Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]

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Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]
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Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 13:11 Quote
For future reference, routing a cable through is easier than trying to route a piece of housing. Gravity is your friend too.

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 13:28 Quote
riish wrote:
Having some problems with my M820 front brake.
Just put new pads and rotors on both ends last week, and bedded them in by slightly wetting the pads, rubbing them together, and then installing them and doing a series of hard stops without locking up the brake. However, it feels like I don’t have nearly as much power as they should. I’ve got a set of Zees on my hardtail that got new pads at the same time, they feel much more powerful and direct.

It’s not possible that the caliper is leaking, I cleaned it with isopropyl before installing the new pads, and it still looks really clean, no trace of mineral oil. Similarly, I don’t think it’s contaminated pads, as swapping them for the ones from the Zee front brake didn’t make any difference at all.

Could it be air in the caliper somewhere? It doesn’t feel spongy at the lever at all.

My code pads didn't bed in after a week of general trail riding, including a few hard stops on the flat. After that week I sent it down a few dh tracks and the brakes were spot on after 2 runs.

Give it a few days, then put some proper heat in them. If they still aren't up to scratch, somethings up

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 13:33 Quote
seraph wrote:
For future reference, routing a cable through is easier than trying to route a piece of housing. Gravity is your friend too.

also had success using a piece of floss tied to an old cable end (the cylindrical piece), along with gravity.

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 13:35 Quote
seraph wrote:
For future reference, routing a cable through is easier than trying to route a piece of housing. Gravity is your friend too.

thanks for the tip, i'm going to do that for dropper hosuing, it goes around bb and drives me nuts

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 13:45 Quote
worked like a charm thanks Salute

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 17:39 Quote
Noeserd wrote:
seraph wrote:
For future reference, routing a cable through is easier than trying to route a piece of housing. Gravity is your friend too.

thanks for the tip, i'm going to do that for dropper hosuing, it goes around bb and drives me nuts
Here's a tip that MIGHT work when you don't have internal routing channels.
It's a trick (only ONE version) that some of us luthiers use for wiring repairs on hollow bodies and arch tops.

Use the spool of twist-tie wire for gardening. Cut it to desired length and wrap or tie it around one end of a cable or wire. Since it's not "soft" like string, you can feed it through, bend it, shape it, direct it around corners and through holes. Once you get a grip on the "wire" end, pull any cable through. Works great, been using it for years.

~JSV

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 21:14 Quote
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
riish wrote:
Having some problems with my M820 front brake.
Just put new pads and rotors on both ends last week, and bedded them in by slightly wetting the pads, rubbing them together, and then installing them and doing a series of hard stops without locking up the brake. However, it feels like I don’t have nearly as much power as they should. I’ve got a set of Zees on my hardtail that got new pads at the same time, they feel much more powerful and direct.

It’s not possible that the caliper is leaking, I cleaned it with isopropyl before installing the new pads, and it still looks really clean, no trace of mineral oil. Similarly, I don’t think it’s contaminated pads, as swapping them for the ones from the Zee front brake didn’t make any difference at all.

Could it be air in the caliper somewhere? It doesn’t feel spongy at the lever at all.

My code pads didn't bed in after a week of general trail riding, including a few hard stops on the flat. After that week I sent it down a few dh tracks and the brakes were spot on after 2 runs.

Give it a few days, then put some proper heat in them. If they still aren't up to scratch, somethings up

I’ll give that a go, thanks!

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 21:19 Quote
Sorry I'm late but, for internal routing. Vacume cleaner and string. No need to disassemble anything an works in seconds

Posted: Jun 7, 2021 at 21:36 Quote
Rare earth magnets with steel cables work as well

Posted: Jun 8, 2021 at 2:45 Quote
Noeserd wrote:
seraph wrote:
For future reference, routing a cable through is easier than trying to route a piece of housing. Gravity is your friend too.

thanks for the tip, i'm going to do that for dropper hosuing, it goes around bb and drives me nuts

I tied a small washer to a piece of string dropped it down the seat tube untill it reached the BB shell. Did the same for the down tube an then tied the two pieces together at the BB, then used that to pull the inner cable all the way through. last step is feed the outer over the inner.
May have to fiddle the outer with a long screwdriver or similar when it reaches the corner at the BB.
If there's an exit/entry port (with no built in feed) then the vacume methood will get the string through every time

Posted: Jun 8, 2021 at 2:53 Quote
İt took me 4 min to route it with seraph's tactic, i built the bike last night Big Grin

Posted: Jun 8, 2021 at 9:28 Quote
Canabliss wrote:
Hi mechanics Wink come watch my juicy peach bounce! Trying to figure out a good way to film it on the trails

https://youtube.com/watch?v=sWVpfYg2yv4

every guy wishes he was that seat lol

Posted: Jun 8, 2021 at 10:50 Quote
riish wrote:
Having some problems with my M820 front brake.
Just put new pads and rotors on both ends last week, and bedded them in by slightly wetting the pads, rubbing them together, and then installing them and doing a series of hard stops without locking up the brake. However, it feels like I don’t have nearly as much power as they should. I’ve got a set of Zees on my hardtail that got new pads at the same time, they feel much more powerful and direct.

It’s not possible that the caliper is leaking, I cleaned it with isopropyl before installing the new pads, and it still looks really clean, no trace of mineral oil. Similarly, I don’t think it’s contaminated pads, as swapping them for the ones from the Zee front brake didn’t make any difference at all.

Could it be air in the caliper somewhere? It doesn’t feel spongy at the lever at all.
NOT a mechanic answering the question! Just sharing personal experience:

I've never heard of wetting the pads before bedding them? Unless there IS something to it that I was never aware of. In fact I've been told that the pads should be bone dry, sterilized the rotors, leave no residue, handle and install with gloves, and bed the new pads THAT way. I've done it like that with no issues and very strong braking.

If I'm correct here, I'd be suspicious that the pads being wet before bedding may be an issue? I think it depends too on what material the pads are? Let's see what someone with more expertise has to say.

~JSV

Posted: Jun 8, 2021 at 11:16 Quote
ScaryGuiTarS wrote:
riish wrote:
Having some problems with my M820 front brake.
Just put new pads and rotors on both ends last week, and bedded them in by slightly wetting the pads, rubbing them together, and then installing them and doing a series of hard stops without locking up the brake. However, it feels like I don’t have nearly as much power as they should. I’ve got a set of Zees on my hardtail that got new pads at the same time, they feel much more powerful and direct.

It’s not possible that the caliper is leaking, I cleaned it with isopropyl before installing the new pads, and it still looks really clean, no trace of mineral oil. Similarly, I don’t think it’s contaminated pads, as swapping them for the ones from the Zee front brake didn’t make any difference at all.

Could it be air in the caliper somewhere? It doesn’t feel spongy at the lever at all.
NOT a mechanic answering the question! Just sharing personal experience:

I've never heard of wetting the pads before bedding them? Unless there IS something to it that I was never aware of. In fact I've been told that the pads should be bone dry, sterilized the rotors, leave no residue, handle and install with gloves, and bed the new pads THAT way. I've done it like that with no issues and very strong braking.

If I'm correct here, I'd be suspicious that the pads being wet before bedding may be an issue? I think it depends too on what material the pads are? Let's see what someone with more expertise has to say.

~JSV

Mixed theory on bedding in pads. Always good to try and be extra clean and not touch the rotors braking surface or the braking material on the pads.

Some say to do a couple of hard stops then spray with water some say do it dry. I don't think it matters too much just make sure what your spraying them with is just water with no other contaminants.

Posted: Jun 8, 2021 at 11:24 Quote
Canabliss wrote:
cyberoptixs wrote:
Canabliss wrote:
Hi mechanics Wink come watch my juicy peach bounce! Trying to figure out a good way to film it on the trails

https://youtube.com/watch?v=sWVpfYg2yv4

every guy wishes he was that seat lol

Hahaha!
Love a good, bouncy ride

So...? Is this the new "seat fitting guide" which will be shown in bike shops everywhere?

~JSV


 
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