Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]

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Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]
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Posted: Jan 20, 2020 at 23:05 Quote
chickenrunz wrote:
Tall7kiwi wrote:
coaster156 wrote:


The SLX is actually 46T (although it's listed as medium cage, which is curious).

And of course it'll work slightly above/below the listed range, it doesn't magically stop working at that number.

After researching this comment chain a bit further it's very confusing, but it seems like the original question is asking what cassette to run with a M6000 derailleur. See the second last post on this page.
Then traqs wrote he is running an 11 spd 11-50 cassette, which won't work with the M6000 (10 vs 11 spd).
At this point, everyone seems to have gotten confused and off track, as a bit of research on the original posters (chickenrunz) would reveal there are only medium cage options available for the M6000 (there are 2 variants, a SGS, with 36T max, and GS, with 42T max).

They could alternatively get a Sunrace CSMZ800 12 spd cassette (which will fit there existing freehub), and a 12 shifter/der (NX 12 spd). This would run them about $320 CAD, although just getting the Deore der and an 11-42 10 spd cassette would be cheaper.

Definitely seems like it regarding people going off topic...

I forgot to say that the SLX mech (M7000) 11spd only comes in GS like you mentioned. The SGS version of the M7000 mech is 10 spd only. Whereas the XT (M8000) 11spd comes in GS and SGS. Anyways. I ordered the SLX GS 11spd mech so fingers crossed the 11-50T cassette works lol.

Please let me know if it works. Interested to know

Hey. Just installed the Sunrace 11spd 50T cassette on my 2017 Remedy 7 and it is running flawlessly. I have the Shimano SLX 11spd GS (yes, the medium cage mech). I still have room left in the b-tension screw as well. Am planning on going for a ride tomorrow but so far it shifts amazingly.


Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 0:53 Quote
Tall7kiwi wrote:
chickenrunz wrote:
Tall7kiwi wrote:


Definitely seems like it regarding people going off topic...

I forgot to say that the SLX mech (M7000) 11spd only comes in GS like you mentioned. The SGS version of the M7000 mech is 10 spd only. Whereas the XT (M8000) 11spd comes in GS and SGS. Anyways. I ordered the SLX GS 11spd mech so fingers crossed the 11-50T cassette works lol.

Please let me know if it works. Interested to know

Hey. Just installed the Sunrace 11spd 50T cassette on my 2017 Remedy 7 and it is running flawlessly. I have the Shimano SLX 11spd GS (yes, the medium cage mech). I still have room left in the b-tension screw as well. Am planning on going for a ride tomorrow but so far it shifts amazingly.


thanks.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 8:47 Quote
I'm looking to buy a cheap pair of wet riding pants. Looking for something I can get at a Walmart/Target/Costco. I dont want t spend 100 on a pair of fox as Ill only use3 them a few times a year. Any recommendations?

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 9:16 Quote
Primo123 wrote:
I'm looking to buy a cheap pair of wet riding pants. Looking for something I can get at a Walmart/Target/Costco. I dont want t spend 100 on a pair of fox as Ill only use3 them a few times a year. Any recommendations?
yellow plastic rain pants.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 9:53 Quote
Got a bit sidetracked on the lastest cycling tips article on the homepage and stumbled across this quote in a SRAM Red eTap AXS review, and was wondering if anybody had any more insight into this. Is it because the greater angle between links causes more friction than the total amount of contact between the chain and the chainring/cassette?

And what about drivetrain efficiency? Previous testing by Friction Facts founder Jason Smith (who is now the chief technology officer at CeramicSpeed) has shown that, all else being equal, smaller chainrings and cassette sprockets generate more drivetrain friction than larger ones.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 10:18 Quote
coaster156 wrote:
Got a bit sidetracked on the lastest cycling tips article on the homepage and stumbled across this quote in a SRAM Red eTap AXS review, and was wondering if anybody had any more insight into this. Is it because the greater angle between links causes more friction than the total amount of contact between the chain and the chainring/cassette?

And what about drivetrain efficiency? Previous testing by Friction Facts founder Jason Smith (who is now the chief technology officer at CeramicSpeed) has shown that, all else being equal, smaller chainrings and cassette sprockets generate more drivetrain friction than larger ones.

Im not 100% sure (RMR should have a better answer soon enough) but i know ive heard from a few sources that using a larger chainring on many suspension designs is better for the drivetrain and reduces chain slap noise.
I would guess that a smaller chainring puts more strain on a drivetrain because youre spinning that much more (28t vs like a 34t) to go the same distance

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 10:44 Quote
sosburn wrote:
coaster156 wrote:
Got a bit sidetracked on the lastest cycling tips article on the homepage and stumbled across this quote in a SRAM Red eTap AXS review, and was wondering if anybody had any more insight into this. Is it because the greater angle between links causes more friction than the total amount of contact between the chain and the chainring/cassette?

And what about drivetrain efficiency? Previous testing by Friction Facts founder Jason Smith (who is now the chief technology officer at CeramicSpeed) has shown that, all else being equal, smaller chainrings and cassette sprockets generate more drivetrain friction than larger ones.

Im not 100% sure (RMR should have a better answer soon enough) but i know ive heard from a few sources that using a larger chainring on many suspension designs is better for the drivetrain and reduces chain slap noise.
I would guess that a smaller chainring puts more strain on a drivetrain because youre spinning that much more (28t vs like a 34t) to go the same distance

You're on the right track. I'm going to assume the rider is not spinning more, though. Other than when the rider runs out of low gears, the rider will choose the same ratio, regardless of the chainring size, by matching it to the cassette sprocket that produces the desired cadence.

With a smaller chainring:

• More chain tension for a given ratio. For example, you could use a 20T chainring and 20T cassette sprocket for a 1:1 ratio or a 40T & 40T. Same ratio, pretty much same everything, but the smaller set-up has twice the tension. This chain tension creates more pressure within the chain and against the sprockets. This pressure is more likely to break the film strength of the lubricant and exceed the strength of the materials, so the rate of wear may not be linear with the difference in tension.
• More chain flexing. Each link has to bend a little more to wrap around the tighter curvature of the smaller sprockets - and it's doing this bending under greater tension.
• More difficult to get the profiles exactly right. The chain links are likely to do a tiny bit more "wiggling / sliding into place" as they contact the sprockets.
• Closer proximity to the chainstay. A smaller chainring and smaller cassette sprocket lowers the upper run of the chain closer to the chainstay. The chain is more likely to slap the chainstay simply because it's closer.

Suspension effects are complicated. The increased tension in the chain creates more load in the pivots, but this should be small, compared to bump forces. The smaller chainring will increase pedaling anti-squat, which I often think is a good thing.

Advantages of the smaller chainring:

• Ground clearance.
• More useful ratios. Most people don't even use their 9, 10, or 11T cassette sprockets.
• Facilitates using a steel chainring. The weight spread between aluminum and steel is modest with small chainrings, so there's less downside to using a stronger, more durable, and more efficient steel chainring.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 10:44 Quote
sosburn wrote:
My float X2 started making squelching noises if not used for a bit, which apparently means air is leaking into the damper and it needs a servicing. Looks like servicing from Fox is about $150, but i was wondering if there are any other tuning companies that you guys would recommend? maybe Push or Vorsprungg....

Yup it needs a damper rebuild!

So there is Full Flow Suspension in Aubrun CA. That guy is legit ,and close by to you

Also Cascade Suspension Works in Ashland Oregon as well. He worked for Fox previously and teaches Fox certification classes at UBI

I would definitely give those guys my money instead of Fox directly...

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 10:45 Quote
Hello, I just bought a 1994 Alpinestars d735 frame and fork and will be running it 1x12 or 11. It has a 68mm BB and 135mm rear hub. If I run a 118 width ocatalink v1 BB (that's the triple chainring width bb since my bike ran a triple originally). I should be able to get my chainline right enough putting a narrow-wide ring on either the inner or outer position of the 2x crank I plan to purchase and get a good chainline right? Any insights would be very helpful. I understand that getting a square taper crank and BB would be the safest way to a perfect chainline, but I really want this specific crank. Thank you for your help!

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 10:52 Quote
Somason27 wrote:
Hello, I just bought a 1994 Alpinestars d735 frame and fork and will be running it 1x12 or 11. It has a 68mm BB and 135mm rear hub. If I run a 118 width ocatalink v1 BB (that's the triple chainring width bb since my bike ran a triple originally). I should be able to get my chainline right enough putting a narrow-wide ring on either the inner or outer position of the 2x crank I plan to purchase and get a good chainline right? Any insights would be very helpful. I understand that getting a square taper crank and BB would be the safest way to a perfect chainline, but I really want this specific crank. Thank you for your help!

Ooh, a chainline question! I get to give my rant!

First, chainline is not gospel!

1. The fact that three chainrings ever existed shows it's fine for a chainring to be misaligned with the centre of the cassette.
2. Recommended chainline is often not even centered over the cassette. It's often outboard to squeeze out a little more tire clearance, so it's usually fine to go narrower.
3. It's better to centre the chainring over the parts of the cassette you use most, rather than the true centre.

Additional reading here.

I suggest getting creative by using the narrowest BB spindle that still provides crank/frame clearance and mounting the chainring in the outer position. You'll get a narrower stance ("Q factor"), if you like that (I do), and the chainring will be more centered. You can use spacers to bring the chainring farther inboard, if needed.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 10:56 Quote
nubbs wrote:
sosburn wrote:
My float X2 started making squelching noises if not used for a bit, which apparently means air is leaking into the damper and it needs a servicing. Looks like servicing from Fox is about $150, but i was wondering if there are any other tuning companies that you guys would recommend? maybe Push or Vorsprungg....

Yup it needs a damper rebuild!

So there is Full Flow Suspension in Aubrun CA. That guy is legit ,and close by to you

Also Cascade Suspension Works in Ashland Oregon as well. He worked for Fox previously and teaches Fox certification classes at UBI

I would definitely give those guys my money instead of Fox directly...

Big shout out to Michael at Full Flow. Very good and super helpful. He's also one of Vorsprung's elite partner tuning shops.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 11:19 Quote
coaster156 wrote:
Got a bit sidetracked on the lastest cycling tips article on the homepage and stumbled across this quote in a SRAM Red eTap AXS review, and was wondering if anybody had any more insight into this. Is it because the greater angle between links causes more friction than the total amount of contact between the chain and the chainring/cassette?

And what about drivetrain efficiency? Previous testing by Friction Facts founder Jason Smith (who is now the chief technology officer at CeramicSpeed) has shown that, all else being equal, smaller chainrings and cassette sprockets generate more drivetrain friction than larger ones.

BMX racers have known this for years! More chain link/tooth interface means less stress on each interface an less friction for torque transfer also less chance of snapping a chain.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 11:41 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Somason27 wrote:
Hello, I just bought a 1994 Alpinestars d735 frame and fork and will be running it 1x12 or 11. It has a 68mm BB and 135mm rear hub. If I run a 118 width ocatalink v1 BB (that's the triple chainring width bb since my bike ran a triple originally). I should be able to get my chainline right enough putting a narrow-wide ring on either the inner or outer position of the 2x crank I plan to purchase and get a good chainline right? Any insights would be very helpful. I understand that getting a square taper crank and BB would be the safest way to a perfect chainline, but I really want this specific crank. Thank you for your help!

Ooh, a chainline question! I get to give my rant!

First, chainline is not gospel!

1. The fact that three chainrings ever existed shows it's fine for a chainring to be misaligned with the centre of the cassette.
2. Recommended chainline is often not even centered over the cassette. It's often outboard to squeeze out a little more tire clearance, so it's usually fine to go narrower.
3. It's better to centre the chainring over the parts of the cassette you use most, rather than the true centre.

Additional reading here.

I suggest getting creative by using the narrowest BB spindle that still provides crank/frame clearance and mounting the chainring in the outer position. You'll get a narrower stance ("Q factor"), if you like that (I do), and the chainring will be more centered. You can use spacers to bring the chainring farther inboard, if needed.

Thanks so much, this was very helpful! I'll give it a go and hope I can clear the 2.35" tires I plan to run on it! I'll try both BBs and see what works best, I'm sure I can get it sorted out... I'll post some pics of the bike when the build is done (probably around spring). Much obliged and have a good day!

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 11:49 Quote
Salute

Best of luck and looking forward to seeing an interesting retro build!

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 12:41 Quote
nubbs wrote:
sosburn wrote:
My float X2 started making squelching noises if not used for a bit, which apparently means air is leaking into the damper and it needs a servicing. Looks like servicing from Fox is about $150, but i was wondering if there are any other tuning companies that you guys would recommend? maybe Push or Vorsprungg....

Yup it needs a damper rebuild!

So there is Full Flow Suspension in Aubrun CA. That guy is legit ,and close by to you

Also Cascade Suspension Works in Ashland Oregon as well. He worked for Fox previously and teaches Fox certification classes at UBI

I would definitely give those guys my money instead of Fox directly...

Oh thats actually really awesome, i’ll be checking out full flow in that case. Fox already got enough of my money when i bought the thing lmao


 
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