Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]

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Mechanics Quick Question Thread [Ask Questions Here]
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Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 8:38 Quote
nubbs wrote:
That needle will work to purge IFP for sure.

FYI if the damper is overdue for service do inspect the damper shaft very closely under good lighting to look for wear/damage. Scoring from sealhead wear and rock damage etc. Depending on the bike/rider that damper could be pretty worn out by now.

Perfect, thanks very much

Its not seen too many actual hours of use despite its age but definately worth a good look like you say

Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 9:29 Quote
The shock doesnt use an IFP, it uses a bladder. The sealhead is a complete non-servicable unit, so you won't be able to replace any of the important seals. You will need specialist tools to gain access to the adjuster seals. You will struggle to source the correct fluids. Bleeding the shock is going to prove extremely difficult without a vacuum bleed machine.
I don't mean to sound too negative, but I'm not sure you are going to be saving yourself any money by trying to service it yourself. You are much more likely to cause yourself further expenses by attempting it without the tools, parts and service manual.

Of course, it is your own shock and you are free to do whatever you want, but there is a reason service centres charge the money they do. Id suggest just spend the £100 or so to get it serviced and live happy in the knowledge that it will be rock solid for a few more years. I fear that if you take it apart yourself, you will end up needing to buy a whole new shock a few weeks down the line.

Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 11:02 Quote
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
The shock doesnt use an IFP, it uses a bladder. The sealhead is a complete non-servicable unit, so you won't be able to replace any of the important seals. You will need specialist tools to gain access to the adjuster seals. You will struggle to source the correct fluids. Bleeding the shock is going to prove extremely difficult without a vacuum bleed machine.
I don't mean to sound too negative, but I'm not sure you are going to be saving yourself any money by trying to service it yourself. You are much more likely to cause yourself further expenses by attempting it without the tools, parts and service manual.

Of course, it is your own shock and you are free to do whatever you want, but there is a reason service centres charge the money they do. Id suggest just spend the £100 or so to get it serviced and live happy in the knowledge that it will be rock solid for a few more years. I fear that if you take it apart yourself, you will end up needing to buy a whole new shock a few weeks down the line.

I think we've got some wires crossed, I should have been clearer in my first post

Its an Ohlins TTX 25 MK2 FSAE which is broadly the same as a DB Coil, just adapted for motorsport (Not a TTX 22 which I think is where the confusion lies)


Heres a couple of Links:
https://www.ohlinsusa.com/files/files/TTX25%20MKII%20-%20Base%20Assembly%202014%20Service%20_rev12_Page_1.jpg

https://www.ohlinsusa.com/files/files/TTX25%20MKII%20-%20Base%20Assembly%202014%20Service%20_rev12_Page_2.jpg

https://www.ohlinsusa.com/files/files/WSM_TTX25_3.pdf

I fully understand whats involved in servicing and have made what few specific tools are required, literally just wanted to double check the requirements/spec of the needle to bleed the nitrogen chamber

I really do appreciate your help though!

O+
Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 11:39 Quote
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
The shock doesnt use an IFP, it uses a bladder. The sealhead is a complete non-servicable unit, so you won't be able to replace any of the important seals. You will need specialist tools to gain access to the adjuster seals. You will struggle to source the correct fluids. Bleeding the shock is going to prove extremely difficult without a vacuum bleed machine.
I don't mean to sound too negative, but I'm not sure you are going to be saving yourself any money by trying to service it yourself. You are much more likely to cause yourself further expenses by attempting it without the tools, parts and service manual.

Of course, it is your own shock and you are free to do whatever you want, but there is a reason service centres charge the money they do. Id suggest just spend the £100 or so to get it serviced and live happy in the knowledge that it will be rock solid for a few more years. I fear that if you take it apart yourself, you will end up needing to buy a whole new shock a few weeks down the line.

Ha. Yes that was a typo obviously.

I think the OP has it handled here..

Kind of a rude move to steer a rider away from learning about servicing their own suspension. But hey you seem to know it all they should send it to you!

Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 11:56 Quote
nubbs wrote:

Ha. Yes that was a typo obviously.

I think the OP has it handled here..

Kind of a rude move to steer a rider away from learning about servicing their own suspension. But hey you seem to know it all they should send it to you!

I don't mind a bit of robust back and forth! Just an honest misunderstanding me thinks

Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 14:55 Quote
I don't know if you've got someone in mind for the recharge, but I've used Suspension Inc. a few times and I've been very happy with the service. He's in Bargoed.

https://www.suspensioninc.co.uk/

Posted: Nov 30, 2022 at 15:36 Quote
commental wrote:
I don't know if you've got someone in mind for the recharge, but I've used Suspension Inc. a few times and I've been very happy with the service. He's in Bargoed.

https://www.suspensioninc.co.uk/

Was planning on ringing around to see what the usual suspects like sprung and jtech etc would quote - I'll definately give him a shout first since its so close though, thanks for the recommendation

Posted: Dec 1, 2022 at 2:28 Quote
james-skipper wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
The shock doesnt use an IFP, it uses a bladder. The sealhead is a complete non-servicable unit, so you won't be able to replace any of the important seals. You will need specialist tools to gain access to the adjuster seals. You will struggle to source the correct fluids. Bleeding the shock is going to prove extremely difficult without a vacuum bleed machine.
I don't mean to sound too negative, but I'm not sure you are going to be saving yourself any money by trying to service it yourself. You are much more likely to cause yourself further expenses by attempting it without the tools, parts and service manual.

Of course, it is your own shock and you are free to do whatever you want, but there is a reason service centres charge the money they do. Id suggest just spend the £100 or so to get it serviced and live happy in the knowledge that it will be rock solid for a few more years. I fear that if you take it apart yourself, you will end up needing to buy a whole new shock a few weeks down the line.

I think we've got some wires crossed, I should have been clearer in my first post

Its an Ohlins TTX 25 MK2 FSAE which is broadly the same as a DB Coil, just adapted for motorsport (Not a TTX 22 which I think is where the confusion lies)


Heres a couple of Links:
https://www.ohlinsusa.com/files/files/TTX25%20MKII%20-%20Base%20Assembly%202014%20Service%20_rev12_Page_1.jpg

https://www.ohlinsusa.com/files/files/TTX25%20MKII%20-%20Base%20Assembly%202014%20Service%20_rev12_Page_2.jpg

https://www.ohlinsusa.com/files/files/WSM_TTX25_3.pdf

I fully understand whats involved in servicing and have made what few specific tools are required, literally just wanted to double check the requirements/spec of the needle to bleed the nitrogen chamber

I really do appreciate your help though!

Ah I see! I had assumed you meant ttx22 and the 25 was just a typo as thats not an mtb shock. But yeah it sounds like you are prepped as far as tooling goes etc. I'm not intending to put you off servicing it, just warning of the pitfalls of going in blind. I've seen way too many totally mangled shocks from people who were trying to save a few quid, and ended up costing themselves ££££.

Posted: Dec 1, 2022 at 2:30 Quote
nubbs wrote:
gabriel-mission9 wrote:
The shock doesnt use an IFP, it uses a bladder. The sealhead is a complete non-servicable unit, so you won't be able to replace any of the important seals. You will need specialist tools to gain access to the adjuster seals. You will struggle to source the correct fluids. Bleeding the shock is going to prove extremely difficult without a vacuum bleed machine.
I don't mean to sound too negative, but I'm not sure you are going to be saving yourself any money by trying to service it yourself. You are much more likely to cause yourself further expenses by attempting it without the tools, parts and service manual.

Of course, it is your own shock and you are free to do whatever you want, but there is a reason service centres charge the money they do. Id suggest just spend the £100 or so to get it serviced and live happy in the knowledge that it will be rock solid for a few more years. I fear that if you take it apart yourself, you will end up needing to buy a whole new shock a few weeks down the line.

Ha. Yes that was a typo obviously.

I think the OP has it handled here..

Kind of a rude move to steer a rider away from learning about servicing their own suspension. But hey you seem to know it all they should send it to you!

People often get their knickers in a twist when I say what I think. I'm not being rude, I'm just saying the risks are high when taking apart a very expensive shock without the correct tooling or information. It's probably best to learn on something like a Rockshox, where the shocks themselves are relatively cheap, and service tooling and info is easily available. Ohlins is higher performance, but less accessible. Probably not the best first service.

Posted: Dec 1, 2022 at 16:42 Quote
I’ve serviced those FSAE shocks quite a few times (12 at a time, used to work on the FSAE team when I was at uni)

They’re relatively straightforward but require a few specialist tools.

O+
Posted: Dec 2, 2022 at 23:11 Quote
Have an is brake setup.
Wanting to run a 200mm rotor.
Have a +40 is to post adapter and a 20mm post to post
Any issue with stacking the two?

Posted: Dec 2, 2022 at 23:42 Quote
Garradmiller wrote:
Have an is brake setup.
Wanting to run a 200mm rotor.
Have a +40 is to post adapter and a 20mm post to post
Any issue with stacking the two?

Are you sure your frame is not limited to 180 mm ?

Posted: Dec 3, 2022 at 2:10 Quote
So the brake rotor size without any adapters is 140mm? Sounds like a road or maybe XC bike in that case.

Posted: Dec 3, 2022 at 3:23 Quote
140mm is standard for rear IS mounts. +60 is mount adaptors were not uncommon back in the day.

Technically there is no problem with stacking adaptors (although if you try and stack the ones that use 2 long bolts and cps washers rather than 4 bolts you will run into issues)

As alluded to above, you should definitely check the max rotor size your frame was design to accept. If it's not designed to cope with 200mm rotors, best case the rotor will rub the frame, worst case you will rip the dropout off of the frame under hard braking.

O+
Posted: Dec 3, 2022 at 6:55 Quote
Frame is not limited to 180mm

Yes 140mm without an adapter, it’s an enduro bike.

Yeah would use appropriate bolt lengths on all.

I was mainly concerned about the possibility of the angles of each not lining up correctly rather than strength.

I need to order new rotors so have the adapters but can’t verify right now.


 
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