Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]

PB Forum :: Mechanics' Lounge
Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]
Author Message
Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 16:28 Quote
Clefrigh wrote:
Hello guys!

I have the next problem:

I want to fit the Hope V4 Caliper to a Shimano Saint Lever... I already tried this with mineral oil, but the main problem comes that the lever leaks the mineral oil. I already tried covering the excess bleed hole that have the lever, but after that it looks that the leak continues from the piston lever this time... and one of the 4 caliper on hope brake doesn't move when the lever is pressed.

What could be the problem?, why is not compatible with the shimano lever?, Do I need to change the gascket rings from Hope Caliper to another gascket rings that can be compatible with mineral oil?.

Thank you for your help.




2015 Used Shimano Saint BL-M820 Left Front Brake Lever

Hope V4 orange caliper with silver bore caps
I bet the seals in the caliper swelled up. Get mineral oil seals and give er a go, if they exist.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 17:24 Quote
Generally speaking mixing and matching levers and calipers is a no go. In your case there are three primary things fighting you.

1. Mineral oil and dot fluid are very incompatible and will often turn into some variety of coagulated bull shit when they mix. They also require two very different types of seals to work properly. You will need to rebuild the hope caliper with mineral oil compatible seals (if they exist), you may also need to replace the hose for the same reason.

2. Hope and Shimano master cylinder geometry are vastly different, there is a good chance that the saint lever does not push enough fluid to move the hope positions far enough.

3. The hope hose likely won't seal correctly in the Shimano lever due to different OD.

You could likely make it work with lots of time and effort, but at the end of the day your Frankenstein brake will be a mushy leaky mess.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 17:31 Quote
I know Hope makes SRAM compatible calipers for drop bar applications, but I haven't seen a mineral oil version.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 18:26 Quote
So I just watched this video and am now curious about studding tires for mountain biking in the winter.

It is worth doing? I have extra tires lying around to put studs/screws into, but will I run into unforeseen issues with riding a modern enduro bike in the winter (on hardpacked to icy trails)? I know this video is from 2012 from before fat bikes were a big thing, but I don't really want to get a fat bike right now.

Posted: Oct 9, 2019 at 21:28 Quote
coaster156 wrote:
So I just watched this video and am now curious about studding tires for mountain biking in the winter.

It is worth doing? I have extra tires lying around to put studs/screws into, but will I run into unforeseen issues with riding a modern enduro bike in the winter (on hardpacked to icy trails)? I know this video is from 2012 from before fat bikes were a big thing, but I don't really want to get a fat bike right now.

Depends on the trail conditions.

• Deep or soft snow: There's no substitute for fat tires.
• Hard packed snow: So much fun!
• Ice: Screws work great. Some friends of mine used to ride frozen rivers and creeks with fully studded (every lug) tires.

The homebrew method is to use screws with short, coarse threads and flat heads. Couple layers of fabric tape over the tire's casing and throw a tube in there.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 2:47 Quote
What canvas roll-out tool bag do you guys recommend?
Typically want to store basic tools (chain whip, 4-6mm t-handle hex, couple of screwdrivers, chainbreaker, couple of spanners, couple of pliers etc.). Any recommendations are welcome. Cheers

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 3:30 Quote
seraph wrote:
I know Hope makes SRAM compatible calipers for drop bar applications, but I haven't seen a mineral oil version.

RX4's should also work with Shimano levers as well (somehow)

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 5:25 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
coaster156 wrote:
So I just watched this video and am now curious about studding tires for mountain biking in the winter.

It is worth doing? I have extra tires lying around to put studs/screws into, but will I run into unforeseen issues with riding a modern enduro bike in the winter (on hardpacked to icy trails)? I know this video is from 2012 from before fat bikes were a big thing, but I don't really want to get a fat bike right now.

Depends on the trail conditions.

• Deep or soft snow: There's no substitute for fat tires.
• Hard packed snow: So much fun!
• Ice: Screws work great. Some friends of mine used to ride frozen rivers and creeks with fully studded (every lug) tires.

The homebrew method is to use screws with short, coarse threads and flat heads. Couple layers of fabric tape over the tire's casing and throw a tube in there.

Or save some weight and skip the layers of tape and the tube. Run them tubeless and add lots of sealant. The sealant will seal up all the screw holes. Have done this successfully with a few different tires. Another (much more expensive) option to the screws are grip studs that screw in from the outside. These are about $1 each though so gets expensive when you're using hundreds of them. I use grip studs in fat bike tires for winter riding, works great!

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 6:26 Quote
freerider11 wrote:
Or save some weight and skip the layers of tape and the tube. Run them tubeless and add lots of sealant. The sealant will seal up all the screw holes.

Ideally, yes, but I've seen cases where this hasn't worked. It can be frustrating trying to seal several hundred holes and sealant is frequently depleted with that many holes.

I agree externally mounted studs solve these problems, albeit at quite the price.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 6:36 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Ideally, yes, but I've seen cases where this hasn't worked. It can be frustrating trying to seal several hundred holes and sealant is frequently depleted with that many holes.

I agree externally mounted studs solve these problems, albeit at quite the price.

Worked great the couple times I've tried it, but you do need to use lots of sealant. IMO if your sealant won't seal up the interface between the screws and the rubber, then you need better sealant!

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 7:23 Quote
freerider11 wrote:
R-M-R wrote:
Ideally, yes, but I've seen cases where this hasn't worked. It can be frustrating trying to seal several hundred holes and sealant is frequently depleted with that many holes.

I agree externally mounted studs solve these problems, albeit at quite the price.

Worked great the couple times I've tried it, but you do need to use lots of sealant. IMO if your sealant won't seal up the interface between the screws and the rubber, then you need better sealant!

It's true, most sealants are trash, in my opinion. Anything that stays liquid for a long time won't seal and anything that seals quickly dries quickly.

I haven't owned a tubeless tire that's studded with screws, I've only assisted with the initial set-up - and clean-up! On my own tires, even a small hole that's been plugged will continuously weep while riding due to casing deformation. Does this not happen when long screws are pushed and sheared while riding?

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 7:28 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
It's true, most sealants are trash, in my opinion. Anything that stays liquid for a long time won't seal and anything that seals quickly dries quickly.

I haven't owned a tubeless tire that's studded with screws, I've only assisted with the initial set-up - and clean-up! On my own tires, even a small hole that's been plugged will continuously weep while riding due to casing deformation. Does this not happen when long screws are pushed and sheared while riding?

Been a few years since I've used screw tires, as I've been using the external grip studs (which are a way better solution), but the last set of tubeless screw tires I used stayed sealed up all winter long and rarely needed air, at least not much more than a regular tubeless setup. Results may very I suppose, but worked well for me.

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 7:45 Quote
freerider11 wrote:
Been a few years since I've used screw tires, as I've been using the external grip studs (which are a way better solution), but the last set of tubeless screw tires I used stayed sealed up all winter long and rarely needed air, at least not much more than a regular tubeless setup. Results may very I suppose, but worked well for me.

Good to know. Thanks!

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 12:44 Quote
Anyone have any positive or negative experiences with re-tapping pedal threads on crank arms.
One of my crank arms got stripped from a forced pedal install but my crank arms are still good, thoughts on re tapping the crank arm? Will it weaken the crank?

Posted: Oct 10, 2019 at 12:45 Quote
joeljohnson wrote:
Anyone have any positive or negative experiences with re-tapping pedal threads on crank arms.
One of my crank arms got stripped from a forced pedal install but my crank arms are still good, thoughts on re tapping the crank arm? Will it weaken the crank?
use a helicoil. Very common job. Cranks will be fine.


 
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.013694
Mobile Version of Website