YT Capra Owners

Author Message
Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 13:18 Quote
chize wrote:
brassinne wrote:
endlessblockades wrote:


Perhaps. The seizing issue was a result of a lever design problem (in heat/direct sunlight), not the caliper. I'd force the pistons back in and give it another go if the OP hasn't already tried that. I'd be very surprised if SRAM was still having that problem. Speaking of levers, every time I walk by my TUES, I reach out and touch the TRP Quadien levers. So solid feeling and clean looking. Kinda fond of them. Got them a year ago at this Black Friday and they've never needed any attention.
I had this issue with mine. Only on the rear. What I was able to determine was that when thw bike was built up, they bled the brakes with the pistons already set. Meaning they were not pushed back in. I was not able to compress the pistons into the caliper. So, I opened up the bleed ports with both syringes attached, compressed to caliper pistons, set the bleed block into the caliper and gave them a good bleed. I did also lubricate the pistons with brake fluid prior to compression. Needless to say, after that my rear brakes weren't "draggy" anymore, all four pistons now have pretty equal protrusion and the lever feels more solid. Just like the front brake.
Don't lubricate the pistons on new codes with brake fluid. According to SRAMs factory master tech they should be cleared with isopropyl alcohol and allowed to air dry or dried with compressed air before being pushed back in, they are designed to run dry.

Can you link me the source of this info?

I've always lubricated my pistons (on new Codes and Hopes) with dot5.1 and it made the movement of pistons smoother and more in sync. Personally it makes more sense to run lubed than dry so there is less friction otherwise you'll wear out the seals quicker (which also should be lubed)

From 3:00 - 3:40
https://youtu.be/Ihb2cBiXp2U?t=182

Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 13:31 Quote
endlessblockades wrote:


Perhaps. The seizing issue was a result of a lever design problem (in heat/direct sunlight), not the caliper. I'd force the pistons back in and give it another go if the OP hasn't already tried that. I'd be very surprised if SRAM was still having that problem. Speaking of levers, every time I walk by my TUES, I reach out and touch the TRP Quadien levers. So solid feeling and clean looking. Kinda fond of them. Got them a year ago at this Black Friday and they've never needed any attention.

I have a set of Quadiems I got for super cheap from a friend off his Tues. Cant wait to get them out on. The problem is that they are going on a giant trance instead of my capra 29 AL. This is why I hate internal routing. I'm not sure how I'll like them and I don't want to have to deal with bleeding multiple sets o brakes to test them out on the capra first. I suppose ill get to know them on the trance and think about swapping in the spring.

Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 14:10 Quote
tkdbboy wrote:
chize wrote:
brassinne wrote:

I had this issue with mine. Only on the rear. What I was able to determine was that when thw bike was built up, they bled the brakes with the pistons already set. Meaning they were not pushed back in. I was not able to compress the pistons into the caliper. So, I opened up the bleed ports with both syringes attached, compressed to caliper pistons, set the bleed block into the caliper and gave them a good bleed. I did also lubricate the pistons with brake fluid prior to compression. Needless to say, after that my rear brakes weren't "draggy" anymore, all four pistons now have pretty equal protrusion and the lever feels more solid. Just like the front brake.
Don't lubricate the pistons on new codes with brake fluid. According to SRAMs factory master tech they should be cleared with isopropyl alcohol and allowed to air dry or dried with compressed air before being pushed back in, they are designed to run dry.

Can you link me the source of this info?

I've always lubricated my pistons (on new Codes and Hopes) with dot5.1 and it made the movement of pistons smoother and more in sync. Personally it makes more sense to run lubed than dry so there is less friction otherwise you'll wear out the seals quicker (which also should be lubed)

From 3:00 - 3:40
https://youtu.be/Ihb2cBiXp2U?t=182

The official manual says you should lubricate the pistons with dot fluid(page 13).

Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 16:15 Quote
coaster156 wrote:
tkdbboy wrote:
chize wrote:

Don't lubricate the pistons on new codes with brake fluid. According to SRAMs factory master tech they should be cleared with isopropyl alcohol and allowed to air dry or dried with compressed air before being pushed back in, they are designed to run dry.

Can you link me the source of this info?

I've always lubricated my pistons (on new Codes and Hopes) with dot5.1 and it made the movement of pistons smoother and more in sync. Personally it makes more sense to run lubed than dry so there is less friction otherwise you'll wear out the seals quicker (which also should be lubed)

From 3:00 - 3:40
https://youtu.be/Ihb2cBiXp2U?t=182

The official manual says you should lubricate the pistons with dot fluid(page 13).
Or pee on them. That works also.

Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 18:36 Quote
tkdbboy wrote:
chize wrote:
brassinne wrote:

I had this issue with mine. Only on the rear. What I was able to determine was that when thw bike was built up, they bled the brakes with the pistons already set. Meaning they were not pushed back in. I was not able to compress the pistons into the caliper. So, I opened up the bleed ports with both syringes attached, compressed to caliper pistons, set the bleed block into the caliper and gave them a good bleed. I did also lubricate the pistons with brake fluid prior to compression. Needless to say, after that my rear brakes weren't "draggy" anymore, all four pistons now have pretty equal protrusion and the lever feels more solid. Just like the front brake.
Don't lubricate the pistons on new codes with brake fluid. According to SRAMs factory master tech they should be cleared with isopropyl alcohol and allowed to air dry or dried with compressed air before being pushed back in, they are designed to run dry.

Can you link me the source of this info?

I've always lubricated my pistons (on new Codes and Hopes) with dot5.1 and it made the movement of pistons smoother and more in sync. Personally it makes more sense to run lubed than dry so there is less friction otherwise you'll wear out the seals quicker (which also should be lubed)

From 3:00 - 3:40
https://youtu.be/Ihb2cBiXp2U?t=182
I don't have a link, the sram service truck was at an event I went to and I stopped by to ask the mechanic about why my pistons weren't retracting properly, I mentioned that I had cleaned them and put dot 5.1 on to try and get them working properly and he told me the pistons in the codes are supposed to be dry and they just clean and dry them. the link you posted is for guides maybe those are different?

Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 18:50 Quote
chize wrote:
tkdbboy wrote:
chize wrote:

Don't lubricate the pistons on new codes with brake fluid. According to SRAMs factory master tech they should be cleared with isopropyl alcohol and allowed to air dry or dried with compressed air before being pushed back in, they are designed to run dry.

Can you link me the source of this info?

I've always lubricated my pistons (on new Codes and Hopes) with dot5.1 and it made the movement of pistons smoother and more in sync. Personally it makes more sense to run lubed than dry so there is less friction otherwise you'll wear out the seals quicker (which also should be lubed)

From 3:00 - 3:40
https://youtu.be/Ihb2cBiXp2U?t=182
I don't have a link, the sram service truck was at an event I went to and I stopped by to ask the mechanic about why my pistons weren't retracting properly, I mentioned that I had cleaned them and put dot 5.1 on to try and get them working properly and he told me the pistons in the codes are supposed to be dry and they just clean and dry them. the link you posted is for guides maybe those are different?
*Checks first page of link*
*Says it's for SRAM 2018-2019 Codes*
*???*

Posted: Nov 26, 2019 at 18:54 Quote
coaster156 wrote:
chize wrote:
tkdbboy wrote:


Can you link me the source of this info?

I've always lubricated my pistons (on new Codes and Hopes) with dot5.1 and it made the movement of pistons smoother and more in sync. Personally it makes more sense to run lubed than dry so there is less friction otherwise you'll wear out the seals quicker (which also should be lubed)

From 3:00 - 3:40
https://youtu.be/Ihb2cBiXp2U?t=182
I don't have a link, the sram service truck was at an event I went to and I stopped by to ask the mechanic about why my pistons weren't retracting properly, I mentioned that I had cleaned them and put dot 5.1 on to try and get them working properly and he told me the pistons in the codes are supposed to be dry and they just clean and dry them. the link you posted is for guides maybe those are different?
*Checks first page of link*
*Says it's for SRAM 2018-2019 Codes*
*???*
I was looking at the YouTube link, didn't see the service manual till after I posted

Posted: Nov 29, 2019 at 16:42 Quote
Hey guys, I have a yt capra 2018 27,5 and I want to know if a 250x75 mm can fit. Help please!

Posted: Dec 1, 2019 at 17:58 Quote
LouisDR wrote:
Hey guys, I have a yt capra 2018 27,5 and I want to know if a 250x75 mm can fit. Help please!
Yes it can.
250x70 and 250x75 have the same size.
You will have 10mm more travel with a 250x75.

You don't need to buy a new shock.
Those 250x70mm versions using travel reducing spacers.
Get rid of the spacer and your shock will have that sweet 75mm strock.

Posted: Dec 2, 2019 at 21:01 Quote
Yep, I just had my suspension tech cut the 5mm travel reducer out of my stock Super Deluxe.


OneTrustMan wrote:
LouisDR wrote:
Hey guys, I have a yt capra 2018 27,5 and I want to know if a 250x75 mm can fit. Help please!
Yes it can.
250x70 and 250x75 have the same size.
You will have 10mm more travel with a 250x75.

You don't need to buy a new shock.
Those 250x70mm version using travel reducing spacers.
Get rid if the spacer and your shock will have that sweet 75mm strock.

Posted: Dec 2, 2019 at 22:13 Quote
Yeah, not very hard to do.

Posted: Dec 3, 2019 at 5:13 Quote
Anyone removed the spacer in the float x2?

Posted: Dec 3, 2019 at 5:32 Quote
Jibbaman28 wrote:
Anyone removed the spacer in the float x2?
As much as I know, Fox uses one metal spacer instead of two plastic spacers like Rock Shox.

Posted: Dec 3, 2019 at 7:56 Quote
If there any advantages of having that metal spacer ? Or is it only used to reduce the rear travel ?

Posted: Dec 3, 2019 at 9:49 Quote
QuebecPoulin wrote:
If there any advantages of having that metal spacer ? Or is it only used to reduce the rear travel ?
I don't know.
But who cares. You have to get rid of it if you want more travel anyway.


 
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