The 100% Trek Slash forum: Posts, Comments, Questions and More.

PB Forum :: All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country
The 100% Trek Slash forum: Posts, Comments, Questions and More.
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Posted: May 22, 2019 at 18:23 Quote
Dirtybreadbaker wrote:
So I have a 2018 Trek Slash with a crack on the bottom of my top tube(carbon). Trek has officially refused to warranty the frame claiming it had been clamped, thus voiding the warranty I guess. This bike has had helicopter tape put on the bike since it came out of the box, I built it myself and have worked as a bike mechanic for 3 years. The bike sat in a (car)bike rack that held it by the top tube once, and never once did it ever emit enough force for me to even entertain the idea that a frame meant for enduro racing could be compromised. But nonetheless Trek's technically right. They did not however include any empirical evidence to support their conclusion or any evidence or reasoning at all whatsoever, only an explanation reminiscent of a parent saying "because I said so". This will be the last Trek I ever buy, or promote in the Trek/Specialized dealer I work for. What I would love to know though is 1) How did they come to a conclusion of top tube clamping and why did they not provide evidence to support their conclusion. 2) What kind of literature does Trek provide to warn customers of improper handling?( I built the bike out of the box myself and may have missed or overlooked something) 3) This bike was built to be an enduro race weapon but the top tube seems to have the structural integrity of a tin can, if the amount of force I generated was enough to compromise the frame than what is it's limit? This wasnt clamped down upon by say a park tool bike stand, but by a foot wide grooved for frames to sit in bike rack that had rubber padding and emitted a similar amount of pressure as a spring clamp. I will add pictures and would love to hear of any information other Slash owners have come accross.

You should know how to handle this if you work at a shop. Your a dealer and mechanic, Send the frame to them for a evaluation, DONE.

PS don't use shitty bike racks. Clamping a 30+ lbs bike from the top tube puts a lot of stress on the bike, especially on the back of a moving car bouncing around, The though makes me sick. lol

Good luck. I bet you send it in to them and get a new frame...…...

Posted: May 23, 2019 at 15:36 Quote
Z, my buddy bought the same bike, and I have one as well. I have had no issues with mine but his bearing kept creeping out as well. After looking up the schematics for the bike, he found that there was a washer missing from the factory that is supposed to be behing the bearing. Id start by taking it to a trek dealer and have them compare the bike to the schematic to see if a part is missing.

Posted: May 23, 2019 at 16:08 Quote
Youre right Dave, Im also new to the warranty process and first went through the steps of filling a claim, adding more pictures for evaluation and was denied. I 1000% wanted to send the frame from the get go but without approval from Trek they deny the package so it gets returned. What bothered me was a lack of conversation as to why they came to the conclusion they did. They have caught wind of my frustration and are now offering me to send in the frame for evaluation. If it gets sent back and I hear it was my fault than so be it, Ill gladly pay the shipping both ways, if Im at fault. What I need to hear though is an explanation. Yes a bad bike rack is never optimal, which is why I dont have it anymore. However a bike rack designed to carry bikes breaking a bike is suspicious unless there are strict instructions that come with the bike stating it can only be moved with a tray style rack or the top tube can only withstand forces from a certain direction and will fail indefinitely if acted up in another. I find it hard to believe Trek would make an enduro bike with a top tube that can only withstand horizontal forces because the first person to to fall on, kick, strap, or come in contact with the top tube in any manner would have the same result. Obviously you cant hammer away at your top tube with lateral forces all day but one would expect there is a threshold of tolerance. As a mechanic I understand things go wrong and mistakes can be made, but there is always an explanation to how and why. If there is no understanding of either there can be no progress to prevent future mishaps.

Posted: May 23, 2019 at 19:11 Quote
nouseforaname wrote:
Z I've seen plenty of frames - not just slashes but anything with ABP - do this.

I'd expect the shop to try and loctite the bearing back into the bore, but this should be a simple warranty claim and a replacement chainstay.

Assuming you are the original owner.

I believe they shop will be working on new stays. I am the original owner, for just over a year now. I just found out this was an issue. Thanks for the insight!

Posted: May 23, 2019 at 19:13 Quote
Dirtybreadbaker wrote:
Z, my buddy bought the same bike, and I have one as well. I have had no issues with mine but his bearing kept creeping out as well. After looking up the schematics for the bike, he found that there was a washer missing from the factory that is supposed to be behing the bearing. Id start by taking it to a trek dealer and have them compare the bike to the schematic to see if a part is missing.

Did this happen to cause creaking sound in the rear, since I assume stays were rubbing together or more flexing occurs? I have an incurable creak but it comes and goes very sporadically.

Posted: May 24, 2019 at 4:25 Quote
ZSchnei wrote:
Dirtybreadbaker wrote:
Z, my buddy bought the same bike, and I have one as well. I have had no issues with mine but his bearing kept creeping out as well. After looking up the schematics for the bike, he found that there was a washer missing from the factory that is supposed to be behing the bearing. Id start by taking it to a trek dealer and have them compare the bike to the schematic to see if a part is missing.

Did this happen to cause creaking sound in the rear, since I assume stays were rubbing together or more flexing occurs? I have an incurable creak but it comes and goes very sporadically.

I find my creak comes for the mino links coming slightly loose.

Posted: May 24, 2019 at 4:44 Quote
talkingspoon wrote:
ZSchnei wrote:
Dirtybreadbaker wrote:
Z, my buddy bought the same bike, and I have one as well. I have had no issues with mine but his bearing kept creeping out as well. After looking up the schematics for the bike, he found that there was a washer missing from the factory that is supposed to be behing the bearing. Id start by taking it to a trek dealer and have them compare the bike to the schematic to see if a part is missing.

Did this happen to cause creaking sound in the rear, since I assume stays were rubbing together or more flexing occurs? I have an incurable creak but it comes and goes very sporadically.

I find my creak comes for the mino links coming slightly loose.

I've been fortunate to have my mino links remain tightened. Especially considering I run them slightly below Trek's recommended torque value, because I've heard of them cracking. I have a trip to ride some downhill coming up this weekend, so I'll first get the bike into the shop next week. I'm curious to see what this all looks like.

Posted: May 24, 2019 at 7:05 Quote
ZSchnei wrote:
I've been fortunate to have my mino links remain tightened. Especially considering I run them slightly below Trek's recommended torque value, because I've heard of them cracking. I have a trip to ride some downhill coming up this weekend, so I'll first get the bike into the shop next week. I'm curious to see what this all looks like.

Cracking Mino links? Never seen that. Seen plenty of them come loose and fall out. Lots of riders around here run a cable tie through the Mino pieces to prevent this. Keep it half loose so it doesn't mar the paint.

Posted: May 24, 2019 at 10:29 Quote
nouseforaname wrote:
ZSchnei wrote:
I've been fortunate to have my mino links remain tightened. Especially considering I run them slightly below Trek's recommended torque value, because I've heard of them cracking. I have a trip to ride some downhill coming up this weekend, so I'll first get the bike into the shop next week. I'm curious to see what this all looks like.

Cracking Mino links? Never seen that. Seen plenty of them come loose and fall out. Lots of riders around here run a cable tie through the Mino pieces to prevent this. Keep it half loose so it doesn't mar the paint.

I swear I’ve heard if the mino link “chip” cracking when torqued high. Maybe I’m crazy.

Posted: May 24, 2019 at 14:41 Quote
My slash is complete finally!
My slash

Posted: May 26, 2019 at 11:24 Quote
In ref to some posts and air shocks, don’t forget the tunes are for average joe so the HSC will never be correct and you’ll always add psi to overcompensate

Retune to your style/weight or different shock

Posted: May 26, 2019 at 11:38 Quote
ZSchnei wrote:
I swear I’ve heard if the mino link “chip” cracking when torqued high. Maybe I’m crazy.

I guess it's bound to happen if you over torque it. :shrugs: I meant just in general use. But I suppose event that's possible.

Just saw a guy who'd lost a main pivot nut, one of his Minos and (obviously) everything else was loose in the linkage.

Seems pretty common, and I'm not sure why.

Posted: May 28, 2019 at 7:30 Quote
enduroFactory wrote:
In ref to some posts and air shocks, don’t forget the tunes are for average joe so the HSC will never be correct and you’ll always add psi to overcompensate

Retune to your style/weight or different shock

I changed my shock so I could tune hsc for this reason. The monarch plus always lacked that.

Posted: May 28, 2019 at 9:16 Quote
Bit of an age old question here but I'm in a bit of a dilemma, and there may be some good experience here that can help me.

I currently have a 2014 Slash 7, in good condition with some decent upgrades (monarch rt3, SLX brakes, reverb stealth, XT mech, XTR shifter, hope Pro 2 Evo rear hub, bars, pedals and stem changes etc.).

I recently got a 2019 Nukeproof Scout 290 - significantly higher spec than the comp - Pike RCT3, reverb stealth, Guide RSC brakes, GX Eagle groupset, Nukeproof horizon bars and wheels etc, Michelin Wild Enduro tyres. It's still brand new, not ridden on any trails, just a couple times on local roads.

The Nukeproof is too big. Being a 29er (new for me) and medium, it's noticeably too big even though my Slash is a medium, and I wouldn't feel confident using the scout properly.

I'm considering a couple of options:
Option 1 - just sell the Scout and use the money to upgrade my Slash further. I'd look to save a little weight if possible on wheels and tyres, then maybe upgrade brakes, bars and possibly the crankset.

Option 2 - sell both bikes and buy a mid travel full sus (something like a YT Jeffsy or Trek Remedy, a good second hand one so carbon could be in the budget). The idea here is the mid travel bike could fulfill both roles of what the Slash and Scout could fill, with one bike.

Option 3 - Sell the Scout and buy a correctly sized hardtail. Probably an off the shelf Nukeproof Scout Comp, so a slight downgrade in spec to achieve the right size.

Sorry for the essay - anyone got any advice / experience on this?

Posted: May 28, 2019 at 9:24 Quote
pikls94 wrote:
Bit of an age old question here but I'm in a bit of a dilemma, and there may be some good experience here that can help me.

I currently have a 2014 Slash 7, in good condition with some decent upgrades (monarch rt3, SLX brakes, reverb stealth, XT mech, XTR shifter, hope Pro 2 Evo rear hub, bars, pedals and stem changes etc.).

I recently got a 2019 Nukeproof Scout 290 - significantly higher spec than the comp - Pike RCT3, reverb stealth, Guide RSC brakes, GX Eagle groupset, Nukeproof horizon bars and wheels etc, Michelin Wild Enduro tyres. It's still brand new, not ridden on any trails, just a couple times on local roads.

The Nukeproof is too big. Being a 29er (new for me) and medium, it's noticeably too big even though my Slash is a medium, and I wouldn't feel confident using the scout properly.

I'm considering a couple of options:
Option 1 - just sell the Scout and use the money to upgrade my Slash further. I'd look to save a little weight if possible on wheels and tyres, then maybe upgrade brakes, bars and possibly the crankset.

Option 2 - sell both bikes and buy a mid travel full sus (something like a YT Jeffsy or Trek Remedy, a good second hand one so carbon could be in the budget). The idea here is the mid travel bike could fulfill both roles of what the Slash and Scout could fill, with one bike.

Option 3 - Sell the Scout and buy a correctly sized hardtail. Probably an off the shelf Nukeproof Scout Comp, so a slight downgrade in spec to achieve the right size.

Sorry for the essay - anyone got any advice / experience on this?

If your interested in a mid travel trail bike and open to 29in wheel you should look into the fuel ex. If 27.5 is your thing trek makes a 27.5+ 140mm travel fuel. And if you want even more travel then go remedy. But honestly if you could I would try to sell both and put all the money towards a nice new bike. But keep in mind that’s my opinion.


 
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