2009 Manitou Dorado's

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2009 Manitou Dorado's
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Posted: Feb 11, 2009 at 12:27 Quote
on the video on PB, whom ever from manitou said the fork would be externially adjustable from 200 mm - 180 mm.
Wilson4 wrote:
Here's his post from Dropmachine.

"I have been looking over the posts and thought I would clear up some of the errors in the info about the upcoming new Dorado. I do know what the "real" info is as I work for the Hayes Bicycle Group doing development and testing, the Yeti pictured with the fork, is my personal bike and I have been riding the prototype for several months now. The fork will be a 2009 model rather than an '08. You will more than likely start to see the fork on the pros bikes early in next year’s race season, with a release to the public, hopefully early in the summer of 2008. So here is the scoop on the goods, the fork has 36mm stanchions (not 34mm), will have 200mm of travel (only travel that will be offered) and weighs a bit under 7lbs (6.4 to be exact) It uses a new style, low pressure air spring system which also has an air negative spring, both air chambers are adjusted through a common air valve. The damping system is also a new design. It has high and low speed compression adjustments, hydraulic dampened bottom out and top out and rebound adjustment. It does NOT have a lockout nor does it use any type of SPV system. Keep in mind that all of the forks are currently prototypes, we use parts (knobs, stickers, ect.) from other forks in our line up at times early in the ride test period, so that is why you see stickers that say SPV or knobs that mention features that don’t exist in the actual fork. It also allows us to test new designs for quite a while before the public figures things out."

Posted: Feb 11, 2009 at 12:53 Quote
Oh yeah that reminds me. Quite often on the '02-'03 Dorado, a good percentage of 'noodlie-ness' over time was due to pooched main crown bolts, they were pretty pinner for sure. If you have one of these older models, pull the bolts out and visually inspect the thread pitch. You'll no doubt probably notice they are stretched in the middle. Replace these with proper-length 'garden variety' bolts from your local hardware shop and re-install with a typical torque pattern and you'll get rid of a decent percentage of that unwanted lateral flex. Ding ding!

Posted: Feb 12, 2009 at 9:04 Quote
yeah I had an older dorado. I loved it. I personally did not feel the noodleness too much. I maintained mine well, I had it rebuilt twice a season and new pinch bolts every summer. It was a great fork and I am glad someone else is using it. i hope i get to compare it to a new one soon.

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 14:45 Quote
4169397

4169397


Nuff said.

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 14:51 Quote
too bad its going to be a flexy as hell fork. the hole point of the MY11 is to get stupid kids to buy it thinking its the exact same as the carbon version but 300 grams more.

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 17:27 Quote
odin333 wrote:
too bad its going to be a flexy as hell fork. the hole point of the MY11 is to get stupid kids to buy it thinking its the exact same as the carbon version but 300 grams more.

I fail to see your logic. Care to explain?

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 17:34 Quote
okay. carbon= super rigid. YET the carbon legged dorado still has some flex issues. so switching to a lightweight aluminum that only adds 300 grams is going to mean even more flex on top of that.

now look at the Shiver, it weighs 8.5 pounds, but you can still put your legs around the wheel and twist the bars and there is noticeable flex. so take over 2 pounds off to roughly show the MY11 and its understandable to see how the flex would be even worse.

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 17:38 Quote
odin333 wrote:
okay. carbon= super rigid. YET the carbon legged dorado still has some flex issues. so switching to a lightweight aluminum that only adds 300 grams is going to mean even more flex on top of that.

now look at the Shiver, it weighs 8.5 pounds, but you can still put your legs around the wheel and twist the bars and there is noticeable flex. so take over 2 pounds off to roughly show the MY11 and its understandable to see how the flex would be even worse.

Oh My God lets not EVEN START this again.... everyone needs to get off the parking lot flex tests, they mean sh*t all, ride it before you complain about flex

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 17:56 Quote
odin333 wrote:
okay. carbon= super rigid. YET the carbon legged dorado still has some flex issues. so switching to a lightweight aluminum that only adds 300 grams is going to mean even more flex on top of that.

now look at the Shiver, it weighs 8.5 pounds, but you can still put your legs around the wheel and twist the bars and there is noticeable flex. so take over 2 pounds off to roughly show the MY11 and its understandable to see how the flex would be even worse.

I am pretty sure the engineers at Manitou know what they are doing. You are a 15 year old kid from Canada, what makes you think you know better than they do?

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 18:00 Quote
odin333 wrote:
okay. carbon= super rigid. YET the carbon legged dorado still has some flex issues. so switching to a lightweight aluminum that only adds 300 grams is going to mean even more flex on top of that.

now look at the Shiver, it weighs 8.5 pounds, but you can still put your legs around the wheel and twist the bars and there is noticeable flex. so take over 2 pounds off to roughly show the MY11 and its understandable to see how the flex would be even worse.

You seem to have some interesting theories to say the least.

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 18:04 Quote
odin333 wrote:
okay. carbon= super rigid. YET the carbon legged dorado still has some flex issues. so switching to a lightweight aluminum that only adds 300 grams is going to mean even more flex on top of that.

now look at the Shiver, it weighs 8.5 pounds, but you can still put your legs around the wheel and twist the bars and there is noticeable flex. so take over 2 pounds off to roughly show the MY11 and its understandable to see how the flex would be even worse.

You are thinking about it in a very reverse minded way. Manitou did not just scale down a shiver, in fact, you cant quite compare the two at all. Think about it this way. The carbon walls are most likely quite thin, seeing as carbon has a high strength and stiffness, less of it is needed. Now take the aluminum. More of it is needed to reach an acceptable strength, but at the same time, the cross sectional area of the upper legs is increased. I wont go into the math of it, but the increased cross sectional area makes the legs quite stiff. I cant comment on magnitudes as I dont know the alloy or shape of the aluminum, nor the composition or material properties of the carbon fiber uppers, but I would be willing to bet that if you rode both back to back, you would be hard pressed to consider one stiffer than the other.

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 18:42 Quote
foxmtbing wrote:
odin333 wrote:
okay. carbon= super rigid. YET the carbon legged dorado still has some flex issues. so switching to a lightweight aluminum that only adds 300 grams is going to mean even more flex on top of that.

now look at the Shiver, it weighs 8.5 pounds, but you can still put your legs around the wheel and twist the bars and there is noticeable flex. so take over 2 pounds off to roughly show the MY11 and its understandable to see how the flex would be even worse.

I am pretty sure the engineers at Manitou know what they are doing. You are a 15 year old kid from Canada, what makes you think you know better than they do?

well the engineers at Manitou haven't been the most reliable people in past years. yes your right, i'm no suspension designer or anything, but i have spent a fair amount of time on various forks. all inverted forks suffer from flex. the only solution is to make them thicker and thicker, which adds weight. there is no way at all that its going to be as stiff as the Boxxer, 888, or 40. I mean a little flex is alright, but i don't want a wet noodle of a fork thats going to bounce off everything, and i just can't see an inverted fork within the same weight class as the boxxer, 40, 888 not being overly flexy.

anyways, I'm running on assumptions, and nobody here has really ridden one. so the only way to tell is to wait for the first reviews.

Posted: Oct 19, 2009 at 18:47 Quote
odin333 wrote:
foxmtbing wrote:
odin333 wrote:
okay. carbon= super rigid. YET the carbon legged dorado still has some flex issues. so switching to a lightweight aluminum that only adds 300 grams is going to mean even more flex on top of that.

now look at the Shiver, it weighs 8.5 pounds, but you can still put your legs around the wheel and twist the bars and there is noticeable flex. so take over 2 pounds off to roughly show the MY11 and its understandable to see how the flex would be even worse.

I am pretty sure the engineers at Manitou know what they are doing. You are a 15 year old kid from Canada, what makes you think you know better than they do?

well the engineers at Manitou haven't been the most reliable people in past years. yes your right, i'm no suspension designer or anything, but i have spent a fair amount of time on various forks. all inverted forks suffer from flex. the only solution is to make them thicker and thicker, which adds weight. there is no way at all that its going to be as stiff as the Boxxer, 888, or 40. I mean a little flex is alright, but i don't want a wet noodle of a fork thats going to bounce off everything, and i just can't see an inverted fork within the same weight class as the boxxer, 40, 888 not being overly flexy.

anyways, I'm running on assumptions, and nobody here has really ridden one. so the only way to tell is to wait for the first reviews.

From owning a Dorado and riding my buddys shiver I think the whole flex argument is just a crybaby excuse. The forks run fine, the problem with inverted forks are the cost.

A boxxer 2010 WC Has a lower price and a comparible weight to even the carbon 2010 dorado. Not saying the fork is a piece of shit but when i can buy a Boxxer WC for less then the aluminum dorado i think many people on this site know where im at. Its about proven durability and performance, a fair weight AND a good price.

Its like if some guy came to my door from mongolia and told me he was the original designer of ferrari and tried to sell me something hes "re-designed", would I buy it? no. Thats stupid. Maybe in a year or so, when the price is down and its proven to ride its worth.

Posted: Oct 30, 2009 at 12:07 Quote
Hey peeps, for the Record, the new Manitou is owned by HAYES and is not in any way connected to the old problematic brand you remember.

Posted: Oct 30, 2009 at 12:18 Quote
yeah i heard Hayes has an amazing unproblematic history.


 
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