Got Any DH Questions? Ask Them Here

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Got Any DH Questions? Ask Them Here
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Posted: Aug 16, 2022 at 6:03 Quote
norfiril wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:


^^^ This 100%. Every corner is different. And people have their own opinions about how to do them. Some coaches will even tell you to absolutely never drop your outside foot. The purpose of dropping your outside foot is to lower your center of gravity and try and get more weight into the tires, but when you put pressure down on the outside foot it effectively wants to make the bike stand straight up, so now you're fighting the bike while also trying to make it turn.

On another note, dropping your heels is a good move, which you're doing. And keeping your head up and looking out of the corner is really good. Looking where you want to go is one of the most beneficial parts of cornering well.

Thank you all for your replies.

I only drop my outside foot in flatter corners and/or when looking for traction. Useful for having more space for leaning the bike but in a berm like this it doesn’t make much sense IMO.

The corner has nothing special and it was only a drill for trying a different line in the entrance of the corner (just hit it slow and pumped to gain speed on the exit).

Just posted the video on IG and the other trainer (who’s also my mate) wrote me to be careful with the position of my hips and with this capture. This is confusing to me since I don’t see anything bad in that exact moment.

I will post the full video where I think there are more mistakes to point than that capture.


I'm not a certified trainer or anything but from what I'm seeing your overall body position seems fine. I'm sure there are very small tweaks you could make but hips and everything seem good enough to me in this particular corner.

Two suggestions I would make though would be try to get your braking done just a tad earlier. You were still braking while you had started turning. At that point in the turn there is enough support for you to lean the bike over and you could almost start pumping that high up in the turn since you're diving down into it. But if you hit the brakes harder earlier, then you will need less time to brake and will be able to get down to the speed you want for the corner. This is another instance where dropping your heels to really get some weight down into your tires will help.

Another thing is that I would attack out of the corner. Just one or two seconds out of the corner. If you're trying different lines and techniques in a corner it is to see what your exit speed will be. So I would try and keep it consistent and attack like you would in a race out of the corner to the next tree. From the video it looks like you somewhat "gave up" on the effort once you were done with the pump.

Again nothing major, just some small critiques. Straight line stuff doesn't differentiate people near as much as corners can. You've definitely got the fundamentals down.

Posted: Aug 16, 2022 at 8:26 Quote
norfiril wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:


^^^ This 100%. Every corner is different. And people have their own opinions about how to do them. Some coaches will even tell you to absolutely never drop your outside foot. The purpose of dropping your outside foot is to lower your center of gravity and try and get more weight into the tires, but when you put pressure down on the outside foot it effectively wants to make the bike stand straight up, so now you're fighting the bike while also trying to make it turn.

On another note, dropping your heels is a good move, which you're doing. And keeping your head up and looking out of the corner is really good. Looking where you want to go is one of the most beneficial parts of cornering well.

Thank you all for your replies.

I only drop my outside foot in flatter corners and/or when looking for traction. Useful for having more space for leaning the bike but in a berm like this it doesn’t make much sense IMO.

The corner has nothing special and it was only a drill for trying a different line in the entrance of the corner (just hit it slow and pumped to gain speed on the exit).

Just posted the video on IG and the other trainer (who’s also my mate) wrote me to be careful with the position of my hips and with this capture. This is confusing to me since I don’t see anything bad in that exact moment.

I will post the full video where I think there are more mistakes to point than that capture.

Views: 87    Faves: 0    Comments: 0

Only comment id make is that its generally good form to have your hips more over the outside of the bike mid turn, with your belly button aimed in the direction you want to turn. Your hips look very central over the bike, or maybe slightly inside. Again, every corner is slightly different, but in general id suggest concentrating a bit on the whole "place your hips outside the bike, point your hips into the turn" body position.

Its all very subtle, so don't force yourself into any crazy positions, just keep the idea in your head.

Posted: Aug 16, 2022 at 13:22 Quote
NorCalNomad wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
TravellerSeko wrote:
I've seen Max Hartensterns's bike and fell in love with that.

Does anyone have any idea where we can find this composite brake protector? I have checked but could not find any information.

https://www.pinkbike.com/photo/19522192/

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/bike-check-max-hartensterns-german-championship-winning-custom-2021-cube-two15.html

Bike Check - Max Hartenstern s 2021 Cube TWO15 HPC

I've never had anyone actually explain to me convincingly why these are a good idea...Not keeping enough heat in your brakes for them to work effectively is going to be a very unusual issue on a dh bike unless you are on a track with such a shallow gradient you are barely braking.

Only worth it for tracks with a ton of grit/ mud getting in there. And since it's normally cold and rainy in those situations the heat thing isn't as much of an issue. The TRP ones they made did have vents in them as well

Cheers mate. I have Magura MT5 brakes and live in Scotland and lots of mud and got weather is not an issue here

Posted: Aug 16, 2022 at 18:35 Quote
Hey there! full 29 high pivot downhill bikes have been looking sweet! any comments on commencal supreme VS Canfield Jedi?

Posted: Aug 17, 2022 at 7:58 Quote
Gwizard wrote:
Hey there! full 29 high pivot downhill bikes have been looking sweet! any comments on commencal supreme VS Canfield Jedi?
Supreme is the only answer

O+
Posted: Aug 17, 2022 at 8:34 Quote
Jedi is awesome. I am loving mine.

Posted: Aug 17, 2022 at 8:37 Quote
Gwizard wrote:
Hey there! full 29 high pivot downhill bikes have been looking sweet! any comments on commencal supreme VS Canfield Jedi?

Kind of depends on what you want the bike to "feel" like. The Supreme is going to be longer and slacker and lower overall. Lower BB height, longer wheelbase, slacker headtube angle. The Jedi looks like the reach is a tad longer but the chainstay is a good bit shorter. Pair that with a slightly steeper head tube angle and you get a shorter wheelbase.

The Supreme will feel more stable and planted at higher speeds in chunky rocks and in straight lines. But the Jedi will be a little more responsive in turns and in the air.

Don't think you could go wrong with either one. I would put the Jedi compared to the Ohlins version of the Supreme V5 and both are very well priced for what you will get.

Posted: Aug 17, 2022 at 9:14 Quote
notsosikmik wrote:
Jedi is awesome. I am loving mine.

I LOVED my Jedi F1! Fast bike!

Posted: Aug 17, 2022 at 13:30 Quote
BMXJJ327 wrote:
Gwizard wrote:
Hey there! full 29 high pivot downhill bikes have been looking sweet! any comments on commencal supreme VS Canfield Jedi?

Kind of depends on what you want the bike to "feel" like. The Supreme is going to be longer and slacker and lower overall. Lower BB height, longer wheelbase, slacker headtube angle. The Jedi looks like the reach is a tad longer but the chainstay is a good bit shorter. Pair that with a slightly steeper head tube angle and you get a shorter wheelbase.

The Supreme will feel more stable and planted at higher speeds in chunky rocks and in straight lines. But the Jedi will be a little more responsive in turns and in the air.

Don't think you could go wrong with either one. I would put the Jedi compared to the Ohlins version of the Supreme V5 and both are very well priced for what you will get.

I would agree with this based on the geo charts, however I'm an Xl rider, and the geo changes for the supreme in that size, (at least on paper) so I'm wondering if the canfield would actually be slacker, longer wheelbase etc.

Posted: Aug 18, 2022 at 8:18 Quote
norfiril wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:


^^^ This 100%. Every corner is different. And people have their own opinions about how to do them. Some coaches will even tell you to absolutely never drop your outside foot. The purpose of dropping your outside foot is to lower your center of gravity and try and get more weight into the tires, but when you put pressure down on the outside foot it effectively wants to make the bike stand straight up, so now you're fighting the bike while also trying to make it turn.

On another note, dropping your heels is a good move, which you're doing. And keeping your head up and looking out of the corner is really good. Looking where you want to go is one of the most beneficial parts of cornering well.

Thank you all for your replies.

I only drop my outside foot in flatter corners and/or when looking for traction. Useful for having more space for leaning the bike but in a berm like this it doesn’t make much sense IMO.

The corner has nothing special and it was only a drill for trying a different line in the entrance of the corner (just hit it slow and pumped to gain speed on the exit).

Just posted the video on IG and the other trainer (who’s also my mate) wrote me to be careful with the position of my hips and with this capture. This is confusing to me since I don’t see anything bad in that exact moment.

I will post the full video where I think there are more mistakes to point than that capture.

Views: 87    Faves: 0    Comments: 0

So I’d recommend getting some time at a pump track. Even on your DH bike which will be an awesome workout. It doesn’t look like you ride the trail more like you ride the bike. (You looked stiff maybe).

My .02c

Posted: Aug 18, 2022 at 8:37 Quote
BMXJJ327 wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
norfiril wrote:
Hi,

Speaking about the body position I received opposite feedback from two good riders / coaches.

Making some drills in one berm one told me the position is perfect but I should drop the external foot looking for more leaning when going faster. The other said the hips are too back and I should stay with a more centered position.

So confusing

It's impossible to make any useful suggestions based on one photo of one corner. Every corner is different, and what works for one, won't work for others.

Personally I'd say nothing stands out as obviously glaringly wrong in the photo you have posted. Without watching you ride for an extended period, even the best coach in the world couldn't tell you much more than that.

Anyone who uses the blanket rule "drop the outside foot" is usually talking nonsense though. Thats a very basic bit of rider lore, that more often than not actually makes things worse. Watch the pros ride and 90% of the time they keep their feet level. Other times they will absolutely drop the outside foot, but unless you are a total beginner, then usually this "drop the outside foot" advice is way too basic to be of any use.

^^^ This 100%. Every corner is different. And people have their own opinions about how to do them. Some coaches will even tell you to absolutely never drop your outside foot. The purpose of dropping your outside foot is to lower your center of gravity and try and get more weight into the tires, but when you put pressure down on the outside foot it effectively wants to make the bike stand straight up, so now you're fighting the bike while also trying to make it turn.

Carrying some good speed through that corner dude! I would definitely agree with the coach that said your hips are too far back. In a nice supportive corner like that one, I like to focus on keeping my chinbar right above the stem.

If you notice at the exit of the corner, your hips continue to be too far back, so you seem to be pulling back on the handlebars too. This is sub optimal because you lose some snappiness/steerage/traction over the front tire , because there isn't enough weight on it. In this particular section it is no big deal because there is a mellow straight section right after the exit for you to recover. However, if there was another feature immediately after, you would be in the back seat, which is no bueno. It is a very common mistake for people to be too rearward in supportive berms, which I think is due to survival instinct, aka fear.

To remedy, try two things: Carry that outside elbow higher so you maintain a stronger stance over the sweet spot in the frame. Second, focus on keeping your chin over your stem. Cheers mate

Posted: Aug 18, 2022 at 16:56 Quote
wllmd wrote:
norfiril wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:


On another note, dropping your heels is a good move, which you're doing. And keeping your head up and looking out of the corner is really good. Looking where you want to go is one of the most beneficial parts of cornering well.

Thank you all for your replies.

I only drop my outside foot in flatter corners and/or when looking for traction. Useful for having more space for leaning the bike but in a berm like this it doesn’t make much sense IMO.

The corner has nothing special and it was only a drill for trying a different line in the entrance of the corner (just hit it slow and pumped to gain speed on the exit).

Just posted the video on IG and the other trainer (who’s also my mate) wrote me to be careful with the position of my hips and with this capture. This is confusing to me since I don’t see anything bad in that exact moment.

I will post the full video where I think there are more mistakes to point than that capture.

Views: 87    Faves: 0    Comments: 0

So I’d recommend getting some time at a pump track. Even on your DH bike which will be an awesome workout. It doesn’t look like you ride the trail more like you ride the bike. (You looked stiff maybe).
Other suggestion is once you start carrying more speed to drag your rear brake through the turn some (don’t touch front except for emergency). What this does is adds weight to your front tire for better grip.

My .02c

True.

Today I spent like 3 hours on the pumptrack. I used to ride there but it’s been a while… I think it’s an amazing practice but you know, the context is different.

Nevertheless I began to feel comfortable leaning the bike more and turning my hips in the direction of the turn (when needed because one thing I realized I was doing wrong is turning my hips too soon).

Thanks also for the rear brake tip but it’s still hard for me to not use it. It’s annoying specially the few times I tried to schralp

Posted: Aug 18, 2022 at 17:00 Quote
MT36 wrote:
BMXJJ327 wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:


It's impossible to make any useful suggestions based on one photo of one corner. Every corner is different, and what works for one, won't work for others.

Personally I'd say nothing stands out as obviously glaringly wrong in the photo you have posted. Without watching you ride for an extended period, even the best coach in the world couldn't tell you much more than that.

Anyone who uses the blanket rule "drop the outside foot" is usually talking nonsense though. Thats a very basic bit of rider lore, that more often than not actually makes things worse. Watch the pros ride and 90% of the time they keep their feet level. Other times they will absolutely drop the outside foot, but unless you are a total beginner, then usually this "drop the outside foot" advice is way too basic to be of any use.

^^^ This 100%. Every corner is different. And people have their own opinions about how to do them. Some coaches will even tell you to absolutely never drop your outside foot. The purpose of dropping your outside foot is to lower your center of gravity and try and get more weight into the tires, but when you put pressure down on the outside foot it effectively wants to make the bike stand straight up, so now you're fighting the bike while also trying to make it turn.

Carrying some good speed through that corner dude! I would definitely agree with the coach that said your hips are too far back. In a nice supportive corner like that one, I like to focus on keeping my chinbar right above the stem.

If you notice at the exit of the corner, your hips continue to be too far back, so you seem to be pulling back on the handlebars too. This is sub optimal because you lose some snappiness/steerage/traction over the front tire , because there isn't enough weight on it. In this particular section it is no big deal because there is a mellow straight section right after the exit for you to recover. However, if there was another feature immediately after, you would be in the back seat, which is no bueno. It is a very common mistake for people to be too rearward in supportive berms, which I think is due to survival instinct, aka fear.

To remedy, try two things: Carry that outside elbow higher so you maintain a stronger stance over the sweet spot in the frame. Second, focus on keeping your chin over your stem. Cheers mate

Yep. Since I was cornering slow I tried to accelerate the exit exaggerating the posture a little at the end but totally agree with you.

Maybe it would be better to carry more speed from the begging and keep my hips and legs a little bit taller. What do you think?

Posted: Sep 3, 2022 at 15:26 Quote
Hi folks,
What is the best saddle for downhill? One of my friends recommended me Chromag Overture and he said it is very durable and comfortable saddle for DH, dirt bike and free ride. Actually it is the best looking saddle by far for me as well. Just wanted to see your opinions and recommendations as well. I wanna see more nice saddlesSmile

Posted: Sep 3, 2022 at 16:02 Quote
I would say the chromag trailmaster is more suited to a dh bike but if you really do suicide no handers then the overture has way better sides for pinching

I run overture on all 4 of my dirtjumpers but not on my dh bike


 
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