraph.

Skilled trades. I considered becoming a PG&E lineman, HVAC tech, plumber... I've had many jobs: (bike shop of course), construction management, woodwork. Outdoorsy gigs along the way. Now I'm a freelance draftsman and ADU builder. Nextdoor accounts in Northern and Southern Marin keep me damn busy when I need quick cash.
I do miss having insurance though.


Thanks Fredro, staying on topic I see

I have been bantering with Seraph here for a while, but online bullshit aside he strikes me as a grounded dude with good attitude. I am sure he will land on his feet with just a few good decisions to make.

I appreciate the words, that actually means a lot to me. Especially since I just lost my job and am currently seeking gainful employment. It's tough with a resumé full of only bike shop gigs for the last 23-ish years.

Posted: Jan 20, 2022 at 22:39 Quote
Good luck dude. Hopefully losing your job will wind up being a blessing and the push you needed to crack into another industry. Saying that, it doesn’t make the situation any easier just now. Stick in there!

Posted: Jan 20, 2022 at 23:17 Quote
seraph wrote:
Axxe wrote:
zeeman wrote:
That's cool, Seraph.

Skilled trades. I considered becoming a PG&E lineman, HVAC tech, plumber... I've had many jobs: (bike shop of course), construction management, woodwork. Outdoorsy gigs along the way. Now I'm a freelance draftsman and ADU builder. Nextdoor accounts in Northern and Southern Marin keep me damn busy when I need quick cash.
I do miss having insurance though.


Thanks Fredro, staying on topic I see

I have been bantering with Seraph here for a while, but online bullshit aside he strikes me as a grounded dude with good attitude. I am sure he will land on his feet with just a few good decisions to make.

I appreciate the words, that actually means a lot to me. Especially since I just lost my job and am currently seeking gainful employment. It's tough with a resumé full of only bike shop gigs for the last 23-ish years.

Were you sales or wrench at the bike shop? I know a few wrenches that left the shop and went into other manufacturing or machine shop type jobs and have made a killing compared to the bike shop..

A sales guy left to go work as a warranty manager for a home builder and also does very well. If you were good at what you did at the shop, those skills should cross over.


That was an issue I had with some of the industry folk.. The "professional bike mechanics" thought that they were some super special breed of mechanic whom deserved to be held on a pedastal.. Bikes are simple machines.. Di2 and suspension rebuilds are next level, but for the most part, bikes are simple machines.

Hell we don't even do the fun artistic stuff like align frames, face head tubes and bottom brackets or straighten dropouts/forks anymore..

Posted: Jan 20, 2022 at 23:36 Quote
swan3609 wrote:
seraph wrote:
Axxe wrote:


I have been bantering with Seraph here for a while, but online bullshit aside he strikes me as a grounded dude with good attitude. I am sure he will land on his feet with just a few good decisions to make.

I appreciate the words, that actually means a lot to me. Especially since I just lost my job and am currently seeking gainful employment. It's tough with a resumé full of only bike shop gigs for the last 23-ish years.

Were you sales or wrench at the bike shop? I know a few wrenches that left the shop and went into other manufacturing or machine shop type jobs and have made a killing compared to the bike shop..

A sales guy left to go work as a warranty manager for a home builder and also does very well. If you were good at what you did at the shop, those skills should cross over.


That was an issue I had with some of the industry folk.. The "professional bike mechanics" thought that they were some super special breed of mechanic whom deserved to be held on a pedestal.. Bikes are simple machines.. Di2 and suspension rebuilds are next level, but for the most part, bikes are simple machines.

Hell we don't even do the fun artistic stuff like align frames, face head tubes and bottom brackets or straighten dropouts/forks anymore..

Classically trained bike wrench. Went to UBI in 1998. Facing, chasing, tapping, extracting broken bolts, etc... I'm mostly good at the old mechanical stuff. I love the simplicity of the AXS stuff but really XTR M952 is more my jam. I really enjoy filing, grinding, and other modifications to make things fit.

How should I market myself to machine shops? "I like bikes and I love to tinker" just makes me sound like a nerd. lol

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 1:25 Quote
seraph wrote:
swan3609 wrote:
seraph wrote:


I appreciate the words, that actually means a lot to me. Especially since I just lost my job and am currently seeking gainful employment. It's tough with a resumé full of only bike shop gigs for the last 23-ish years.

Were you sales or wrench at the bike shop? I know a few wrenches that left the shop and went into other manufacturing or machine shop type jobs and have made a killing compared to the bike shop..

A sales guy left to go work as a warranty manager for a home builder and also does very well. If you were good at what you did at the shop, those skills should cross over.


That was an issue I had with some of the industry folk.. The "professional bike mechanics" thought that they were some super special breed of mechanic whom deserved to be held on a pedestal.. Bikes are simple machines.. Di2 and suspension rebuilds are next level, but for the most part, bikes are simple machines.

Hell we don't even do the fun artistic stuff like align frames, face head tubes and bottom brackets or straighten dropouts/forks anymore..

Classically trained bike wrench. Went to UBI in 1998. Facing, chasing, tapping, extracting broken bolts, etc... I'm mostly good at the old mechanical stuff. I love the simplicity of the AXS stuff but really XTR M952 is more my jam. I really enjoy filing, grinding, and other modifications to make things fit.

How should I market myself to machine shops? "I like bikes and I love to tinker" just makes me sound like a nerd. lol

Aren't we all just nerds at the end of the day?

I've spent around 100 working hours this month looking at fabric CFD's. Not even my role, just helping out Whip

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 5:09 Quote
seraph wrote:
swan3609 wrote:
seraph wrote:


I appreciate the words, that actually means a lot to me. Especially since I just lost my job and am currently seeking gainful employment. It's tough with a resumé full of only bike shop gigs for the last 23-ish years.

Were you sales or wrench at the bike shop? I know a few wrenches that left the shop and went into other manufacturing or machine shop type jobs and have made a killing compared to the bike shop..

A sales guy left to go work as a warranty manager for a home builder and also does very well. If you were good at what you did at the shop, those skills should cross over.


That was an issue I had with some of the industry folk.. The "professional bike mechanics" thought that they were some super special breed of mechanic whom deserved to be held on a pedestal.. Bikes are simple machines.. Di2 and suspension rebuilds are next level, but for the most part, bikes are simple machines.

Hell we don't even do the fun artistic stuff like align frames, face head tubes and bottom brackets or straighten dropouts/forks anymore..

Classically trained bike wrench. Went to UBI in 1998. Facing, chasing, tapping, extracting broken bolts, etc... I'm mostly good at the old mechanical stuff. I love the simplicity of the AXS stuff but really XTR M952 is more my jam. I really enjoy filing, grinding, and other modifications to make things fit.

How should I market myself to machine shops? "I like bikes and I love to tinker" just makes me sound like a nerd. lol
Bike shops are not the end of the business. You could take your knowledge to the corporate side of the industry. Depends if a 9-5 job is something you would be interested in. Usually the pay is much better and you have weekends off.

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 5:11 Quote
seraph wrote:
swan3609 wrote:
seraph wrote:


I appreciate the words, that actually means a lot to me. Especially since I just lost my job and am currently seeking gainful employment. It's tough with a resumé full of only bike shop gigs for the last 23-ish years.

Were you sales or wrench at the bike shop? I know a few wrenches that left the shop and went into other manufacturing or machine shop type jobs and have made a killing compared to the bike shop..

A sales guy left to go work as a warranty manager for a home builder and also does very well. If you were good at what you did at the shop, those skills should cross over.


That was an issue I had with some of the industry folk.. The "professional bike mechanics" thought that they were some super special breed of mechanic whom deserved to be held on a pedestal.. Bikes are simple machines.. Di2 and suspension rebuilds are next level, but for the most part, bikes are simple machines.

Hell we don't even do the fun artistic stuff like align frames, face head tubes and bottom brackets or straighten dropouts/forks anymore..

Classically trained bike wrench. Went to UBI in 1998. Facing, chasing, tapping, extracting broken bolts, etc... I'm mostly good at the old mechanical stuff. I love the simplicity of the AXS stuff but really XTR M952 is more my jam. I really enjoy filing, grinding, and other modifications to make things fit.

How should I market myself to machine shops? "I like bikes and I love to tinker" just makes me sound like a nerd. lol

Hand skills, you have them, showcase that. Unfortunately you will still need to find an "In" and prove yourself with actual work. Starting at the bottom (think bike shop box cutter) learning new, relevant skills along the way. Fortunately in most trades there is little in the way of pretentiousness. If you are good and effective at the work, your years of experience don't matter that much. You will have a big leg up on younger newcomers as you have an idea of what work ethic and responsibility look like.

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 7:21 Quote
Which trades would you all suggest insofar as transferable skills?

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 8:03 Quote
sherbet wrote:
Which trades would you all suggest insofar as transferable skills?

Any recreational vehicle maintenance (dirt bike, snowmobile, ATVs) this especially true if you are in to suspension. automotive maintenance, aircraft maintenance, coffee machine maintenance (not even joking, there is a huge industry around this)

Getting in to trades at the lower level, no one is going to expect you to know how to do everything. That's the whole point of apprenticeship and OJT. Your willingness to learn and work ethic matter much more.

Full disclosure, I'm in Aircraft Maintenance and drive a desk now. If I could do it all over again, Id be an electrician. Maybe I still will do that.

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 8:19 Quote
sherbet wrote:
Which trades would you all suggest insofar as transferable skills?
aviation, defense, and aerospace tend to have a lot of skilled labor technician or assembly type roles that would be a decent fit.

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 8:29 Quote
Sorry to hear it Seraph. The good news is that there are hundreds of bike shops in Portland and many are in need of skilled labor. You should be able to find a new job while you explore your options.

You should check out Google Grow. It's a (almost) free certificate program for on demand skills, like IT support. Complete the certification program and they'll actually help you with job placement. They're designed for people with no experience in the field.

IT jobs are in high demand and they pay exceptionally well. More importantly, its a desk job. It's sustainable long term

Posted: Jan 21, 2022 at 8:39 Quote
RMWB wrote:
sherbet wrote:
Which trades would you all suggest insofar as transferable skills?

Any recreational vehicle maintenance (dirt bike, snowmobile, ATVs) this especially true if you are in to suspension. automotive maintenance, aircraft maintenance, coffee machine maintenance (not even joking, there is a huge industry around this)

Getting in to trades at the lower level, no one is going to expect you to know how to do everything. That's the whole point of apprenticeship and OJT. Your willingness to learn and work ethic matter much more.

Full disclosure, I'm in Aircraft Maintenance and drive a desk now. If I could do it all over again, Id be an electrician. Maybe I still will do that.

I have a Aviation mantienience degree as well. Did it for a few years and left that industry. But it was really neat and something I could always go back to.

Starting from scratch at 18, I'd probably get Into GIS and land surveying...


 
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