The 100% Trek Slash forum: Posts, Comments, Questions and More.

PB Forum :: All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country
The 100% Trek Slash forum: Posts, Comments, Questions and More.
Author Message
Posted: May 20, 2019 at 14:04 Quote
jezzah wrote:
jarrod801 wrote:
jarrod801 wrote:

me too, should be getting them any day. Im trying a fox sls spring too. They were $35. so cool guys that are fast at answering questions

the shock fit thank GOD! the bushings were great and came with extra sleeves for them. Now time to ride and see how it feels
new fox on trek with custom bushings

Glad to hear you got them and it's all running well! Smile

Jeron @ Offsetbushings.com
@ Jeron, thx again this was a life saver and saved me from having to get a different bike!!!!

Posted: May 20, 2019 at 14:06 Quote
jarrod801 wrote:
Big-J wrote:
jarrod801 wrote:



I heard about them from PB user jezzah, i think runs www.offsetbushings.com. will probably have it built next week if all parts arrive on time. I am mounting a fox van RC with a sls spring for my style of riding. I got a deal i couldnt pass up. I would consider a DHX x2 but I couldnt do it due to just buying a dirt bike.

Yeah stoked to see if this works out. How much for the bushings?
me too, should be getting them any day. Im trying a fox sls spring too. They were $35. so cool guys that are fast at answering questions

I actually sold my downhill bike so I am throwing all my cards on the table and getting the push 11-6. But I also plan on not replacing my bike for years to come.

Posted: May 20, 2019 at 14:21 Quote
camelkicker wrote:
jarrod801 wrote:
Big-J wrote:


Yeah stoked to see if this works out. How much for the bushings?
me too, should be getting them any day. Im trying a fox sls spring too. They were $35. so cool guys that are fast at answering questions

I actually sold my downhill bike so I am throwing all my cards on the table and getting the push 11-6. But I also plan on not replacing my bike for years to come.

I did the same and sold my dh. my trek can do it all.

Posted: May 20, 2019 at 17:30 Quote
StumpyJR wrote:
BrianRichards wrote:
StumpyJR wrote:

Your going to bottom out more with a coil than air, keep that in mind. Although high speed compression helps, its just the linear nature of coils. I do love the way mine rides with the cane creek db coil.

i feel like i because it is more linear the lower sag wont be an issue because it will reach a higher final pressure, hence more force to bottom out. do you find that your coil bottoms out more than the air shock?

Yes, it does bottom out more than air. The coil is awesome for rough, fast tech. What its not for is trying to send the biggest drops you can.

shame... i guess its the sacrifice of stability when taking big hits for traction over loose, if only i could afford a push 11-6

Posted: May 21, 2019 at 7:35 Quote
BrianRichards wrote:
StumpyJR wrote:
BrianRichards wrote:


i feel like i because it is more linear the lower sag wont be an issue because it will reach a higher final pressure, hence more force to bottom out. do you find that your coil bottoms out more than the air shock?

Yes, it does bottom out more than air. The coil is awesome for rough, fast tech. What its not for is trying to send the biggest drops you can.

shame... i guess its the sacrifice of stability when taking big hits for traction over loose, if only i could afford a push 11-6
Ive never had an issue bottoming out any coil (fox, ccdb, dvo) I am 200 lb and never liked any air shock. I like mine at 20-25 % sag and ride stiffer then most for the fork and shock and it still feels plush to me. an SLS spring is lighter then TI and comes in 25 lb increments so its easy to get the one you want. Also, each bike has a different geo and so you want to ask the shock manufacturer which spring for your bike is best for your style. just my $ .02. I love my sls spring alot more then my monarch that I was stuck with because of the 8.25 x 2.25 odd size

Posted: May 21, 2019 at 15:49 Quote
So I have a 2018 Trek Slash with a crack on the bottom of my top tube(carbon). Trek has officially refused to warranty the frame claiming it had been clamped, thus voiding the warranty I guess. This bike has had helicopter tape put on the bike since it came out of the box, I built it myself and have worked as a bike mechanic for 3 years. The bike sat in a (car)bike rack that held it by the top tube once, and never once did it ever emit enough force for me to even entertain the idea that a frame meant for enduro racing could be compromised. But nonetheless Trek's technically right. They did not however include any empirical evidence to support their conclusion or any evidence or reasoning at all whatsoever, only an explanation reminiscent of a parent saying "because I said so". This will be the last Trek I ever buy, or promote in the Trek/Specialized dealer I work for. What I would love to know though is 1) How did they come to a conclusion of top tube clamping and why did they not provide evidence to support their conclusion. 2) What kind of literature does Trek provide to warn customers of improper handling?( I built the bike out of the box myself and may have missed or overlooked something) 3) This bike was built to be an enduro race weapon but the top tube seems to have the structural integrity of a tin can, if the amount of force I generated was enough to compromise the frame than what is it's limit? This wasnt clamped down upon by say a park tool bike stand, but by a foot wide grooved for frames to sit in bike rack that had rubber padding and emitted a similar amount of pressure as a spring clamp. I will add pictures and would love to hear of any information other Slash owners have come accross.

Posted: May 21, 2019 at 15:56 Quote
Dirtybreadbaker wrote:
So I have a 2018 Trek Slash with a crack on the bottom of my top tube(carbon). Trek has officially refused to warranty the frame claiming it had been clamped, thus voiding the warranty I guess. This bike has had helicopter tape put on the bike since it came out of the box, I built it myself and have worked as a bike mechanic for 3 years. The bike sat in a (car)bike rack that held it by the top tube once, and never once did it ever emit enough force for me to even entertain the idea that a frame meant for enduro racing could be compromised. But nonetheless Trek's technically right. They did not however include any empirical evidence to support their conclusion or any evidence or reasoning at all whatsoever, only an explanation reminiscent of a parent saying "because I said so". This will be the last Trek I ever buy, or promote in the Trek/Specialized dealer I work for. What I would love to know though is 1) How did they come to a conclusion of top tube clamping and why did they not provide evidence to support their conclusion. 2) What kind of literature does Trek provide to warn customers of improper handling?( I built the bike out of the box myself and may have missed or overlooked something) 3) This bike was built to be an enduro race weapon but the top tube seems to have the structural integrity of a tin can, if the amount of force I generated was enough to compromise the frame than what is it's limit? This wasnt clamped down upon by say a park tool bike stand, but by a foot wide grooved for frames to sit in bike rack that had rubber padding and emitted a similar amount of pressure as a spring clamp. I will add pictures and would love to hear of any information other Slash owners have come accross.

Did you just send pictures or send the frame to trek? Because if it was just pictures it would be easy for them to say it was a result of clamping because thats common. From what I know if you send trek the frame they will examine it for manufacturers defect, if it is manufacture defect they should send you a new frame, and if it is a result of clamping on the frame (which it doesn’t sound like) they should provide proper evidence. Sorry about the cracked frame, man that blows :/

Posted: May 21, 2019 at 16:05 Quote
Just pictures, when I can figure out how to upload pictures Ill repost the same ones I sent to them.

Posted: May 21, 2019 at 16:59 Quote
Yea as I was saying if you send pictures of a crack on the top tube they will most likely say it was from clamping. Maybe if you ship the frame, and they inspect it they will see it wasn’t from clamping?

Posted: May 22, 2019 at 1:21 Quote
OK another post about shocks, i checked the ifp pressure on my thru shaft shock and it was at 57psi, i have now inflated it to 190 psi, i couldnt go any higher because my shock pump (rs digital pump) loses too mach air when i take off the hose

i believe that the change in ifp pressure should help with bottom outs. i hope this fixes my problem, my megneg air chamber is already on the way though. so ill see what makes the biggest difference.

Posted: May 22, 2019 at 6:58 Quote
Dirtybreadbaker wrote:
So I have a 2018 Trek Slash with a crack on the bottom of my top tube(carbon). Trek has officially refused to warranty the frame claiming it had been clamped, thus voiding the warranty I guess. This bike has had helicopter tape put on the bike since it came out of the box, I built it myself and have worked as a bike mechanic for 3 years. The bike sat in a (car)bike rack that held it by the top tube once, and never once did it ever emit enough force for me to even entertain the idea that a frame meant for enduro racing could be compromised. But nonetheless Trek's technically right. They did not however include any empirical evidence to support their conclusion or any evidence or reasoning at all whatsoever, only an explanation reminiscent of a parent saying "because I said so". This will be the last Trek I ever buy, or promote in the Trek/Specialized dealer I work for. What I would love to know though is 1) How did they come to a conclusion of top tube clamping and why did they not provide evidence to support their conclusion. 2) What kind of literature does Trek provide to warn customers of improper handling?( I built the bike out of the box myself and may have missed or overlooked something) 3) This bike was built to be an enduro race weapon but the top tube seems to have the structural integrity of a tin can, if the amount of force I generated was enough to compromise the frame than what is it's limit? This wasnt clamped down upon by say a park tool bike stand, but by a foot wide grooved for frames to sit in bike rack that had rubber padding and emitted a similar amount of pressure as a spring clamp. I will add pictures and would love to hear of any information other Slash owners have come accross.


so i snapped the chainstay on my slash around the bearing shell where the seatstay and chainstay meet. I didn't find Trek very good with the warranty but eventually did get a new frame out of it from them (as they didn't have a colour matched chainstay). I did post the bike back to them in the end.

I would suggest sending it back if you can. Make it clear you work for a trek dealer and this has a direct impact on you recommending their products going forward.

Posted: May 22, 2019 at 9:53 Quote
Thanks for the help guys, Ive absolutely loved the bike and riding experience up to this point. Im going to mail Trek the bike and if replacement is an option Ill go for the alloy model. All other components except the frame performed and remain flawless for what its worth.

Posted: May 22, 2019 at 10:01 Quote
Dirtybreadbaker wrote:
Thanks for the help guys, Ive absolutely loved the bike and riding experience up to this point. Im going to mail Trek the bike and if replacement is an option Ill go for the alloy model. All other components except the frame performed and remain flawless for what its worth.

I believe if they warranty the frame it will be carbon. I’m not sure you will have an option to choose alu .. but you might, who knows

Posted: May 22, 2019 at 10:47 Quote
Hi, I'm curious if anyone has had a 2018 Slash with the rear ABP bearings not seating entirely into the frame? I was getting a very inconsistent creak in the rear of my bike, never being able to find the source. Finally, I was getting the ABP bolts tightened down with a Trek mechanic told me that this was a manufacture defect.

If you've had this issue I'm just curious what the solution from Trek was. Thanks!

Posted: May 22, 2019 at 12:34 Quote
Z I've seen plenty of frames - not just slashes but anything with ABP - do this.

I'd expect the shop to try and loctite the bearing back into the bore, but this should be a simple warranty claim and a replacement chainstay.

Assuming you are the original owner.


 
Your subscriptions
no posts

Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.032339
Mobile Version of Website