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Pig ugliest AM/Enduro/XC/DH bikes out there if yours is a pig post it!
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Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 6:44 Quote
its-chris wrote:
Between unsolicited boob pics, or friend wanting to bang and another camping trip planed with this other girl... I feel proud of me....

But right now I feel like a poisoned dog .... it f*cking sucks

It's Jesp mk2

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 6:57 Quote
deli-hustler wrote:
its-chris wrote:
Between unsolicited boob pics, or friend wanting to bang and another camping trip planed with this other girl... I feel proud of me....

But right now I feel like a poisoned dog .... it f*cking sucks

It's Jesp mk2
Hopefully with less drunken escapades gone wrong, and more hot Latinas. Because, have you seen the talent coming from Latina America lately?

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 7:05 Quote
deli-hustler wrote:
its-chris wrote:
Between unsolicited boob pics, or friend wanting to bang and another camping trip planed with this other girl... I feel proud of me....

But right now I feel like a poisoned dog .... it f*cking sucks

It's Jesp mk2

Is it?? Because I’m getting lucky haha

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 9:55 Quote
tom666 wrote:
Wale wrote:
Sorry for going back to the economy topic. I didn't read all the comments cause they were long as hell but the one that said 1000$ should be handed to every citizen.

First of all, to be able to hand this kind of money straight to everyone's pockets we would have to give up public health care, social services and basically everything that is organized by the state or municipalities (as they organize most of the services in Finland). This though is just a matter of an opinion as we can see comparing countries. Still, after this, I doubt we'd be able to share 1000$ per capita even with the high taxation in Finland.

And second, if we were able to hand in the 1000$, how would this affect the regional prices? Such a positive shock in demand would lead to higher price level. So about in a couple years your real income would be pretty much the same as it was before, and you wouldn't have public healthcare anymore. It will boost the economy in the short run but in the medium run the output of the economy returns to it's natural level of output, just with higher prices.


I listened to the podcast today while on a ride. It was a really thought provoking and fun to listen to.

First thing I want to point out that Andrew Yang is a politician, not an economist which means that no matter what, his views will be biased. Also the topic is very US-centric and might not apply to other states as such.

One thing I noticed is that he talks alot about people, especially truck drivers, losing there jobs because of robots. And that is the basic reason for universal basic income. He talks about people spending more money which creates more jobs but doesn't say which kind of jobs the demand creates. Can these truck drivers and job assistants etc be employed to these jobs? I think that there is no way around the fact that some people will need re-educating to be able to get back in the job market.

Also he talks about how men and women react to losing their job. He says that men tend to act self destructively and women are more adaptable. Still getting 1000$ a month won't fix that. It is not a job. There's research showing that even if a person receives 90% unemployment benefit of his income, it will significantly lower his/her quality of life. So it's not about the money, it's about the job.

As I already stated before, you have to take in the account the fact that if you hand people free money, it's gonna raise the price level in the medium run. There is no way around this fact and the technology won't be able to keep up to make up for the higher income. The only way to have higher GDP per capita in a country that is in the long run steady state, is with technology development. It kinda bugs me that he doesn't talk at all about prices (quite understandable as he is a politician and only wants to tell his side of the story).

In fact there is empirical evidence from such actions. When Finnish government raises the level of housing benefits it has straight effects on the price level of rental apartments.

In the end he talks alot about college and student loans. After quick Googling the average student dent in US is 37,000$. That is huge! If we compare that to the 7,000€ in Finland. He also talks about how college should not be free and he would rather put more effort into tech schools an such. What if it was all free?

That's just what I think and this podcast is all the knowledge I have about this idea and my knowledge is just based on under grad macro econ.

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 10:09 Quote
marxthekittah wrote:
deli-hustler wrote:
its-chris wrote:
Between unsolicited boob pics, or friend wanting to bang and another camping trip planed with this other girl... I feel proud of me....

But right now I feel like a poisoned dog .... it f*cking sucks

It's Jesp mk2
Hopefully with less drunken escapades gone wrong, and more hot Latinas. Because, have you seen the talent coming from Latina America lately?

No I haven't because I don't look.

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 15:21 Quote
its-chris wrote:
deli-hustler wrote:
its-chris wrote:
Between unsolicited boob pics, or friend wanting to bang and another camping trip planed with this other girl... I feel proud of me....

But right now I feel like a poisoned dog .... it f*cking sucks

It's Jesp mk2

Is it?? Because I’m getting lucky haha
well I usually black out before putting my peepee in

Posted: Apr 1, 2020 at 17:00 Quote
Wale wrote:

I listened to the podcast today while on a ride. It was a really thought provoking and fun to listen to.

First thing I want to point out that Andrew Yang is a politician, not an economist which means that no matter what, his views will be biased. Also the topic is very US-centric and might not apply to other states as such.

One thing I noticed is that he talks alot about people, especially truck drivers, losing there jobs because of robots. And that is the basic reason for universal basic income. He talks about people spending more money which creates more jobs but doesn't say which kind of jobs the demand creates. Can these truck drivers and job assistants etc be employed to these jobs? I think that there is no way around the fact that some people will need re-educating to be able to get back in the job market.

Also he talks about how men and women react to losing their job. He says that men tend to act self destructively and women are more adaptable. Still getting 1000$ a month won't fix that. It is not a job. There's research showing that even if a person receives 90% unemployment benefit of his income, it will significantly lower his/her quality of life. So it's not about the money, it's about the job.

As I already stated before, you have to take in the account the fact that if you hand people free money, it's gonna raise the price level in the medium run. There is no way around this fact and the technology won't be able to keep up to make up for the higher income. The only way to have higher GDP per capita in a country that is in the long run steady state, is with technology development. It kinda bugs me that he doesn't talk at all about prices (quite understandable as he is a politician and only wants to tell his side of the story).

In fact there is empirical evidence from such actions. When Finnish government raises the level of housing benefits it has straight effects on the price level of rental apartments.

In the end he talks alot about college and student loans. After quick Googling the average student dent in US is 37,000$. That is huge! If we compare that to the 7,000€ in Finland. He also talks about how college should not be free and he would rather put more effort into tech schools an such. What if it was all free?

That's just what I think and this podcast is all the knowledge I have about this idea and my knowledge is just based on under grad macro econ.

Glad you enjoyed it. I think it's super interesting too.

I feel like it's gotten construed somehow that I'm a huge proponent of this idea and that I think it will work right now with no side effects and it will all be great. It's definitely going to have problems, perhaps there's even fatal issues, but then our current way of doing things has a tonne of problems, look at the economy right now and how many people are losing their jobs and struggling. Basically I just think it's super interesting concept. It's an idea for how we might do things differently in the future and it has a lot of potential to fix problems we're seeing. I don't say for sure it's how things will be or should be or even that it will work. It's just an interesting idea and I enjoy talking about how it might work.

I think the prices of some things will increase for sure, particularly luxuries like meals out and starbucks - if people can charge more for those kinds of services they probably will. But like you say it already happens - when the minimum wage goes up, or when housing benefit is increased, so do private rents. Because the market is competitive though, supermarkets and sites like amazon are still going to try to sell cheaply and try to be the cheapest, even if people have more money. Most countries do make some effort too to make essential items affordable, so there's still potential your $1000 could go a long way, particularly if rent is controlled like it is in Germany and many other places.

US college is a strange one. Ivy League schools and other private universities are unbelievably expensive (like huge money), but state colleges are much cheaper (Universities subsidised by the state that they're located in). The US also tends to include a lot of stuff in their quoted cost of university that we wouldn't in Europe. For example you'll see a stat that says the average cost per year of a 4-year degree at a state college in the US is $25,290 - but that is broken down like so:

Tuition $9,970
Room and Board $10,800
Books and Supplies $1,120
Transportation $1,170
Other Expenses $2,100

I feel like your 7000EUR for Finland doesn't include all of that? That's tuition only? In the UK all Universities are fixed at £9,000 tuition per year - super shitty universities and some of the best universities in the world (Oxford, Cambridge and Imperial) are all the same price. Living cost is on top and living cost varies massively by city.

If we assume we're talking about state college and we're using the figures above. You could get your tuition on a student loan (and worry about it later), get your $12,000 UBI to help pay your living costs and then maybe you work 2-3 months over summer (say doing an internship or working at a summer camp like a lot of students do) to make some extra money - that would work okay. If you worked a little bit part time through most of the acedemic year (say 10-15 hours a week) you could probably graduate nearly debt free - so I don't think he's too far off. No chance it would work for Ivy League schools though. If you want to go to one of those your parents have to start saving the moment you are born, or you've got to cripple yourself with student loans.

Another angle on the same thing, in the UK way too many people go to University. People who are not smart go there and do some bullshit subject and come out with a degree. It devalues having a degree and it also isn't useful the people that get those degrees, people know they're bullshit. They'd be far better off doing a shorter, less expensive course that actually gets them a skill that they can use to make money.

About the truck drivers - I agree retraining may be needed so they can do the jobs created by UBI, but I think there's a critical difference between needing retraining to do a different but similarly skilled job, versus needing a trucker who may not even have a high school diploma, to learn to perform a skilled technician job. I'm sure some can, but I think it's unlikely too many truckers are going to suddenly start learning code.

Posted: Apr 2, 2020 at 0:58 Quote
It's definitely an interesting subject but not as simple as Yang makes it sound.

Tuition fees for Finland's citizens in Universities are about 50€/year. The student loan is basically for living. What's great about the student loan in Finland is that the interest rates are very low, just like for housing. Interest rates currently are 0.5% + 3 or 12 month Euribor which make is 0.2% at the time. The maximum amount for a year is about 5800€ and it's backed by the state. Also if you graduate on time the state will pay for part of your loan

With a quick googling the interest rates in US for under grad student loans are about 4.5% so there is a huge difference in that too.

The people in Finland are most definitely over educated too. The norm here when you go to a university is do both bachelor's and master's unlike in most countries where you might not do master's at all or do it after working for a few years.

There are colleges (or universities of applied science as they call them) in Finland where you can get only bachelor's but in the universities it's always bachelor's and master's with a couple exception.

Posted: Apr 2, 2020 at 2:49 Quote
Finland is definitely a good country to study in. Scandinavians do education very well I think and so do the Swiss.


In the UK there is an absolutely wild difference between good and bad state schools and our private school industry is very big. We have a significant amount of people paying £10-30k a year per child to out them through private schools.


When you multiply this through by 7-10 years (from age 8 or 11 through to 18 years old) it's absurd that people pay it.


Our student loans system is completely retarded. I don't even want to talk about it.

Posted: Apr 2, 2020 at 3:33 Quote
I completely agree that too many people go to university in the UK. Out of my school year of some 180 people I was one of maybe 5 to not go to uni I think. One of those joined the RAF and the other is doing sailing. I can think of 3 people who got apprenticeships after sixth form and it wasn’t even publicised by the school that it was an option. (This was a grammar school so that might impact it) I feel like there is an expectation for people to go to uni.

In contrast I got an apprenticeship at massive firm in London, do the same work and qualifications as the grads I joined with and I will be paid the same about 3 years in. Why people do not go for apprenticeships baffles me.

Posted: Apr 2, 2020 at 5:55 Quote
tom666 wrote:
Finland is definitely a good country to study in. Scandinavians do education very well I think and so do the Swiss.

Well you can't get in a school with money here. You have to know something. For example I have taken the entrance exam for law school 3 times now and I would considere myself as a fairly smart person.

Posted: Apr 2, 2020 at 7:58 Quote
Wale wrote:
tom666 wrote:
Finland is definitely a good country to study in. Scandinavians do education very well I think and so do the Swiss.

Well you can't get in a school with money here. You have to know something. For example I have taken the entrance exam for law school 3 times now and I would considere myself as a fairly smart person.

So, it's not a WALK in the park, is it

Posted: Apr 2, 2020 at 8:29 Quote
SileTzar wrote:
Wale wrote:
tom666 wrote:
Finland is definitely a good country to study in. Scandinavians do education very well I think and so do the Swiss.

Well you can't get in a school with money here. You have to know something. For example I have taken the entrance exam for law school 3 times now and I would considere myself as a fairly smart person.

So, it's not a WALK in the park, is it
classic

Posted: Apr 3, 2020 at 2:32 Quote
How does one remove the "Polls" notification left from the "Dashboard" menu. The yellow color is distracting me everytime

Posted: Apr 3, 2020 at 2:44 Quote
Take 5mins and click them all


 
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