CTV NEWS: Bikerescue.com is a scam.

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CTV NEWS: Bikerescue.com is a scam.
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Posted: Jan 28, 2008 at 12:08 Quote
smells very fishy. like douche water in fact.

Posted: Jan 28, 2008 at 13:01 Quote
yes a douche in water Ninja

Posted: Aug 24, 2008 at 16:52 Quote
I purchased a Devinci Wilson from Bike Rescue after much careful consideration online from my house in Whistler. I drove down one Sunday to buy the bike from him down in Coquitlam. I checked out the bike and it had the normal creaks and groans that a downhill would have. Gord (founder of bikerescue) pointed out to me the rimset which was the stock AlexRims was bent in the back end, which it was badly rolled and bent. Curiously he pointed out on a forum on pinkbike in early June that he had a Wilson that he had wrecked the rimset on HIMSELF. Weird that the stock rims were still on there and still bent. Also Unbeknownst to me the headset was completely blown and trashed on the bottom race. ALSO without my knowledge the seals on the shocks were completely trashed and blown. Without the chance to check the bike out with wrenches and take it aparart or ride it any distance more than a couple hundred feet I took out an 800$ deposit from the the atm (daily limit). I delivered it in person and then I was left with a 1300$ bill for the remainder of the bike, which he would deliver the next day. Needless to say it weighed very heavily on my mind driving back to Whistler.

To Date:
150$ qouted from Whistler Bike Co. for a new rim and spokes (plus labour to lace it)
120$ for a sub par headset from the Norco Catologue (plus labour)
35$ for new shock seals (plus labour)

Someone was a rookie and didn't know how to shred the bike. I'm no idiot and certainly won't pay 120$ for a headset that is inferior to any Cane Creek (cheaper than 120$) or Chris King (more expensive than 120$).

Fast forward to today, over one month from purchase of my claimed "2008 Wilson that was in 2008 shape." The fruits of my 2100$ well spent dollars is a bike I have YET to ride in ANY downhill capacity ie. berms,jumps,rocks,drops GNAR GNAR!!. My DOWHILL BIKE, has yet to be DOWN A HILL that doesn't consist of more then a 1% grade and paved due to the fact its in complete garbage shape! I'm sure mister Bike Rescue knew about the damage to the bike as he might have well indeed inflicted it? What I'm getting at is to be weary of good he sells not only because of the nature of the goods, but the MERE CONDITION they are in. My bike is in complete trash shape an is unridable after he assured me it was perfectly fine to ride. His eyes LIT up when I gave him that 1300$ in cash... please be careful. If ANYONE has any questions don't hesitate to IM me

Posted: Jun 11, 2009 at 18:30 Quote
FYI:
http://www.metronews.ca/vancouver/Local/article/243667--bike-rescue-shut-down-by-new-west-owner-being-investigated

Mod Plus
Posted: Jun 11, 2009 at 18:35 Quote
There was a huge article in Mountainbike Action about Bike Rescue in it and they were less than thrilled.

Posted: Jun 11, 2009 at 18:40 Quote
wow, when I got my wheel set from gord about two months ago he had an entire place filled with bikes, most of them super crap condition, pitty the fool who bought a bike off of him. Its good to see that he cant do bussiness anymore

Posted: Jun 21, 2009 at 9:28 Quote
laurie1 wrote:
There was a huge article in Mountain Bike Action about Bike Rescue in it and they were less than thrilled.
Obviously you never even read the article in Mountain Bike Action, because you say they were less than thrilled. Uh, then why was I the 'Riders Who Inspire' article feature of the month? You are being led by media sensationalism, I would hope you can take some time to actually read about people who have dealt with us rather than just those who have no real idea of the facts.
As for the CTV News piece it is not quite right. I was not operating with a business license so the city asked me to stop until I get one (the application is being processed as I write this) and as for the investigation part, the police have been keeping a close eye on Bike Rescue for a few years now to make sure I am doing what I say I am doing. You will notice (painfully obvious actually) that I have never been charged with anything, because while how I operate Bike Rescue is controversial to be sure, there are no laws being broken. They are just making sure it stays that way and I welcome the scrutiny.
The guy who says I was trying to sell him his stole bike? No where does it say that bike shop had given him the wrong serial number, making it impossible for the bike I had to come up on any of the police & CPIC shocks that we do on bikes. Even the police officer who came down to investigate stated the guy had no legal claim to the bike and that I did no have to turn the bike over to them. But after discussing the bike with him at length I could tell by a couple of custom changes that had been done that it was in fact his bike so I returned it. Because that is what Bike Rescue does, we reunite stolen bikes with their owners.
But keep the discussion alive, it makes us all that much more aware of the epidemic problem of bike theft and hopefully inspires others to do something about it as well.

Cheers!
Gord

Mod Plus
Posted: Jun 21, 2009 at 10:08 Quote
I don't support anything that pays for the theft of bikes. My $8500 DH bike was stolen by a drug ring linked to meth. The addicts stole bikes, stripped them down and then sold them for a hit of meth or a devalued amount of money so this topic hits hard and hurts. In my case, security cameras caught him and police have dealt with him before. He also confessed to stealing my bike. For a bike worth $8500, he got $300 in drug money. The police caught him as well as arrested several others for obstructing justice and being in the possession of stolen goods. Funny thing is that I was offering a $1000 no questions asked reward for the safe return of my bike. I never saw that bike again and my guess is as good as yours as to where it went. Anything that increases or perpetuates the theft of bicycles by rewarding people for the theft of bikes is ludicrous especially, when it is an organization. It is an injustice to society and cyclists everywhere! Your business practices are not ethical or moral and therefore, I do not support Bike Rescue.

Posted: Jun 22, 2009 at 17:44 Quote
laurie1 wrote:
I don't support anything that pays for the theft of bikes. My $8500 DH bike was stolen by a drug ring linked to meth. The addicts stole bikes, stripped them down and then sold them for a hit of meth or a devalued amount of money so this topic hits hard and hurts. In my case, security cameras caught him and police have dealt with him before. He also confessed to stealing my bike. For a bike worth $8500, he got $300 in drug money. The police caught him as well as arrested several others for obstructing justice and being in the possession of stolen goods. Funny thing is that I was offering a $1000 no questions asked reward for the safe return of my bike. I never saw that bike again and my guess is as good as yours as to where it went. Anything that increases or perpetuates the theft of bicycles by rewarding people for the theft of bikes is ludicrous especially, when it is an organization. It is an injustice to society and cyclists everywhere! Your business practices are not ethical or moral and therefore, I do not support Bike Rescue.

Your concerns are the exact things I have been struggling with every day that I run Bike Rescue. How can I do what I do without adding to the problem? This is not an easy question, and you are right to not support anything that perpetuates the problem. While I truly believe I have done way more good out there, yeah, I have to humble myself to the fact that I have made errors and bent some rules that I had no right to. In the end, what differentiates what I am trying to achieve and a bike fence is intent. My intent is to get stolen bikes back their owners, a fence's intent is to make money through a criminal endeavor. For those of you who think I have been profiting of Bike Rescue, here is a little fact for you. I made just over $65K the year before I started Bike Rescue and every year since I have been filing tax returns for less and my personal costs have increased. I had $5,000 in the bank and a working debt load of about $3,000. I now owe over $19,000 directly attributable to operating Bike Rescue. Sure, if I could snap my fingers and sell all the bikes I have I would be ahead by about $10,000, but the effort & overhead just to sell them all is going to make is whole thing a break even at best.
These amongst many other factors (especially the immense toll on my personal life this project has taken) are the reasons I am shutting down Bike Rescue at the end of this bike season. I am very passionate about what I am doing and the decision was not easy or done lightly. I made the decision in March after a long hard look with the question in mind 'can I do something more effective than this?'. I think I can and that I where I am beginning to turn my attention. Don't think that this is the last you have heard of me in the bike community. All of this current flurry of media coverage stems from my foolishly trusting a journalist with the Tyee who let the cat out of the bag on my choice to end bike Rescue before I was ready to let it be known. (And I actually like the article.) Lisa Rossington of CTV News who I already had an antagonistic relationship with from last year (She hurled a pile of insults and outlandish accusations at me and I called her a fat poodle. You just can't come back from a moment like that...) got a hold of the Tyee article and decided to get one last good round of digs in at me. So think of me what you will, I am retiring this project seeing it as something worth the effort but not the cost. And those who think I am just some dirt bag, you really need to ask some bigger questions about things like: Why would a criminal endeavor advertise it's existence? Why would I constantly bug the cops into action to get them to check my bikes? (You would be shocked at how much wasted effort has gone into just getting them to do their job.) Why would I return any bikes and not just quietly strip them all down and sell them off for parts like the or 5 active bike feces in the Greater Vancouver area? Why would I not ship my bikes out of the region and just sell them some where else with no concern for repercussions? Interesting questions really.
But as I have always maintained, love or hate Bike Rescue as you will, just keep the discussion alive on how we as a community we can do some thing about all these sh*t sacks out there who prey off our love of the trails and the genuine trusting nature I see every where amongst riders.

Gord Blackwell

Mod Plus
Posted: Jun 22, 2009 at 18:03 Quote
The fact of the matter is that you still try and sell the more expensive bikes in your fleet at a substantial profit. If you truly wanted to make a difference, you'd donate those bikes to underprivileged riders or "at risk teens" or other charitable organizations rather than trying to sell them on various websites. No one under any circumstances should profit from the theft of anything. I understand that the debate would be "how does an institution such as Bike Rescue operate with no capital" and the answer is easy. You know what's going on with the underground bicycle theft rings that are in operation stealing peoples' pride and joy so why can't you work closely with the police (both Vancouver Police and RCMP) and tell them where these bike rings steal the bikes, where they take them to, where they disassemble them, and where they sell them to. Surely, this is possible. Be the detective that solves the case rather than the one that perpetuates the theft of bicycles, contributes to the problem, and ultimately, rewards the scum of the earth! Sure, the concept of Bike Rescue is great but it should be a nonprofit organization and any bikes that aren’t returned to their owners should go somewhere deserving rather than ending up on a buy/sell. This is not passion. This is profiting off of another’s misfortune which I don’t agree with.

Posted: Jun 22, 2009 at 18:13 Quote
.....And the media is almost as reliable as pinkbike forums for speaking the truth. SO now all the stolen bikes in Van can end up somewhere else. Crack heads are not stealing bikes BECAUSE of bike rescue nor do I think it is fueling the fire. Crack heads steal bikes for crack money. They will continue to steal them no matter what. To think shutting down bike rescue will curb bike theft is idiodic.
Laurie1 to think that a Theif is going to call you and say hey I found this 8500 dollar bike I want your 1000 bucks is funny. Dumb theives might take the bait. Thats why they are not stealing bikes anymore. Anyone with an ounce of intelect would not even risk bringing back a stolen bike to the owner.

I am not defending Gord as I am a neutral but I am pointing out the obvious. 1) Media twist any story to get viewers attention, 2) Bikes will be stolen as long as people have them. 3) At least SOME people got their bikes back. 4) Some do not even attempt to look for their stolen bike because thier insurance covered them to get a BETTER bike.

The bigger fish to fry are the bike shops or bike tech's that give addresses to bike theives so they can get a cut. This has happened more than once in Toronto and I could bet it has happened or is happening in the westAs well as the fences that are stripping and shipping the bikes out of the country or to other provinces. This has happened more than once in Toronto and I could bet it has happened or is happening in the west.

Posted: Jun 22, 2009 at 18:16 Quote
laurie1 wrote:
If you truly wanted to make a difference, you'd donate those bikes to underprivileged riders or "at risk teens" or other charitable organizations rather than trying to sell them on various websites.

So they can sell them?

Posted: Jun 22, 2009 at 18:21 Quote
May I just put out there, what went on with the massive amount of bikes stolen in Toronto not all that long ago? This is starting to sound similar.

Posted: Jun 22, 2009 at 19:23 Quote
photoguy9 wrote:
May I just put out there, what went on with the massive amount of bikes stolen in Toronto not all that long ago? This is starting to sound similar.

A guy who owned a high end bike shop was selling the addresses of exotic bike owners so they could be stolen. There was another guy who was doing the same thing in T.O but it was with mid/lower end bikes.

Mod Plus
Posted: Jun 22, 2009 at 19:38 Quote
If thieves didn’t have anywhere to “dispose” of these stolen bikes and they sure as hell aren’t getting money for them or a hit of their drug of choice, i can guarantee that the amount of theft, violence, and other illegal activity would substantially decrease. There are many “problem areas” in my city and in an extreme measure, the city bought the property that was in question and condemned it and it is now going to be demolished. This pushed the crime rate in this quadrant of downtown Calgary to the lowest it has been in decades. Although there has been a miniscule increase in crime in the surrounding areas, the city increased the police presence in the areas and have now lowered the crime rate to below where it was prior to the condemning of the building.

It is clear that if there was no where to sell these stolen bikes, less bikes would be stolen as it would be extremely difficult to get money or drugs for them. By providing thieves with money or a drug, they are effectively saying that stealing a bike is “ok” and you’ll be rewarded for it. Therefore, it just perpetuates the cycle more and more. This is what I have an issue with.

As for my $1000 reward, there were a lot of good tips from this organized crime theft ring that operated in Calgary and the surrounding area but I never got the bike back. Thieves turn on each other all the time. This is how I managed to send several individuals to prison for obstructing justice and selling stolen property. The tipster led me (the police) to a house where criminal activity was occurring. The saying “there is no honor amongst thieves” is true. Also, my reward was a no questions asked reward for the safe return of my bike. All I wanted was the bike. I didn’t care who stole it (I saw the person steal it via security cameras) and the police recognized him too. I had no issues picking him out from a lineup either. This wasn’t going to be a sting of some sort. The police caught up with the thief a few days after my bike was stolen.

Media does put their own spin on things. However, I am saying what I have to because I have been through the loss of a bike. I know and understand the principles upon which Bike Rescue operates and I personally think it is unethical and immoral. This is my own belief and not one based upon the media. You are right that bikes will always get stolen. However, if the items that thieves steal are harder to dispose of/get rid of, people won’t steal as they won’t have the ability to get anything for the items they steal. Even though some people get their bike back which I commend Bike Rescue and Gord for, this does not negate the things that I have stated above. Insurance did cover my bike but like all insurance companies, they’d rather not payout any claims and if they have to, you pay a deductible or your premiums go up. I’d much rather have my beloved bike back than the check that insurance cut me. I worked extremely hard to buy that bike and I cherished it! Nothing will ever bring it back.

Finally, just because you are an “at risk youth” or an economically disadvantaged youth doesn’t mean that you aren’t a contributing member to society. Look at all the community centers designed for at risk youth. These teens don’t steal stuff from their youth center and go and pawn it. It is simply a place for youth to go in order to escape drugs, gangs, and violence. The same goes for disadvantaged youth. Just go and ask someone who is a social worker their perspective on at risk youth or economically disadvantaged children. What you are describing are just stereotypes.


 
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