Chromag Rootdown & Surface (and maybe Primer) Builds

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Chromag Rootdown & Surface (and maybe Primer) Builds
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Posted: Nov 28, 2018 at 4:15 Quote
I never managed to find that perfect setting on either a RS Pike or a Yari with Luftkappe and charger damper upgrade. No matter what I did, it was either too soft, too harsh, to much sag, not enough sag, etc.

So I swaped my RS fork for a Cane Creek Helm and I must say... that fork just feels right out of the box and even better when set up properly.


Posted: Nov 28, 2018 at 5:24 Quote
Yeah I've heard nothing but positives about those Helms. Any they're sexy as hell to boot.

Posted: Nov 28, 2018 at 9:15 Quote
I went from 51mm offset to 42mm on my Pipedream Moxie steel hardtail and it did not affect climbing. IME a steep STA keeps the front end down on steep climbs.

Posted: Nov 28, 2018 at 13:57 Quote
New colors are up on the Chromag site. I've got an order in for a black/shadow frame. Transfering parts from my Yelli Screamy, with a few new parts sprinkled in.

Posted: Nov 28, 2018 at 15:01 Quote
Atron80 wrote:
New colors are up on the Chromag site. I've got an order in for a black/shadow frame. Transfering parts from my Yelli Screamy, with a few new parts sprinkled in.

Looks like they've tweaked the geo a bit as well. Reduced head angle to 64 deg, increased SA to 76. Shorter seat tubes for a given size... and lower stack heights all around too?

Posted: Nov 28, 2018 at 16:06 Quote
Not sure I would want a steeper seat angle. On the flats 75 already puts me too far over the bars. Feels great on steep climbs though.

Posted: Dec 1, 2018 at 10:36 Quote
My partner and I are considering whether to splurge for custom frame bags for the 2017 Rootdown BA.

Can anyone recommend off the shelf frame bags that fit size M and/or M/L?

Cheers

Posted: Dec 2, 2018 at 6:31 Quote
How does the Rootdown handle tighter singletrack trails? I live in Eastern Canada where we don't have long ascents or descents. Lots of short steep climbs and then back down again.

The local trails have smaller roots and tight corners. At 59 I,m not the quickest but still like to cruise.

I,m looking to upgrade from an older steel RM Blizzard so the Rootdown would be a big step up!
Talking to the folks at Chromag you can order the Rootdown with either a 140, 150 or 160 travel fork.
Any recommendations?

Thanks

Posted: Dec 2, 2018 at 8:42 Quote
Go 160 for sure, I was talked into the 150-160 lyrik by the guys at Chromag and they were bang on. I’ve tried it at 150 but it’s much better in 160. I ride the exact kind of trails you’re talking about and it handles it well. The bike is more fun plus than 29, I’ve tried both and settled in with 2.8 minions.

Posted: Dec 2, 2018 at 13:31 Quote
canuckAME wrote:
How does the Rootdown handle tighter singletrack trails? I live in Eastern Canada where we don't have long ascents or descents. Lots of short steep climbs and then back down again.

The local trails have smaller roots and tight corners. At 59 I,m not the quickest but still like to cruise.

I,m looking to upgrade from an older steel RM Blizzard so the Rootdown would be a big step up!
Talking to the folks at Chromag you can order the Rootdown with either a 140, 150 or 160 travel fork.
Any recommendations?

Thanks

The Rootdown would work but wouldn’t be my first choice. I’d go for something lighter with a steeper head angle, designed around a shorter fork. You could run the Rootdown with a 140 fork which would help, but it’s designed around 160 and the seat tube angle will get very steep, which isn’t ideal.

Coming from a Kona Taro (alloy Honzo) the Rootdown is noticeably more sluggish in the tight stuff, which seems to be mostly due to weight and geometry. The Taro definitely felt more efficient and wanting to leap forward, while still being happy on descents (though not quite as happy as the Rootdown).

Posted: Dec 2, 2018 at 14:22 Quote
For me the bb height is too low with 150mm fork and 27.5x2.8, biggest issue was techy climbs. A 140mm fork even with 29" wheels could be quite similar.

With the 76* HA of the 2019s, and keep in mind that will get steeper once the fork is at sag, you have to consider whether that steep SA will work for you. The bike hasn't grown in ETT/FC length so another thing to keep in consideration.

Posted: Dec 3, 2018 at 19:48 Quote
Ru-tang wrote:
How many people are running reduced offsets on their forks?

I'm having trouble finding a happy medium of weight on the front wheel during steep climbing vs having too much weight on my hands on the flatter stuff. I'm wondering if reducing the fork offset would help with this by putting more weight on the front wheel. I'm not really sure about what the different offsets do . . .

I have a 46 offset on my 27.5+ rootdown and 51 on my full suspension 29er. I don’t really notice a difference when I’m riding either bike for a while. It’s just a slightly different feel when I switch between them. Relatively, the 51 feels a little lighter and I tend to oversteer at first, and the opposite with the 46.

Head & seat angles, saddle to bars are pretty similar. 3.0” vs 2.5” rubber adds to the difference in “feel” as well (pneumatic trail).

If you consider that the 5mm difference in offset is perpendicular to the steering axis, you’d only shorten the front-center by maybe 3mm. My feeling is that it’s probably not worth the money and you’d be better off playing with stem length and bar height as another person recommmended.

Posted: Dec 6, 2018 at 11:22 Quote
canuckAME wrote:
How does the Rootdown handle tighter singletrack trails? I live in Eastern Canada where we don't have long ascents or descents. Lots of short steep climbs and then back down again.

The local trails have smaller roots and tight corners. At 59 I,m not the quickest but still like to cruise.

I,m looking to upgrade from an older steel RM Blizzard so the Rootdown would be a big step up!
Talking to the folks at Chromag you can order the Rootdown with either a 140, 150 or 160 travel fork.
Any recommendations?

Thanks

I'm in Ottawa and loving my 2017 Rootdown BA with a 160 Lyrik. Trails around here don't have a lot of sustained climbing like out west, but we do have lots of pitchy bits where the 160 comes in handy. And at 55 I have to admit sometimes the climbs do seem a little long! I thought the long fork might be a problem climbing but it hasn't at all - in fact I can't remember the last time I used the 130mm setting on the 2P Lyrik. Chromag must agree that it's not needed because they spec a Single Air fork now.

A buddy has a niner SIR 9 that's lighter and has a little more zip in the twisties, but I wouldn't trade. The BA is a blast in the woods - it just takes a bit more body english to push around - but it rides lighter than it is and it has so. much. confidence. on the downs. And it has room for big tires that take care of the roots!

Both flavours are fun - the Blizzard was a great bike but whatever you get you're going to get your mind blown!

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