Magura MT Bleeding

PB Forum :: Mechanics' Lounge
Magura MT Bleeding
| Next Page
Author Message
Posted: Jun 1, 2020 at 13:14 Quote
If that's true, it means quality is not consistent on all the magura brakes. If you use the standard blocks or don't put a little extra fluid in, I can't imagine how you can get a bite point before the lever touches the bar...

Posted: Jun 1, 2020 at 13:17 Quote
cucupebicicleta wrote:
If that's true, it means quality is not consistent on all the magura brakes. If you use the standard blocks or don't put a little extra fluid in, I can't imagine how you can get a bite point before the lever touches the bar...

That just means you have air in the system still.
I bleed my own brakes and have also had it done by various shops with the same results, shops are all using standard Magura bleed kits not some jimmy rigged setup with custom bleed blocks.

I understand some like to overfill to get a more solid lever, or whatever the reason but it’s 100% not required to get a solid lever.

Posted: Jun 1, 2020 at 13:35 Quote
Branmuffin wrote:
cucupebicicleta wrote:
If that's true, it means quality is not consistent on all the magura brakes. If you use the standard blocks or don't put a little extra fluid in, I can't imagine how you can get a bite point before the lever touches the bar...

That just means you have air in the system still.
I bleed my own brakes and have also had it done by various shops with the same results, shops are all using standard Magura bleed kits not some jimmy rigged setup with custom bleed blocks.

I understand some like to overfill to get a more solid lever, or whatever the reason but it’s 100% not required to get a solid lever.

Correct it doesn't change how solid the lever is when it hits the pad, it simply reduces the amount of travel in the lever before it contacts. Many of us prefer this Big Grin

Posted: Jun 1, 2020 at 16:45 Quote
friendlyfoe wrote:
Branmuffin wrote:
cucupebicicleta wrote:
If that's true, it means quality is not consistent on all the magura brakes. If you use the standard blocks or don't put a little extra fluid in, I can't imagine how you can get a bite point before the lever touches the bar...

That just means you have air in the system still.
I bleed my own brakes and have also had it done by various shops with the same results, shops are all using standard Magura bleed kits not some jimmy rigged setup with custom bleed blocks.

I understand some like to overfill to get a more solid lever, or whatever the reason but it’s 100% not required to get a solid lever.

Correct it doesn't change how solid the lever is when it hits the pad, it simply reduces the amount of travel in the lever before it contacts. Many of us prefer this Big Grin

Which is fine, everyone has a preference and part of the reason a bunch of people run the HC3 levers. But this shouldn’t be construed as the standard bleed process does not work. If your levers are pulling to the bar, you did not bleed the system correctly or have a leak.

Posted: Jun 1, 2020 at 22:17 Quote
Branmuffin wrote:
If your levers are pulling to the bar, you did not bleed the system correctly or have a leak.

As much as I hate the saying, on this one we'll agree to disagree. There are so many reports of these brakes having too much lever travel without some creative bleeding like this. You simply cannot generalize that ALL of these Maguras will work properly with the "default" bleeding procedure.

Posted: Jun 1, 2020 at 22:24 Quote
To be fair I tried my overfilling method today once I had completed the bleed and it didn't take up any extra slack in the system. The brakes do have a fair bit of lever travel but I think part of the problem is the lever shape. It has so much bend to it that it ends up too close to the levers. I think a straighter lever would solve the problem, so I'll just order the bruni 1 finger and wait sorry nevermind, that lever costs almost as much as my mt5's in the first place. I think it'll be fine. I had to set the lever a tiny bit farther out from the bars than is ideal but not so much that it'll be a problem.

During the bleed process squeezing the lever a bunch with everything open definitely sent piles of micro bubbles out of the system. Plus the open port in the bottom is a bit of a faff solution so I could definitely see people struggling to bleed them.

Posted: Jun 2, 2020 at 9:56 Quote
I've seen people have good results using Shimano levers with these Magura clipers. Probably if I had realized this before buying HC3s, I would've tried that.

I've been out again and it still feels rock solid. It's like a completely different/new brake now.

Posted: Jun 2, 2020 at 10:03 Quote
cucupebicicleta wrote:
I've seen people have good results using Shimano levers with these Magura clipers. Probably if I had realized this before buying HC3s, I would've tried that.

I've been out again and it still feels rock solid. It's like a completely different/new brake now.

The brakes are fantastic, but I was not a fan of the stock levers or the 1 finger levers and eventually also ended up with HC3 levers which are great but not cheap.

Posted: Jun 9, 2020 at 6:28 Quote
Bringing this old thread back up since it comes up when searching for tips to bleed these brakes. I hope my contribution is helpful.

I've got a new pair of MT Trail SLs and had a hard time getting them to feel right using the factory method. I watched a bunch of videos and read what people had to say on the internet. Ultimately, I came up with my own method (I think).

Here's what I found:

How you start the process is not super important. Attach the syringes to the lever and caliper as described in the manual. Push the fluid back and forth between the syringes (I don't like pulling it) and cycle the lever a bunch. Maybe tap the caliper a few times with a mallet (air can get caught in there).

Once the process by which you eliminate air from the line is done (and this is critical but also pretty straight forward), you must be super careful about how you disconnect the syringes - there doesn't seem to be a whole lot of margin for error here (unlike some other systems)

What worked for me was doing it in the opposite order from what Magura recommends:

With the syringe at the lever full of maybe 5ml of fluid (enough that you have a margin for error), raise the caliper so that the bleed port on the caliper is the highest point in the whole system (if you have internally routed rear caliper, you'll need a stand so you can rotate the bike to achieve this).

Carefully remove the syringe from the caliper making sure that fluid is right at the very top of the bleed port when the syringe disconnects. Add a few drops slowly if it's not while making sure to always hold the port in such a way as to be the highest point in the system. The surface tension of the fluid will allow you to get it all the way full. Install the bleed port screw - it should displace fluid if you've done this correctly (do I need to remind you to have taken the pads out before you started?).

Lower the caliper so that the syringe coming out of the lever is now the highest point in the system. Carefully remove that syringe again making sure fluid is completely full at the lever. Replace the lever screw.

When replacing both screws, they should displace some fluid.

Wipe everything down and reassemble the bakes.

YMMV.

Posted: Oct 25, 2021 at 15:30 Quote
I just bled my brakes again. I fiddled around with it and couldn't get it right.

Then I remembered that I posted what I said above. I came back, looked it up, tried it and it worked.

So.... This is the way.

Posted: Oct 25, 2021 at 22:09 Quote
LA-Law wrote:
I just bled my brakes again. I fiddled around with it and couldn't get it right.

Then I remembered that I posted what I said above. I came back, looked it up, tried it and it worked.

So.... This is the way.

I always disconnect at the master first and rarely have a problem. The real problem is that air gets trapped in the master and is tough to get out. You just need to pull the lever a bunch, wiggle everything a bunch, and get the 1 million micro bubbles that come out when you do out of the system. Just takes some time and patience.

| Next Page

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.006393
Mobile Version of Website