Pig ugliest AM/Enduro/XC/DH bikes out there if yours is a pig post it!

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Pig ugliest AM/Enduro/XC/DH bikes out there if yours is a pig post it!
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Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 14:14 Quote
gnarnaimo wrote:
sosburn wrote:
gnarnaimo wrote:


Why do people ski high risk avalanche areas? It might not be right for you, but because somebody has a higher tolerance of risk than you doesn't make them wrong.
If your doing it for 'the gram' or for ego, maybe those aren't the right reasons. If you want to free dive or climb a cliff without a harness, that's awesome, I won't be joining. However a jump like this I do have some desire for, it really is a next level rush. That's me though, lots of people wouldn't even want to step close to the ramp.

I mean you do you but imo this spot is likely “for the gram” as its just a big jump, doesnt go anywhere, and is picturesque. sure you can get some rush but this definitely is something you could kill yourself on

Back country skiing could be looked at similarly, why do one short lap on much higher risk terrain for 'some rush' when it is definitely something you could kill yourself on, when you could ride resort terrain all day? For the gram is the only likely reason?
Theres a handful of road/large gaps I hit around home that don't go anywhere, are higher risk than anything on any local trails, and I love the rush I get hitting them. I only have a photo taken of me on one of them and that was when my photographer friend was tagging along and was stoked on it.

along with backcountry skiing, the same could be said about climbing Everest or K2, surfing mavericks, free soloing a 5.11, etc, why do something plenty of people have died trying when you could climb a safer mountain? I’d definitely consider climbing everest, while youd consider hitting that gap. Different levels of appeal for sure.

to be more clear, i dont think that ALL road gaps are too risky and therefore senseless to ride, theres one back home that i hit after a few run ins, and im not saying that the rush is totally senseless. But like cmon, its an already huge road gap with like a 60ft drop to ground if one little thing goes wrong. Good on ya if you do make it but that is going on my shortlist of “will never attempt”.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 14:15 Quote
dkidd wrote:
sosburn wrote:
dkidd wrote:

If you want a cool warm-up ride or two I can show you some cool local spots (5-10 miles) before you do some 30 mile epic.

I may be hitting you up for shorter rides and save the trans-cascadia stuff for later in the summer. I do 20 mile rides every weekend with a good amount of climbing, so the length isnt the scary part, more just riding alone out there haha
I'll take you on a 20 mile run that'll maximize fun.

Also interested in your take on riding near Vancouver, as UBC is on my shortlist of grad schools and squamish is like an hour away.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 14:36 Quote
sosburn wrote:
gnarnaimo wrote:
sosburn wrote:


I mean you do you but imo this spot is likely “for the gram” as its just a big jump, doesnt go anywhere, and is picturesque. sure you can get some rush but this definitely is something you could kill yourself on

Back country skiing could be looked at similarly, why do one short lap on much higher risk terrain for 'some rush' when it is definitely something you could kill yourself on, when you could ride resort terrain all day? For the gram is the only likely reason?
Theres a handful of road/large gaps I hit around home that don't go anywhere, are higher risk than anything on any local trails, and I love the rush I get hitting them. I only have a photo taken of me on one of them and that was when my photographer friend was tagging along and was stoked on it.

along with backcountry skiing, the same could be said about climbing Everest or K2, surfing mavericks, free soloing a 5.11, etc, why do something plenty of people have died trying when you could climb a safer mountain? I’d definitely consider climbing everest, while youd consider hitting that gap. Different levels of appeal for sure.

to be more clear, i dont think that ALL road gaps are too risky and therefore senseless to ride, theres one back home that i hit after a few run ins, and im not saying that the rush is totally senseless. But like cmon, its an already huge road gap with like a 60ft drop to ground if one little thing goes wrong. Good on ya if you do make it but that is going on my shortlist of “will never attempt”.

I get yah. That level of high consequence does raise the rush and appeal to some. To some, that's what it's all about.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 14:47 Quote
All the trails are still snowed over so I took a pedal up the Butte in the middle of town, got yelled at for riding directly down the side, here's the view.

Top of Pilot Butte

also found this killer band called the Viagra Boys

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 14:57 Quote
sosburn wrote:

along with backcountry skiing, the same could be said about climbing Everest or K2, surfing mavericks, free soloing a 5.11, etc, why do something plenty of people have died trying when you could climb a safer mountain? I’d definitely consider climbing everest, while youd consider hitting that gap. Different levels of appeal for sure.

You're actually talking about really different kinds of risk there. Manageable risk vs unmanageable risk. Also you have to realize the difference between DIFFICULTY, EXPOSURE, CONSEQUENCE, AND RISK. Kilian Jornet has a really good post about it

That gap has a high exposure, high consequence, but the difficulty really depends on your skill on going fast and staying stable in the air.

-Free soloing can be made incredibly safe if the level you're climbing at is very much within your skill level and you're on solid rock without danger of rockfall from above. I've been in more objective danger being belayed on a 5.10 than I have freesoloing some 5.7's. High consequence, but can be LOW difficulty...kinda like driving

-Backcountry skiing can be just as safe as skiing in the resort. Or you can take usually safe, easy terrain and just by having a different snowpack it can kill you easily. Can be high or low consequence, can be high or low exposure, difficulty can be high or low

-The main danger of the majority* of Everest climbs is weather which can be somewhat unpredictable at those elevations but with modern forecasting that risk aspect has been really reduced. The other main ones are icefall and being held up by other parties. Now if you're talking about climbing without supplemental oxygen your fitness level becomes a huge part of the danger equation. Or climbing new routes then there is tons of other ones. Mostly low skill difficulty, can be done low consequence

-Surfing Mav's is actually the most risky activity you've called out. Every single wave is different so just catching the wave is somewhat of a roll of the dice. Then if you go down you have blunt force trama or drowning (from having your leash caught underwater, or being knocked out, multi wave hold down). High difficulty, high exposure, high consequence

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 15:11 Quote
NorCalNomad wrote:
sosburn wrote:

along with backcountry skiing, the same could be said about climbing Everest or K2, surfing mavericks, free soloing a 5.11, etc, why do something plenty of people have died trying when you could climb a safer mountain? I’d definitely consider climbing everest, while youd consider hitting that gap. Different levels of appeal for sure.

You're actually talking about really different kinds of risk there. Manageable risk vs unmanageable risk. Also you have to realize the difference between DIFFICULTY, EXPOSURE, CONSEQUENCE, AND RISK. Kilian Jornet has a really good post about it

-Free soloing can be made incredibly safe if the level you're climbing at is very much within your skill level and you're on solid rock without danger of rockfall from above. I've been in more objective danger being belayed on a 5.10 than I have freesoloing some 5.7's. High consequence, but can be LOW difficulty...kinda like driving

-Backcountry skiing can be just as safe as skiing in the resort. Or you can take usually safe, easy terrain and just by having a different snowpack it can kill you easily. Can be high or low consequence, can be high or low exposure, difficulty can be high or low

-The main danger of the majority* of Everest climbs is weather which can be somewhat unpredictable at those elevations but with modern forecasting that risk aspect has been really reduced. The other main ones are icefall and being held up by other parties. Now if you're talking about climbing without supplemental oxygen your fitness level becomes a huge part of the danger equation. Or climbing new routes then there is tons of other ones. Mostly low skill difficulty, can be done low consequence

-Surfing Mav's is actually the most risky activity you've called out. Every single wave is different so just catching the wave is somewhat of a roll of the dice. Then if you go down you have blunt force trama or drowning (from having your leash caught underwater, or being knocked out, multi wave hold down). High difficulty, high exposure, high consequence

Interesting. I was mostly just aiming to speak comparatively, so i wonder where that road gap would fall in this list. probably high consequence, definitely high exposure, not sure on difficulty.
I have actually surfed mavs a handful of times on smaller 20-25ft days as i was trying to make the left work, but i have since given up. the right is definitely too sketchy for me to attempt on my backhand, and 25ft is really pushing the upper limit for me.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 15:26 Quote
I was specifically referring to the backcountry skiers who choose to ski avalanche terrain even if it is high risk when I was comparing back country skiing.

Posted: Jan 21, 2020 at 16:19 Quote
sosburn wrote:
dkidd wrote:
sosburn wrote:


I may be hitting you up for shorter rides and save the trans-cascadia stuff for later in the summer. I do 20 mile rides every weekend with a good amount of climbing, so the length isnt the scary part, more just riding alone out there haha
I'll take you on a 20 mile run that'll maximize fun.

Also interested in your take on riding near Vancouver, as UBC is on my shortlist of grad schools and squamish is like an hour away.

Cool! Well honestly theres so much good riding there, generally you just choose your riding area based on time of day (and thus traffic), theres always something wicked to ride. Shoot me a PM and I can give you some more in depth suggestions!

Posted: Jan 22, 2020 at 5:02 Quote
I bring to you a new dilemma I have, I want to become a good listener, not just someone that sits and eats up all of someone's stuff.

Like when you meet someone that's charismatic and makes you feel welcome instsntly, when you leave said person you think "well gawddamn das a cool dude" I've been told I come off as arrogant sometimes and I want to improve on that

Posted: Jan 22, 2020 at 5:07 Quote
Here's a trick, shut your face and nod. Offer no opinion unless explicitly asked for, even then contain the sarcasm and "humor".

Posted: Jan 22, 2020 at 5:45 Quote
Dumb down the conversation, so everybody feel they can participate.
That'll give you a huge following of people of lesser intelligence, and with time you may even be able to use said horde, to scare off the triple digit IQ people on your way.
That way you can in the end avoid any stimulation, and simply switch off your brain.

Or you can keep things as they are, and stick to dealing with people you feel on par with, whom I doubt will consider you arrogant.

Magura Smile

Posted: Jan 22, 2020 at 5:46 Quote
Mr-Magura wrote:
Dumb down the conversation, so everybody feel they can participate.
That'll give you a huge following of people of lesser intelligence, and with time you may even be able to use said horde, to scare off the triple digit IQ people on your way.
That way you can in the end avoid any stimulation, and simply switch off your brain.

Or you can keep things as they are, and stick to dealing with people you feel on par with, whom I doubt will consider you arrogant.

Magura Smile
that is a good advice

Although the horde seems tempting

Posted: Jan 22, 2020 at 7:00 Quote
Jesp, you can search for answers for your life issues on the interwebs all day and get peoples opinions. Or you can see a counselor, which it sounds like you could take full advantage of.

Posted: Jan 22, 2020 at 8:11 Quote
gnarnaimo wrote:
Jesp, you can search for answers for your life issues on the interwebs all day and get peoples opinions. Or you can see a counselor, which it sounds like you could take full advantage of.
It is more of a chat with people with greater experience than me in life, I've been bullshitting with these guys since 2012 on this particular thread and I consider them really close to me as I've posted most of by day to day bullshit here.

With that being said, and I think this is because I don't post as often here anymore, these guys know that you have to take what I say with a pinch of salt so that's why most of their "advice" has comedic value, and a but of common sense


 
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