Evil Owners Club

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Evil Owners Club
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Posted: Nov 25, 2020 at 22:59 Quote
monsieurgage wrote:
So good to hear. Have you tried the stock 29er set up? Did you not like the big wheels? I have been on a 2019 reign (27.5) and it felt really forgiving but also ground huggy and not as willing to become air born as much as I like. I only have tried the 2017 spartan and it felt pretty similar to my jeffsy.

I have a YT Jeffsy (27.5) now and it works well in most situations but the 67 degree HTA, relatively short wheelbase, and super flexy pike means that on the steepest and roughest trails (any double black darkside pretty much) it starts to fall apart. Literally actually, the frame has cracked! The poor trail bike also weighs probably close to 40 pounds between DH tires, cushcore, float X2, saints on 203 F/R rotors, big pedals, and heavy rims/onyx hubs. Hence why I am looking at the V3 wrecker.

I am not all at afraid of a heavy or inefficient climber. I figure it only makes me stronger.

Question, do you have an North Shore (NS) rack? does the wrecker fit? if not how did you bend the horns of the NS rack to fir the head tube of the wrecker?

Anyone have any news on bearing creak in the many linkage bolts of their evil bikes? Is this a bolt check pre-ride for EVERY ride kinda bike?

I've tried 29ers in the past, my choice for 27 is partly because I am on the smaller side, and prefer the maneuverability over the better bump rollover.

One other thing about the wrecker is that even though its a carbon frame, its not a whole lot lighter than an alloy frame. You can hear it in areas of stress, how thick the carbon is. Definitely a frame that does not compromise on strength.

I have my build at about 29.5lbs, I could have gone lighter if I went with carbon rims but I thought the tradeoff of cost vs weight was not substantial enough. And if I end up bending a rim I can replace it for under a hundred bucks.

As far as on racks, I don't have a n-shore rack but I measured my HT and the bottom widest part is 85mm wide and the top widest part of the HT was 63mm.

My frame bearings are definitely at the end of there life, but I have never experienced creaking. The only issue I had was the top shock bolt kept backing out for a good while, I ended up degreasing it best I could and using blue locktite and it hasn't budged since. I checked all the frame bolts regularly for the first few rides and only the top shock bolt was an issue, but as it is now nothing has backed out. I think the most important thing is to make sure the frame bolt threads don't have any sort of lubricant on them as well as them all being torqued to spec.

Posted: Nov 25, 2020 at 23:22 Quote
[Quote="Xeneo"]
monsieurgage wrote:
So ...spec.

Thanks for all the input Xeneo!

Group question. I have heard some stories of shimano shitting the bed on the XT brakes (Kaz on PB mostly). Local shop in North Van like the new XT but does anyone else here have issues with wandering bite point or any other issues?

I am wondering if I should keep the saints I currently have and move them over to the new bike when it arrives over keeping the XTs?

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 6:09 Quote
Xeneo wrote:
One other thing about the wrecker is that even though its a carbon frame, its not a whole lot lighter than an alloy frame. You can hear it in areas of stress, how thick the carbon is. Definitely a frame that does not compromise on strength.

I went from a wreckoning lb to an aluminum frame and the weight difference was not noticeable. im not really a weight weenie but that kinda surprised me

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 7:23 Quote
monsieurgage wrote:

Are you worries about flex in the post given the return to a smaller diameter insert or just not having the optimal length for seat drop?

Flex and bushing wear. Though One Up are really good about warranty and product development, so maybe a non-issue.

And all Shimano brakes have a wandering bite point, all. The newest stuff is supposed to be less dramatic than the older stuff. For example, the Saints and XTs of the previous gen have a pretty dramatic change in bite point from immediate to super low. The newer gen is supposed to slowly back out as you ride.
I 've ridden lots of Shimano brakes in the past, and I can attest to the wandering bite point experience. Not fun. I haven't been on the newer gen stuff though.
If you like Shimano power, the Hayes Dominions are the right route. They are the best brake I've ever ridden. I'm on Codes now, simply due to parts availability.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 12:47 Quote
[Quote="Abacall"]
monsieurgage wrote:

Are you... availability.

Hmmm I went from:
1) guide RS: spongey feel, fade, need to reef on it to exert power, and poorly constructed with wobbly lever blade, pistons get stuck
then
2) code R: spongey feel, good power but still more grip strength required to attain said power, poor construction with wobble in lever blade, pistons gets stuck
then
3) saints: excellent build quality, minor wander in bit point (rear only) but after a funnel only bleed, two firm pumps on the rear brake and the bite point is set, needs just the lightest touch for power, modulates super well as long as you have good fine motor skills and do not over brake or panic brake.

Even if I don't pump before dropping the bite point returns to the farthest position as the servo wave gets going and I don't notice it. The lever never get closer than 2-2.5cm from my grips before full power with how I set my lever throw.

So far Shimano is so much easier to bleed, mineral oil is not as toxic or corrosive, and even a shit 10min bleed job with funnel gets me as good a result as a perfect dual syringe precise 1 hour bleed job with sram

So if your saying saints have substantial bite point wandering then I probably wont care about the new stuff if the issue is at all addressed. I hear the new xt has almost as much power as the 820 saints, I wonder if that is true?


@Abacall this could be an issue, smaller diameter post and slack STA. I am lucky to live 45 min away from squam and Oneup pretty much does next day delivery for parts.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 13:18 Quote
I’ve ridden most brake and landed at magura mt7’s. Best bite and modulation on the market. Like every other company learning the bleed procedure takes a moment but Magura’s have a much better life between bleeds. It’s all personal preference though. Initial bite versus modulation is truly individual and style of riding specific.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 14:20 Quote
Petiloi wrote:
I’ve ridden.... specific.

I am afraid of any brand that is not well stocked in the LBS. I would love to try hope, magura, trickstuff, or even TRP and I can't even find TRP in the shops which is tektro and I think they are one of the worlds largest brake manufacturers.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 14:48 Quote
Petiloi wrote:
I’ve ridden most brake and landed at magura mt7’s. Best bite and modulation on the market. Like every other company learning the bleed procedure takes a moment but Magura’s have a much better life between bleeds. It’s all personal preference though. Initial bite versus modulation is truly individual and style of riding specific.

How long have you had them w/o issues?

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 15:21 Quote
I've used magura before. From my experience they have one of the highest raw stopping power with a very aggressive bite point. I find they are one of the harder brakes to get it set up perfectly, but when setup correctly there basically maintenance free (magnetic pads are a nice touch).

For a tighter budget the MT Trail Sports offer a really good weight and performance to cost ratio and I found them to be really reliable.

Im currently running TRP Quadiem DH and having used magura mt6's and Sram Guides, they are by far my favorite. The bite point is very consistent and they have excellent stopping power. From my experience they have very slightly more modulation then shimano, but by no means have the spongy feel of SRAM brakes. The quality is definitely premium with ceramic pistons and cnc'd stainless with titanium hardware.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 15:47 Quote
Petiloi wrote:
It’s all personal preference though. Initial bite versus modulation is truly individual and style of riding specific.

This is so true, ive always felt like brakes are as personal as grips, saddle, pedals, etc.

I have saints but ive been wanting to try the Hayes Dominion

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 15:55 Quote
Not sure if any of you have tried Formula Cura 4 Piston brakes but I have been extremely impressed. Great modulation and power. They are also ambidextrous, which is quite cool.

Would recommend to anyone looking for some quality brakes.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 15:56 Quote
I hated my maguras. Way too much stopping power for me, and adjusting them were a nightmare.

Love my Hopes though. Perfect adjustments and just the right amount of stopping power and bite.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 16:04 Quote
Xeneo wrote:
I've used.... hardware.

Ill second that actually. GF has them and they feel solid. I like that they can use shimano pads and mineral oil too. Does anyone else know why more companies do not place the lever throw adjustment knob behind and protected by the lever? Seems to be the only rational place to put a small fragile knob

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 16:08 Quote
wllmd wrote:
Petiloi wrote:
I’ve ridden most brake and landed at magura mt7’s. Best bite and modulation on the market. Like every other company learning the bleed procedure takes a moment but Magura’s have a much better life between bleeds. It’s all personal preference though. Initial bite versus modulation is truly individual and style of riding specific.

How long have you had them w/o issues?

I’ve been riding them 6 plus months on this set and I’ve only done the initial bleed.

Posted: Nov 26, 2020 at 16:14 Quote
Xeneo wrote:
I've used magura before. From my experience they have one of the highest raw stopping power with a very aggressive bite point. I find they are one of the harder brakes to get it set up perfectly, but when setup correctly there basically maintenance free (magnetic pads are a nice touch).

For a tighter budget the MT Trail Sports offer a really good weight and performance to cost ratio and I found them to be really reliable.

Im currently running TRP Quadiem DH and having used magura mt6's and Sram Guides, they are by far my favorite. The bite point is very consistent and they have excellent stopping power. From my experience they have very slightly more modulation then shimano, but by no means have the spongy feel of SRAM brakes. The quality is definitely premium with ceramic pistons and cnc'd stainless with titanium hardware.


I would completely agree with the stopping power comment but would add that the modulation is on point. As with the areas I ride I find that over 3000+ of daily descending on janky rutted rooty trails the maguras vs any other brakes I have run leave me with no arm pump. More bite and stopping power turns into less pressure applied to slow or skid out my back tire over and over again.


 
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