Post Your Road Bikes (Read 1st post for guide)

PB Forum :: Road Cycling and Touring
Post Your Road Bikes (Read 1st post for guide)
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Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 15:25 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
memento-mori wrote:
OG Speedplays on the road bike and Eggbeaters on the gravel bike for me.

Loved my Speedplays but the lack of four bolt shoes did them in for me. I was on the fence about paying extra for the custom Lake CX402's to get four hole soles but just went three hold and Dura Ace pedals and they just work so well that I have no complaints so, when I was faced with the same choice getting CX403's I went with three hole again. Still have my old pedals and some new cleats, might go back one day but I just can't fault SPD-SL enough to push me back.

Not sure I follow, I’m using my Speedplays on my 3 bolt interface shoes without problems? I’ve had them on 3 pairs of S-works shoes (6, 6 Sagan, 7) and on my current Fizik shoes without issues. They come with an adapter plate / spacer that initially connects to the 3 bolt interface of the shoe and then allows the assembly of the rest of the cleat.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 15:28 Quote
You get essentially 0 power from pulling on clipless pedals.

Bikeradar.

RoadcyclingUK.

The benefit of clipless pedals massively revolves around how stiff the shoes and pedal interface is, which makes for less losses in the system. Upstrokes are borderline a myth, and flats are within 5% of the same efficiency in most tests I've seen.

Think of a crocodile. Massive massive bite force, right? But it's really easy to keep their mouth shut, as their evolution didn't give them any reason to need to have a muscle group dedicated to opening their mouth with force. Your legs are the same way. Our legs are made to propel us forward with a pushing motion. There is essentially no trait within our leg's muscle groups that makes a pull motion strong. Evolution wise, the most we have to pull against weight wise is the weight of our legs.

Clipless absolutely does have better power transfer, and the dead zones are easier to move through, but it's entirely a marginal gain. If you're racing, they make a massive amount of sense. If you're not, it's mostly a question of ergonomics.

Clipless also tends to keep your ankle and knee locked into a position. When set correctly, that means you're less likely to strain tendons and ligaments by having your foot slightly misplaced. There's great reasons to ride clipless, pulling up isn't one of them.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 15:50 Quote
sherbet wrote:
You get essentially 0 power from pulling on clipless pedals.

Bikeradar.

RoadcyclingUK.

The benefit of clipless pedals massively revolves around how stiff the shoes and pedal interface is, which makes for less losses in the system. Upstrokes are borderline a myth, and flats are within 5% of the same efficiency in most tests I've seen.

Think of a crocodile. Massive massive bite force, right? But it's really easy to keep their mouth shut, as their evolution didn't give them any reason to need to have a muscle group dedicated to opening their mouth with force. Your legs are the same way. Our legs are made to propel us forward with a pushing motion. There is essentially no trait within our leg's muscle groups that makes a pull motion strong. Evolution wise, the most we have to pull against weight wise is the weight of our legs.

Clipless absolutely does have better power transfer, and the dead zones are easier to move through, but it's entirely a marginal gain. If you're racing, they make a massive amount of sense. If you're not, it's mostly a question of ergonomics.

Clipless also tends to keep your ankle and knee locked into a position. When set correctly, that means you're less likely to strain tendons and ligaments by having your foot slightly misplaced. There's great reasons to ride clipless, pulling up isn't one of them.

Research be damned, I find that if I'm having trouble on a steep hill I remind myself that I'm supposed to be pulling on the upstroke, and it helps me get up the rest of the hill.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 16:27 Quote
Tbh I don't pull up, maybe slightly if I'm sprinting but definitely not during normal rising. I just like the direct feeling and my feet staying in the right place with clips. On the odd occasion I ride flats on my MTB, it really frustrates me when my feet aren't exactly aligned as I'm so used to an exact position that you have with clips.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 19:53 Quote
memento-mori wrote:
badbadleroybrown wrote:
memento-mori wrote:
OG Speedplays on the road bike and Eggbeaters on the gravel bike for me.

Loved my Speedplays but the lack of four bolt shoes did them in for me. I was on the fence about paying extra for the custom Lake CX402's to get four hole soles but just went three hold and Dura Ace pedals and they just work so well that I have no complaints so, when I was faced with the same choice getting CX403's I went with three hole again. Still have my old pedals and some new cleats, might go back one day but I just can't fault SPD-SL enough to push me back.

Not sure I follow, I’m using my Speedplays on my 3 bolt interface shoes without problems? I’ve had them on 3 pairs of S-works shoes (6, 6 Sagan, 7) and on my current Fizik shoes without issues. They come with an adapter plate / spacer that initially connects to the 3 bolt interface of the shoe and then allows the assembly of the rest of the cleat.
I should have prefixed by saying I have had issues with the adapters and don't want to run them again. Used adapters for about a year and had a bunch of issues and then ran four bolt Sidi's for like six or seven years and they were a notable improvement all around, but when I replaced them, i wanted wider shoes... Lake are way better for wider feet but they only offer four hole in their narrower width unless you do custom. So I wound up with the three hole and didn't want to do adapters so I went to SPD-SL... and just can't find a reason to go back.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 20:01 Quote
sherbet wrote:
You get essentially 0 power from pulling on clipless pedals.

Bikeradar.

RoadcyclingUK.

.

That's not exactly what these studies showed... they found, as anyone who owned a pioneer power meter can attest to, you do create negative torque on the upstroke. The idea that you don't make power comes from the total output not rising... so someone who rides at 300w is still putting out 300w, but on flats that 300w is coming 100% from the muscles involved in the downstroke while clipless and pulling up distributes that load so that maybe 240w are coming from downstroke muscles and 60w are coming from the upstroke muscles.

So it does help you ride stronger by spreading the fatigue across more muscles.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 21:22 Quote
sherbet wrote:
Clipless absolutely does have better power transfer, and the dead zones are easier to move through, but it's entirely a marginal gain.

This right here, is the essence for me.

I don’t agree with the reasoning that if it’s a marginal gain, it makes more difference to a racer. That’s a relative value. A marginal difference to me vs my direct competition is a similar result a a marginal difference for a pro rider vs their direct competition. 10% is 10%, the only thing that can differ is the value this 10% represents.

The fact that I use clipless pedals enables me to keep a certain momentum differently from my naturally preferred type of pedaling. Something I’d not be able to do riding flats ie.

I’m the type of guy that prefers low cadence grinding big gears. However, in reality that’s less sustainable for longer, hard effort type of climbs ie. The fact that I can push and pull allows me to keep a relative high output at a higher cadence. As where I would only push, that cadence would end up lower and I’d either cramp up or simply not be able to sustain a certain required rotation of the cranks to keep moving.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 21:27 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
memento-mori wrote:
badbadleroybrown wrote:


Loved my Speedplays but the lack of four bolt shoes did them in for me. I was on the fence about paying extra for the custom Lake CX402's to get four hole soles but just went three hold and Dura Ace pedals and they just work so well that I have no complaints so, when I was faced with the same choice getting CX403's I went with three hole again. Still have my old pedals and some new cleats, might go back one day but I just can't fault SPD-SL enough to push me back.

Not sure I follow, I’m using my Speedplays on my 3 bolt interface shoes without problems? I’ve had them on 3 pairs of S-works shoes (6, 6 Sagan, 7) and on my current Fizik shoes without issues. They come with an adapter plate / spacer that initially connects to the 3 bolt interface of the shoe and then allows the assembly of the rest of the cleat.
I should have prefixed by saying I have had issues with the adapters and don't want to run them again. Used adapters for about a year and had a bunch of issues and then ran four bolt Sidi's for like six or seven years and they were a notable improvement all around, but when I replaced them, i wanted wider shoes... Lake are way better for wider feet but they only offer four hole in their narrower width unless you do custom. So I wound up with the three hole and didn't want to do adapters so I went to SPD-SL... and just can't find a reason to go back.

Got it!

I’m the same, I went with the wider Fizik one’s for the road recently (3 hole but no issues with the adapter plates for me whatsoever) and I’m using Lake shoes for gravel. The latter are quite heavy but comfortable.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 23:00 Quote
What’s a good modern bar tape that’s on the thinner side? Lots of options out there, it’s a little overwhelming! Good grip and durability in the winter is important as it’s for my CX bike. I’ve always just ridden cork and cotton tapes in the past on my classic steel bikes. I just can’t stand some of the extra chunky tapes I see out there nowadays.

Posted: Aug 12, 2022 at 23:14 Quote
singlespeedtoday wrote:
What’s a good modern bar tape that’s on the thinner side? Lots of options out there, it’s a little overwhelming! Good grip and durability in the winter is important as it’s for my CX bike. I’ve always just ridden cork and cotton tapes in the past on my classic steel bikes. I just can’t stand some of the extra chunky tapes I see out there nowadays.

Lizard Skins DSP 1.8 is grippy but thin.

Posted: Aug 13, 2022 at 7:09 Quote
singlespeedtoday wrote:
What’s a good modern bar tape that’s on the thinner side? Lots of options out there, it’s a little overwhelming! Good grip and durability in the winter is important as it’s for my CX bike. I’ve always just ridden cork and cotton tapes in the past on my classic steel bikes. I just can’t stand some of the extra chunky tapes I see out there nowadays.

Glad you asked this because I've been wanting to re-tape the old Allez. When I was refreshing it, my brother-in-law gifted some bar Fizik tape to me. it's chunky AF....but it got me back on the road. Benotto would be period correct, but I'm thinking I need to go up-to-date. Wink

Posted: Aug 13, 2022 at 7:17 Quote
With my dodgy wrists I go as thick as possible, I'm running 3.5mm gel tape!

Posted: Aug 13, 2022 at 20:23 Quote
Meh, I just ordered some boring old cork tape. I know it’ll work and the price was right! Trying not to overthink it anymore. Haha. Lizard Skins DSP looks promising, I’d like to see it in person before committing though.

Going to try something a bit different with the Ritchey Venturemax bars in 44cm, hopefully it’ll increase the comfort and fun factor on my bike enough to convince me on keeping this thing around. I’d definitely like to try my first cross race at some point, it looks like a lot of fun!

Posted: Aug 14, 2022 at 7:33 Quote
Bontrager GrippTack tape is amazing... similar to Lizard Skins but a bit more cushy without being thick. Great grip, wet or dry. Highly recommend. I'd never heard of it before a handful of years ago when it came on a bike and since then I've gone through a couple other tapes but always wind up coming back to it.

Posted: Aug 14, 2022 at 16:59 Quote
My new gravel/road bike, it's nothing fancy but it was cheap on the cycle to work scheme and it's comfortable which is the main thing I was aiming for. My old Canyon could only fit 28c tyres whereas this can fit 50c. With the rubbish roads around where I live and my dodgy wrist, this is way more comfortable. It's also perfect for exploring off road locally (it's too flat to be enjoyable on my MTB).
I've only made a few little upgrades so far; saddle, seatpost, bars, tape. I've also got another set of dedicated road wheels.


 
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