Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]

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Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]
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Posted: Nov 25, 2022 at 10:37 Quote
Anyone know if you can use any old hypodermic needle to bleed the nitrogen out of a piggy back coil shock? Specifically an ohlins ttx25 which is pretty much the same as the old cane creek DB. I'd rather not fork out for the fancy fill adaptor if I dont need to since I just need to purge the air out and will take it to a shop for a recharge

Proper tool is Cane Creek DBT016
(https://kaz-technologies.myshopify.com/collections/shock-tools/products/copy-of-gas-charging-tool-79-00)

Cheers

O+
Posted: Nov 25, 2022 at 14:18 Quote
james-skipper wrote:
Anyone know if you can use any old hypodermic needle to bleed the nitrogen out of a piggy back coil shock? Specifically an ohlins ttx25 which is pretty much the same as the old cane creek DB. I'd rather not fork out for the fancy fill adaptor if I dont need to since I just need to purge the air out and will take it to a shop for a recharge

Proper tool is Cane Creek DBT016
(https://kaz-technologies.myshopify.com/collections/shock-tools/products/copy-of-gas-charging-tool-79-00)

Cheers

Yes you can use a needle to bleed out the ifp charge to begin a service.

Posted: Nov 25, 2022 at 20:06 Quote
Hey guys. I was wondering your guys' experience with angle sets. I have an Evil Following and Im looking at getting a 1.5 degree angle set. The Following in the X-Low setting has a 66.4 degree HTA. How much of a difference would having a 65 degree HTA make on the downhills. I don't find the bike skittish or too steep but I feel like it could benefit from having a slacker HTA. Have any of you guys used an angle set on your bikes with a similar HTA to 66.5? Thanks!

Posted: Nov 26, 2022 at 0:33 Quote
Lion1 wrote:
Hey guys. I was wondering your guys' experience with angle sets. I have an Evil Following and Im looking at getting a 1.5 degree angle set. The Following in the X-Low setting has a 66.4 degree HTA. How much of a difference would having a 65 degree HTA make on the downhills. I don't find the bike skittish or too steep but I feel like it could benefit from having a slacker HTA. Have any of you guys used an angle set on your bikes with a similar HTA to 66.5? Thanks!

You say you don't find the bike skittish or too steep, but feel like it would benefit from a slacker HTA. Can you explain what it does do wrong that the angleset will fix? Not saying you are wrong, but just after what it is that you want the angleset to tune out.

Generally when talking to people about bike/suspension setup, I find the best way to approach it is to try and fix things you feel the bike is doing badly. I forever have people asking me if adding 2 clicks of lsc to their fork, or 3psi to their tyres or whatever will make it better. I always respond "hard to say, what issue are you attempting to dial out?"

Basically, fix the things that are broken, rather than trying to improve the things the bike is already good at. If the bike feels like the HTA is too steep, slacken it. If it doesn't feel too steep, slackening it might make it better, but it's more likely to just have no real noticeable effect. Spending the angleset money on a grippier front tyre or more powerful brakes might make a more noticeable improvement. It depends what your bikes weak points are.

Also, Re: anglesets. I had one in a DH bike a few years back. The CaneCreek gimbal style one. It did the job of slackening the HA (from 64 to 63) and noticeably stabilized the ride while introducing a little more understeer. It also creaked like a bastard if I hadn't stripped, cleaned and reassembled for a week or two. I eventually got so annoyed with it that I araldited the cups in place. This stopped the creaking for about a month, until I hit a tree hard enough to break the araldite, at which point the creak returned...

Posted: Nov 26, 2022 at 0:47 Quote
nubbs wrote:
james-skipper wrote:
Anyone know if you can use any old hypodermic needle to bleed the nitrogen out of a piggy back coil shock? Specifically an ohlins ttx25 which is pretty much the same as the old cane creek DB. I'd rather not fork out for the fancy fill adaptor if I dont need to since I just need to purge the air out and will take it to a shop for a recharge

Proper tool is Cane Creek DBT016
(https://kaz-technologies.myshopify.com/collections/shock-tools/products/copy-of-gas-charging-tool-79-00)

Cheers

Yes you can use a needle to bleed out the ifp charge to begin a service.

Yeah you can. Just don't use too long a needle or you risk puncturing the bladder. Especially if there is gas in the damping fluid, as this will expand when you depressurise the piggyback and push the bladder towards the needle. Also don't use too large a bore needle, or the puck won't make a good seal once the needle is removed.

I'm not sure what you mean by you "just need to purge the air out"? Do you have fresh fluid to put in the shock, and a method for getting it in there? The TTX is a rock solid little shock, probably the most durable on the market. If it's got gas in the damper, it's probably well overdue a complete overhaul. They basically don't go wrong unless there is an issue than needs sorting.

O+
Posted: Nov 26, 2022 at 8:01 Quote
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
nubbs wrote:
james-skipper wrote:
Anyone know if you can use any old hypodermic needle to bleed the nitrogen out of a piggy back coil shock? Specifically an ohlins ttx25 which is pretty much the same as the old cane creek DB. I'd rather not fork out for the fancy fill adaptor if I dont need to since I just need to purge the air out and will take it to a shop for a recharge

Proper tool is Cane Creek DBT016
(https://kaz-technologies.myshopify.com/collections/shock-tools/products/copy-of-gas-charging-tool-79-00)

Cheers

Yes you can use a needle to bleed out the ifp charge to begin a service.

Yeah you can. Just don't use too long a needle or you risk puncturing the bladder. Especially if there is gas in the damping fluid, as this will expand when you depressurise the piggyback and push the bladder towards the needle. Also don't use too large a bore needle, or the puck won't make a good seal once the needle is removed.

I'm not sure what you mean by you "just need to purge the air out"? Do you have fresh fluid to put in the shock, and a method for getting it in there? The TTX is a rock solid little shock, probably the most durable on the market. If it's got gas in the damper, it's probably well overdue a complete overhaul. They basically don't go wrong unless there is an issue than needs sorting.

Sounds like OP is trying to service at home then take damper to a place with nitrogen to finish the service and save money doing so.

Posted: Nov 27, 2022 at 1:07 Quote
nubbs wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
nubbs wrote:


Yes you can use a needle to bleed out the ifp charge to begin a service.

Yeah you can. Just don't use too long a needle or you risk puncturing the bladder. Especially if there is gas in the damping fluid, as this will expand when you depressurise the piggyback and push the bladder towards the needle. Also don't use too large a bore needle, or the puck won't make a good seal once the needle is removed.

I'm not sure what you mean by you "just need to purge the air out"? Do you have fresh fluid to put in the shock, and a method for getting it in there? The TTX is a rock solid little shock, probably the most durable on the market. If it's got gas in the damper, it's probably well overdue a complete overhaul. They basically don't go wrong unless there is an issue than needs sorting.

Sounds like OP is trying to service at home then take damper to a place with nitrogen to finish the service and save money doing so.

I figured it sounded more like they were gonna just try to top up the damper fluid, without doing any servicing. This probably isnt a great idea.

Posted: Nov 27, 2022 at 19:27 Quote
Howdy,

I've been trying to figure out if I can run two of the Sram Blip buttons in leu of a the AXS shifter.

I've seen a few photo's of pros who use the Blip button on the left side of their handle bar to control the dropper post but what I'd like to do is run a left side blip that controls all my up shifts and a right side blip that controls all my down shifts. I think that setup would look really clean if done right. Anyone have any thoughts/input?

O+
Posted: Nov 27, 2022 at 23:03 Quote
lindsayflowhan wrote:
Howdy,

I've been trying to figure out if I can run two of the Sram Blip buttons in leu of a the AXS shifter.

I've seen a few photo's of pros who use the Blip button on the left side of their handle bar to control the dropper post but what I'd like to do is run a left side blip that controls all my up shifts and a right side blip that controls all my down shifts. I think that setup would look really clean if done right. Anyone have any thoughts/input?

A guy I've raced with does this. He cut holes in push on grips for the buttons and it looks very slick

O+
Posted: Nov 29, 2022 at 20:18 Quote
Which category would the Banshee KS2 suspension fall in to for calculating spring rate?

Single pivot/dw link

4 bar/vpp

O+
Posted: Nov 29, 2022 at 21:27 Quote
Garradmiller wrote:
Which category would the Banshee KS2 suspension fall in to for calculating spring rate?

Single pivot/dw link

4 bar/vpp

KS2 is two small co-rotating links so most similar to dw. make sure you calculate based on banshee’s recommended sag tho

O+
Posted: Nov 29, 2022 at 21:44 Quote
newbermuda wrote:
Garradmiller wrote:
Which category would the Banshee KS2 suspension fall in to for calculating spring rate?

Single pivot/dw link

4 bar/vpp

KS2 is two small co-rotating links so most similar to dw. make sure you calculate based on banshee’s recommended sag tho

Yeah I wasn’t sure because it looks like a dw but saw it described as a short 4 bar also.

Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 3:10 Quote
Anyone know what crank spindle lenght I need for a 2015 Giant stp with 73mm shell? Couldnt find any info... Cheers!

Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 7:11 Quote
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
nubbs wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:


Yeah you can. Just don't use too long a needle or you risk puncturing the bladder. Especially if there is gas in the damping fluid, as this will expand when you depressurise the piggyback and push the bladder towards the needle. Also don't use too large a bore needle, or the puck won't make a good seal once the needle is removed.

I'm not sure what you mean by you "just need to purge the air out"? Do you have fresh fluid to put in the shock, and a method for getting it in there? The TTX is a rock solid little shock, probably the most durable on the market. If it's got gas in the damper, it's probably well overdue a complete overhaul. They basically don't go wrong unless there is an issue than needs sorting.

Sounds like OP is trying to service at home then take damper to a place with nitrogen to finish the service and save money doing so.

I figured it sounded more like they were gonna just try to top up the damper fluid, without doing any servicing. This probably isnt a great idea.

Sorry for the late reply! My fault for wording it poorly, when I said "purge the air out" I meant the Nitrogen from the near side of the IFP

Nubbs you're bang on, I need to save the money of getting it professionally serviced and will tear it all the way down and replace the oil and seals. At the minute I just need a means of emptying the nitrogen chamber so I can dissassemble everything - I'll still need to take it somewhere to get the nitrogen chamber repressurised

I've found this:
https://www.raymed.co.uk/collections/all-syringe-needle-combined/products/rays-inj-light-1ml-syringe-with-26g-hypodermic-needle

The above is a 0.45mm OD needle, does that sound about right? I've not done it before so havent got anything to compare to in my head

Reason for doing it is that its leaking pretty badly from the adjustors and hasnt had any love for 4/5 years

O+
Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 8:20 Quote
james-skipper wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
nubbs wrote:


Sounds like OP is trying to service at home then take damper to a place with nitrogen to finish the service and save money doing so.

I figured it sounded more like they were gonna just try to top up the damper fluid, without doing any servicing. This probably isnt a great idea.

Sorry for the late reply! My fault for wording it poorly, when I said "purge the air out" I meant the Nitrogen from the near side of the IFP

Nubbs you're bang on, I need to save the money of getting it professionally serviced and will tear it all the way down and replace the oil and seals. At the minute I just need a means of emptying the nitrogen chamber so I can dissassemble everything - I'll still need to take it somewhere to get the nitrogen chamber repressurised

I've found this:
https://www.raymed.co.uk/collections/all-syringe-needle-combined/products/rays-inj-light-1ml-syringe-with-26g-hypodermic-needle

The above is a 0.45mm OD needle, does that sound about right? I've not done it before so havent got anything to compare to in my head

Reason for doing it is that its leaking pretty badly from the adjustors and hasnt had any love for 4/5 years

That needle will work to purge IFP for sure.

FYI if the damper is overdue for service do inspect the damper shaft very closely under good lighting to look for wear/damage. Scoring from sealhead wear and rock damage etc. Depending on the bike/rider that damper could be pretty worn out by now.


 
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